Can i read at mass when i haven't gone to confession?


#1

I have been chosen to give the 2nd reading at mass tonight, but im not sure if i should.

I’ve always known that you cannot receive communion without going to confession first and i was wondering if this also applies to reading the first or second reading? Because they are both as important as the other, one is the Word of God and the other is the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.

So to put it short, can I say the second reading when i haven’t gone to confession yet?

Also i have a real problem with going to confession, im not afraid of going to confession to confess my sins, its just that i know that in order for a confession to be valid then i must be truly sorry and resolve never to do those things again.

In recent years i have started a habit of stealing things from my family. I am sorry for stealing, i did not like it and i still hate it, its just that i don’t want to give back what i have stolen because if i had not stolen the things i would never be able to get it (because my family is poor). I have even stolen money just so i could buy clothes so i could apply for a job.

I really want to talk to a priest, but im afraid to do it outside of confession, because im kind of a prominent face in my diocese but then i cant do it in confession, because even though i am sorry for stealing i have no intention to return the things i have stolen, though i do try and make up for it in my actions at home. Every time a start thinking about it my brain starts to get a bit muddled, can some one help me think things through?


#2

It is good that you are respecting the Word of God which you proclaim as reader and seek to have confession first.

You don’t specify whether you are concerned about mortal or venial sin. Obviously venial sin is less of a problem before reading than mortal sin is, but nevertheless, the answer is that confession is not **required **in either case.

Please see this answer by Fr Serpa.

When you see the priest before Mass, ask him to hear you Confession. You need to receive absolution as soon as possible. Whether you serve or not is not important compared to your need to receive absolution. It’s ok to read or serve, but do not receive Holy Communion in the state of mortal sin. If the priest can’t help you until after Mass, then confess after Mass. But don’t let a week go by. You are in my prayers.


#3

You can receive communion if you haven’t gone to confession, unless you are in a state of mortal sin. In that case, you will have to go to confession first and confess that sin before you can receive communion.


#4

Do you mean can you read while in a state of mortal sin? Yes, you may.

And as others already stated, you only shouldn’t receive communion if you are in a state of mortal sin. THEN you must go to confession before receiving. But that same rule does not apply to reading at Mass.


#5

[quote="sweetsour, post:1, topic:305429"]
I have been chosen to give the 2nd reading at mass tonight, but im not sure if i should.

I've always known that you cannot receive communion without going to confession first and i was wondering if this also applies to reading the first or second reading? Because they are both as important as the other, one is the Word of God and the other is the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.

So to put it short, can I say the second reading when i haven't gone to confession yet?

Also i have a real problem with going to confession, im not afraid of going to confession to confess my sins, its just that i know that in order for a confession to be valid then i must be truly sorry and resolve never to do those things again.

In recent years i have started a habit of stealing things from my family. I am sorry for stealing, i did not like it and i still hate it, its just that i don't want to give back what i have stolen because if i had not stolen the things i would never be able to get it (because my family is poor). I have even stolen money just so i could buy clothes so i could apply for a job.

I really want to talk to a priest, but im afraid to do it outside of confession, because im kind of a prominent face in my diocese but then i cant do it in confession, because even though i am sorry for stealing i have no intention to return the things i have stolen, though i do try and make up for it in my actions at home. Every time a start thinking about it my brain starts to get a bit muddled, can some one help me think things through?

[/quote]

Theft is quite complicated. It originates with desire which may be for something good, but then, when it is seen that another has what is desired, jealousy or envy may occur. After that anger may occur (which is vengence for the one that has the desired person or thing). Finally theft (or adultery) may occur to get that thing or experience, and may also involve lying. So there can be a chain of sins, and the sins can even be in thought only, when we are planning something like theft.

Also the seriousness of theft depends upon the value to the person taken from. Also if one steals to survive, having no other way at the time, may make it justifiable (such as for food). The Catholic Catechism has much on this. Since it is complicated it is very good idea to talk to a priest about it for clarification.

Catechism:

2401 The seventh commandment forbids unjustly taking or keeping the goods of one's neighbor and wronging him in any way with respect to his goods. It commands justice and charity in the care of earthly goods and the fruits of men's labor. For the sake of the common good, it requires respect for the universal destination of goods and respect for the right to private property. Christian life strives to order this world's goods to God and to fraternal charity.

2408 The seventh commandment forbids theft, that is, usurping another's property against the reasonable will of the owner. There is no theft if consent can be presumed or if refusal is contrary to reason and the universal destination of goods. This is the case in obvious and urgent necessity when the only way to provide for immediate, essential needs (food, shelter, clothing . . .) is to put at one's disposal and use the property of others.[190]

2412 In virtue of commutative justice, reparation for injustice committed requires the restitution of stolen goods to their owner:
Jesus blesses Zacchaeus for his pledge: "If I have defrauded anyone of anything, I restore it fourfold."[192] Those who, directly or indirectly, have taken possession of the goods of another, are obliged to make restitution of them, or to return the equivalent in kind or in money, if the goods have disappeared, as well as the profit or advantages their owner would have legitimately obtained from them. Likewise, all who in some manner have taken part in a theft or who have knowingly benefited from it - for example, those who ordered it, assisted in it, or received the stolen goods - are obliged to make restitution in proportion to their responsibility and to their share of what was stolen.

vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p3s2c2a7.htm


#6

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