Can one drop of holy water make other water holy?

So I have 2 questions 1: my mum got me some holy water back from the shrine at knock in Ireland and some holy oil and a st. Philamenas cord someone deliberately emptied my bottle of holy water and I didn’t even get to use it :frowning: there’s still a few drops in it if I pour some normal water in it will the other drops of holy water make it holy? My other question is what is st philamenas cord used for? I usually tie it around my waist the last one I had I wore for 3 years without takin it off (as it was tied) so today in mass I asked the priest to bless it for me he asked what it was and I told him he then asked me what it was for and I didn’t know I just wear it and don’t even know what it’s for can anyone tell me?

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There’s a certain ratio that has to be met (I can’t remember it off the top of my head), so with only a few drops you won’t get much more.

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No.

However, Knock holy water is no more efficacious than that of your usual parish, so you can just use that.

http://www.catholictradition.org/Saints/philomena3.htm

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If I am wrong someone please correct me…I had heard that you can add some water to existing holy water, but the existing holy water should be 51% more than the new water
added.

Here is a site about St. Philomena: It explains about the cord sacramental.

http://catholictradition.org/Saints/philomena3.htm

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That article really makes me feel proud to wear st philamenas cord thank you x

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I’ve done a little water research in my time.
I’ve heard interviews too - on Coast to Coast am radio.
There’s conspiracy theories etc -
One guy taped the word “ Love “ on a bottle of water -
And the next day it effected the water molecule structure.

He said - you can use the ‘love water’ - to drink -
And when it runs low - refill the container -
And the love water - prevails over - the regular water.

With that said…
I have a container of Holy water…
That’s 70 years old…
I have thought about adding my Holy water from Lourdes to it.

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:dizzy_face::confused:

I’m sorry someone did must a rude and inconsiderate thing!

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I know I found out who it was my 10 year old nephew had a dream the devil was trying to get him so he got up in the middle of the night and drank the bottle of holy water I was angry because it was from knock but I couldn’t argue with him

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You’re welcome Rosie. Thanks for letting me know.

Add what you have to other Holy Water and you’ll have 100% Holy Water in the amount you desire. As far as I know, there’s no prohibition on blending Holy Water from various places. Indeed, if you keep mixing more Holy Water into your Holy Water, you’ll never run out of the original Holy Water. I suppose you could even distill the Holy Water to remove impurities. Then, you would have extremely pure Holy Water. Heating it doesn’t take away it’s grace. But don’t let it freeze because then you’ll have Holy Ice which is mainly useless. :sunglasses:

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If you have 3 drops add one drop. Then after a moment add another. When you have 6 drops add 2. And so on.

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I remember going on a 5 day silent retreat to a Franciscan friary in North Wales, and stopping off at Saint Winifred’s ‘Holy Well’ - I collected around 10 UK gallons from a tap that sources the water - BUT in order to be ‘sure’, I had the ‘American’ priest, at the time attached to a French abbey, and who was leading the retreat - to bless it all, particularly with a mind to using it for the benefit of Holy Souls [dispensed it in local cemeteries].

What?! Why I haven’t found this on google If so why would they be selling still them at almost every holy shrine?

Can you provide a link to some info on that? Can someone verify this claim?
My google search yielded many St Philomena parishes still existing, and nothing about her being “disapproved by the Church”.

Can anyone verify this “disapproved” claim?

I’ve no idea why some churches still carry the name but my former parish in Caldwell Ohio had for many years a St. Philomena Catholic Church. It was changed to St. Michael after the following decrees.

On February 14, 1961, the Holy See ordered that the name of Saint Philomena be removed from all liturgical calendars that mentioned her.[1] This order was given as part of an instruction on the application to local calendars of the principles enunciated in the 1960 Code of Rubrics, which had already been applied to the General Roman Calendar. Section 33[1] of this document ordered the removal from local calendars of fourteen named feasts, but allowed them to be retained in places that had a special link with the feast. It then added: "However, the feast of Saint Philomena Virgin and Martyr (11 August) is to be expunged from any calendar whatever.

On March 29, 1961 the Sacred Congregation of Rites issued the following liturgical directive, which was recorded in the Acts of the Apostolic See: "But the Feast of St. Philomena, Virgin and Martyr (August 11th), should be removed from every calendar whatsoever."

See:

http://canonlawmadeeasy.com/2013/09/12/why-is-philomena-no-longer-considered-a-saint/

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That’s interesting. So she was never canonized a saint to begin with.
Thanks for the link to the article/info.

There is also a tradition that if one runs short of holy water, one can add unblessed water to blessed holy water and the contact between the two will make the unblessed water holy ( Fr. Brian Mullady, OP, https://www.hprweb.com/2018/09/questions-answered-65/.

So throwing a cup full in the Atlantic would make all the world’s oceans Holy Water? Come on, lets get real here. Is the water vapor from an evaporating Holy Water font Holy Vapor?

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As the great great Fr Mike once said:

Jesus didn’t get baptised for himself but to make all of the water in the river Holy for others.

More concerning is that your nephew is so terribly disturbed by the thought of demons. Maybe a trusted adult should talk to him…

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