Can laity purchase a censer and a boat for home devotions?


#1

There is this nice Byzantine censer for only 60 dollars with a boat and I was thinking about using at my house for home devotions for the incense to rise as my prayers.

And what are the rules about laity incensing a little home devotional altar with the 2 swings, 2 swings, 2 swings set?


#2

I did this way back when, and they let me buy the charcoal and incense, I don't think it's canonically forbidden, if that's what you're asking.

Eventually I donated the incense to a church as it wreaked havoc with my asthma. :D


#3

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:334529"]
There is this nice Byzantine censer for only 60 dollars with a boat and I was thinking about using at my house for home devotions for the incense to rise as my prayers.

And what are the rules about laity incensing a little home devotional altar with the 2 swings, 2 swings, 2 swings set?

[/quote]

Who sells a thurible and boat for only $60? I would like their address :) .

I only have two ceramic hand censers and no boat at all.


#4

I have a hand censer at home; as far as I know there is no canonical prohibition to the use of incense at home, it is a devotion just like lighting candles and tying ribbons.

(and andrewstx, might I direct you to bostonmonks.com/index.php/cPath/38 in the event that you haven't heard of them? They have a hand censer for only $12 and their incense is fairly high quality).


#5

My friend who is a Monk, is the one who taught me how to use incense. There is nothing wrong or forbidden about using a censor with a boat and some incense. Laity can can do this with no problem. Doing it at home would be a private devotion, so it won't really matter how many times you swing it.


#6

I dont think there is any problem, i have a small brass stand alone censer that is for incense cones, not traditional i know, but i think it helps set the mood for prayer. I am working on possibly making one for real incense. I would jump on that censer and boat for $60... Where is it?


#7

[quote="Gidge, post:2, topic:334529"]
I did this way back when, and they let me buy the charcoal and incense, I don't think it's canonically forbidden, if that's what you're asking.

Eventually I donated the incense to a church as it wreaked havoc with my asthma. :D

[/quote]

Same here, except that i donated the entire swinging censer.

It was wonderful to have at home, though. :)


#8

In case anyone is interested, the "censor" name is a thurible.

When you go to buy incense, ask the shop keeper about the different kinds. There are some which produce more smoke, some less, and various scents.

If there is a particular smell you like at your church you can ask the Priest or Sacristan what brand. You may find some sample size packs which are helpful determining what you like.


#9

I saw a censer and boat on ebay for $25. It wasnt really ornate though. More functional that decorative


#10

Leaflet Missal sells an entire home incense kit for $49.95:

leafletonline.com/Home-Incense-Kit/productinfo/14525/


#11

This is the place I bought mine.

churchsupplywarehouse.com/catalog_search.asp?action=searchRedirect&searchRedirectValue=censer&searchRedirectType=Phrase+Search


#12

A censer can be used at home. Be careful not to use too much incense or you may set off the smoke alarm. ;)


#13

[quote="MorEphrem, post:4, topic:334529"]
I have a hand censer at home; as far as I know there is no canonical prohibition to the use of incense at home, it is a devotion just like lighting candles and tying ribbons.

(and andrewstx, might I direct you to bostonmonks.com/index.php/cPath/38 in the event that you haven't heard of them? They have a hand censer for only $12 and their incense is fairly high quality).

[/quote]

Thank you so much, the source I had been using for incense and charcoals had a fire and I had been looking for another.


#14

I really don't know about home incense for Latin Catholics, but in Eastern churches Catholic and Orthodox, thuribles you swing are limited to church use for Priests and Deacons.

In the Eastern churches at home you are only allowed hand censers. I prefer
Eastern incense it is less cough provoking and comes in small pebbles or lumps instead or the fine grains and pieces of leaves like Western Incense.


#15

[quote="ChurchSoldier, post:8, topic:334529"]
In case anyone is interested, the "censor" name is a thurible.

When you go to buy incense, ask the shop keeper about the different kinds. There are some which produce more smoke, some less, and various scents.

If there is a particular smell you like at your church you can ask the Priest or Sacristan what brand. You may find some sample size packs which are helpful determining what you like.

[/quote]

Both are correct. I have never heard a censor called a thurible in the East.


#16

[quote="andrewstx, post:14, topic:334529"]
I really don't know about home incense for Latin Catholics, but in Eastern churches Catholic and Orthodox, thuribles you swing are limited to church use for Priests and Deacons.

In the Eastern churches at home you are only allowed hand censers. I prefer
Eastern incense it is less cough provoking and comes in small pebbles or lumps instead or the fine grains and pieces of leaves like Western Incense.

[/quote]

That's simply not true, at least not for all the Eastern churches. Do you happen to have an actual document that sets such a condition for ANY Eastern Catholic church? Thanks.

Further, Eastern incense is not inherently "less cough provoking." There are plenty of blends on each side of the Church that are VERY cough provoking and not so cough provoking.


#17

Traditionally in the Byzantine tradition only a priest or deacon would use a censer with chains. Lay people would use only a hand censor. Even a deacon praying without a priest would use the hands censor.


#18

[quote="Urn, post:15, topic:334529"]
Both are correct. I have never heard a censor called a thurible in the East.

[/quote]

Censer. A censor is someone who tells you what you can read/see ;)


#19

[quote="MonkMoses, post:17, topic:334529"]
Traditionally in the Byzantine tradition only a priest or deacon would use a censer with chains. Lay people would use only a hand censor. Even a deacon praying without a priest would use the hands censor.

[/quote]

I don't know if that's true or not. What I am fairly sure of is that there is no prohibition of the laity using "a censer with chains."


#20

[quote="Urn, post:19, topic:334529"]
I don't know if that's true or not. What I am fairly sure of is that there is no prohibition of the laity using "a censer with chains."

[/quote]

There is in the Byzantine Churches.


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