Can public veneration be offered to a Blessed?


#1
  1. I had always thought that once the Church proclaimed someone a “Blessed” then that basically meant that they are a saint and in Heaven, but they aren’t canonized yet. I thought that since they already displayed a miracle, then they’re a saint. Is the reversal of a beatification possible? Could someone explain to me why 2 stages are necessary for someone to be proclaimed a “Saint”?

  2. This coming December, my parish’s youth group will go out on a retreat, and the theme of the retreat is the Blessed Trinity, and since we have relics of Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity, we were discussing putting her relics on display to a certain side of the chapel that we are having the retreat in, but I recently read that it is forbidden to publicly address prayers to a Blessed and put their relics up for exposition.

Blesseds may receive public veneration at the local or regional level, usually restricted to those dioceses or religious institutes closely associated with the person’s life. “Public veneration” in this use of the term doesn’t mean that it is done in public; rather,that it is an act done by the clergy, or delegated laity, in the name of the Church (Mass, Divine Office, images in churches etc.), even if done in private. On the other hand, “private veneration” means veneration by individuals or groups acting in their own name, even if done “in public.” While the Church restricts the public venration of Blesseds, Catholics are free to privately venerate them.

~ ewtn.com/johnpaul2/cause/process.asp

So does this mean that we cannot display relics of Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity during our retreat this December?

Thanks and God bless!


#2

[quote="Oumashta, post:1, topic:302276"]
1. I had always thought that once the Church proclaimed someone a "Blessed" then that basically meant that they are a saint and in Heaven, but they aren't canonized yet. I thought that since they already displayed a miracle, then they're a saint. Is the reversal of a beatification possible? Could someone explain to me why 2 stages are necessary for someone to be proclaimed a "Saint"?

  1. This coming December, my parish's youth group will go out on a retreat, and the theme of the retreat is the Blessed Trinity, and since we have relics of Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity, we were discussing putting her relics on display to a certain side of the chapel that we are having the retreat in, but I recently read that it is forbidden to publicly address prayers to a Blessed and put their relics up for exposition.

~ ewtn.com/johnpaul2/cause/process.asp

So does this mean that we cannot display relics of Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity during our retreat this December?

Thanks and God bless!

[/quote]

The display of relics of Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity doesn't automatically indicate that she is being venerated as a saint. Just indicate the fact that she is "Blessed" on a note near the relics. Interested viewers will understand the significance of the display. Possibly some will ask for her intercession and obtain the miracle needed for her canonization.


#3

Hmm.


#4

My understanding is that when someone is still a Blessed veneration is limited, usually to the area where they lived and/or the community they founded or were a part of.

Once someone is canonized they are venerated by the universal Church. The nature of the veneration doesn't change, but its scope does.

If your group has a particular devotion to Blessed Elizabeth I think it's perfectly appropriate to have her relics on display.


#5

Do you belong to a parish or diocese associated with Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity? I am wondering how it is your parish happens to have relics of Blessed Elizabeth.

I would think the very fact that you have her relics might mean your parish/diocese is one where local veneration could be acceptable.


#6

[quote="SMHW, post:5, topic:302276"]
Do you belong to a parish or diocese associated with Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity? I am wondering how it is your parish happens to have relics of Blessed Elizabeth.

I would think the very fact that you have her relics might mean your parish/diocese is one where local veneration could be acceptable.

[/quote]

Actually, it's not my parish who has them, it's me :p

I had received them from some Carmelite sisters, and figured that since the theme of our retreat is about the Trinity, we should talk about a Blessed with great devotion to God and speak about her spirituality, and that I should bring her relics with me to display during our prayers. I live in Hong Kong, and Bl. Elizabeth is from France, so it isn't local :D


#7

Public veneration of anyone not yet declared a full saint requires the bishop-ordinary’s permission, unless they’re on the liturgical calendar.

Blessed Theodore Romzha, for example, is on the Ruthenian Calendar (The calendar of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Church Sui Iuris of Pittsburgh - one of the 23 Eastern Catholic Churches in Communion with Rome), so within the Ruthenian context, his public veneration is permitted. The Romans in the Ukraine would need their local Ordinary’s permission for public veneration, but private veneration is perfectly fine.

Beattification includes the church acknowledging that they were worthy of private veneration.


#8

Not to divert this thread but Can icons be made for a blessed?


#9

[quote="hilde_the_dog, post:8, topic:302276"]
Not to divert this thread but Can icons be made for a blessed?

[/quote]

Yes.


#10

Oh, yes. I’ve an icon of Blessed Theodore, purchased from my home parish.

The parish has one of Blessed Theresa of Calcutta.

Liturgical commemoration propers have been written for many of the Martyrs of the 20th C who have been beattified.


#11

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