Can someone summerize "personal Lord and Savior"?

. . . . and does anyone have any history on this expression?

damn Protestants…that and “accepting Jesus into my heart”…lol j/k. Actually I’ve never actually researched that. Should be interesting.

[quote=mark a]. . . . and does anyone have any history on this expression?
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No history, but I have an insider’s perspective.

The expression is an attempt to identify the difference between knowing Christ person-to-person and just knowing “about” him.

If I studied some famous person a lot, I’d know so much about him I might almost be able to anticipate what he would do or say in a given situation. But I wouldn’t personally know him.

Many people just “go through the motions” of Christianity. They enter the church, they do their thing, they leave the church, but nothing has happened. They believe that Jesus is the savior of the world, but they do not know whether he has saved them personally.

But Jesus spoke of those who have passed from spiritual death into life (John 5:24). St. Paul spoke of those who have been saved by grace through faith (Ephesians 2:8). St. John wrote

He that hath the Son, hath life; and he that hath not the Son of God, hath not life. These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye might know that ye have eternal life. (1 John 5:12-13)
Although it is proper to speak of Christ as the savior of the world, it is still true that many in the world will be lost. Those who are saved, if they are of the age and mental competency to be accountable, are saved through a personal reationship with Jesus Christ.

Those who are saved, if they are of the age and mental competency to be accountable, are saved through a personal reationship with Jesus Christ.

Sounds like Protestant theology to me.

Still doesn’t answer the question on the history of this statement.

Funny thing happened at daily Mass this morning…our pastor was recalling an incident that happened when he went to visit his family. They had invited a couple of friends to dinner, and were sitting at the table discussing various topics…movies, cars, tv, etc…when suddenly in the middle of dinner, one of them asked “Have you all accepted Jesus Christ as your personal Lord and Saviour?”

The stopped eating. They thought it was kinda odd that it was thrown out there out of the blue.

No real point to this story, really…just thought it was kinda coincidental…you know, this topic…homily at daily Mass…

:confused: :confused:

Ok…I’ll be quiet now.

It’s all about the personal relationship feel-good kumbaya “Jesus is my buddy” stuff.

As Scott Hahn says, “I have a personal relationship with my mechanic.”

Most Protestants don’t realize it, but faithful Catholics have much, much more than a personal relationship with Jesus–we have an intimate Communion with Him :thumbsup: .

[quote=Genesis315]It’s all about the personal relationship feel-good kumbaya “Jesus is my buddy” stuff.

As Scott Hahn says, “I have a personal relationship with my mechanic.”

Most Protestants don’t realize it, but faithful Catholics have much, much more than a personal relationship with Jesus–we have an intimate Communion with Him :thumbsup: .
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The latter part is quite true, Genesis, but not the first line, by and large, not in my upbringing as a Baptist. It’s not nearly as shallow as that nor as overly-familiar. It is a profound and, for most, a life-changing and deeply serious thing. Jesus isn’t their buddy. That’s the liberal mainliners that think active gays make good ministers, that gays should marry, women be ordained etc. Give me a committed hard-shell Baptist over that lot any day.

[quote=JKirkLVNV]The latter part is quite true, Genesis, but not the first line, by and large, not in my upbringing as a Baptist. It’s not nearly as shallow as that nor as overly-familiar. It is a profound and, for most, a life-changing and deeply serious thing. Jesus isn’t their buddy. That’s the liberal mainliners that think active gays make good ministers, that gays should marry, women be ordained etc. Give me a committed hard-shell Baptist over that lot any day.
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Yeah, I don’t live in a hardcore Bible-belt. Most of the people I know who use that terminology have the mindset I described. I agree that not all Protestants are like that.

Here is a recent history:

[quote=Kevan]Although it is proper to speak of Christ as the savior of the world, it is still true that many in the world will be lost. Those who are saved, if they are of the age and mental competency to be accountable, are saved through a personal reationship with Jesus Christ.
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Coming from a cradle Catholic home, I was unfamiliar with the term “I have accepted Jesus as my personal Lord and Savior” until I was grown, and it still doesn’t feel quite comfortable.

The faith-story that was closer to me is this one below, which in one way seems the opposite from the need for a “personal” Jesus. Our Lord admonishes the disciple who asks for personal proof, and praises those who believe simply based on the Word.

John 20:24-29 Now Thomas, one of the twelve, called the Twin, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see in his hands the print of the nails, and place my finger in the mark of the nails, and place my hand in his side, I will not believe.” Eight days later, his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. The doors were shut, but Jesus came and stood among them, and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side; do not be faithless, but believing.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet believe.”

The biggest lack of comfort I have with the whole “I have accepted Jesus as my personal Lord and Savior” phrase, however, is not the “personal” part; it’s the “I have accepted” part. The reason is because I see lots of people who “accept” Jesus - it’s easy to sit on your butt and take a proferred gift. However, there are a whole lot fewer people who are willing to put forth the effort to transform their lives, as Paul admonishes us to do. It does little good to “accept” Jesus unless we also shoulder our responsibility to makes ourselves “acceptable” in return.

Rom 12:1-2 I appeal to you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that you may prove what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.

[quote=Catholic Dude]Here is a recent history:


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LOL chick tracts, haven’t seen those in a while!

[quote=Thetan]LOL chick tracts, haven’t seen those in a while!
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The thing that kills me is the option to check “NO”. IS that FUNNY or What? Would the person even waste their time?

And the Date is another funny one, well I guess I can see some purpose in that, but other than that yes they are a joke.

Personal Lord and Savior…some protestants believe it means you have a personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ…You pray and talk to him and ask him for personal guidance in your life. You are aware that he died for your personal sins…the ones that you have commited and the ones you will commit in the future. He lives within you.

Catholics that are serious have a relationship with Jesus…I know I certainly do. I say good morning Jesus…thank you for this day…and thank you for my blessings…and in times of turmoil I say Please Lord take this cup from me if at all possible…thy will be done otherwise.

The difference between Catholics and **some ** protestants, I think, is that there is a separation between G-d the Father and Jesus…they believe in the trinity, but forget to have a healthy fear of the Lord…The OSAS branch don’t fear for their sins, because they are clothed in Jesus’ sacrifice, and in effect during their personal judgement G-D will not see their sins…only the price that Jesus paid for them on Calvary, and they will be declared justified.

G-d is the Judge to OSAS believers, and Jesus personally saved them from judgement…and so when they die they will run up and hug Jesus, as he paid the price for them.

I on the other hand, feel like G-d the Father and Jesus are truly one. Jesus saved me from Adam and Eve’s original sin and opened up the possibility for me to please G-D of my own free will…I see G-D not as Judge, but as Father to me…and when I die I will be on my hands and knees begging for forgiveness and beating my chest while wailing…I Am not worthy…but only say the word and I shall be healed. I am held accountable for my sins…did I forgive? Did I love…even my enemy? Was I a good daughter? I as a Catholic cannot hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary. Thank You Jesus for opening the gates of Heaven for me…now I must walk the straight and narrow such as you taught!

[quote=Lillith] I as a Catholic cannot hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary. !
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I find this troubling, put this way. In the end, all we can really depend upon IS God’s Mercy, made manifest in the Passion, Death and Resurection of Jesus. The Council of Trent anathematized any teaching that we could add anything to what Jesus did for us on Calvary. We must, of course, be obedient to Him and follow Him and “work out our salvation with fear and trembling,” we have to make sure that our faith is operative and sufficient to save by our obedience, because that’s what we’re judged by. But in the end, all we can truly plead is God’s Mercy. Saint Ignatius, in his prayer *Anima Christi, *said this: “Good Jesus, hear me! Within Thy Wounds hide me!” I love that! I’m having it carved on my headstone.

[quote=JKirkLVNV]I find this troubling, put this way. In the end, all we can really depend upon IS God’s Mercy, made manifest in the Passion, Death and Resurection of Jesus. The Council of Trent anathematized any teaching that we could add anything to what Jesus did for us on Calvary. We must, of course, be obedient to Him and follow Him and “work out our salvation with fear and trembling,” we have to make sure that our faith is operative and sufficient to save by our obedience, because that’s what we’re judged by. But in the end, all we can truly plead is God’s Mercy. Saint Ignatius, in his prayer *Anima Christi, *said this: “Good Jesus, hear me! Within Thy Wounds hide me!” I love that! I’m having it carved on my headstone.
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I believe I understand what Lillith means by: “I as a Catholic cannot hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary.” She means that we don’t hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary, we are transformed by Jesus’ act on Calvary so that we are formed more and more into his likeness and brought more and more deeply into union with him, which is truly the kind of “personal relationship” that God desires for us.

[quote=Della]I believe I understand what Lillith means by: “I as a Catholic cannot hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary.” She means that we don’t hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary, we are transformed by Jesus’ act on Calvary so that we are formed more and more into his likeness and brought more and more deeply into union with him, which is truly the kind of “personal relationship” that God desires for us.
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To that, I can only say:amen:

[quote=mark a]. . . . and does anyone have any history on this expression?
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History? I don’t know.

I would summarize it as thus:

Christ is obviously the Saviour of the World.

However, not everyone puts their faith and trust in Him as such. But, if someone does put their faith and trust in Him, then He could be viewed as your personal Lord and Saviour. So, now it becomes personal rather than collective salvation.

Does that make sense?

Peace…

I have “gone through the motions” but guess what? Through the grace of God, going through the motions has awakened my faith.

Faith isn’t all about feelings, sometimes our faith seems on the weak and shallow side, sometimes we questiong it, all kinds of things happen to our faith. Going “through the motions” can bring back our faith ten-fold. Why give up the motions? Sometimes it’s all we have until Grace enfolds us again, sometimes the motions themselves bring Grace.

As to the origin of the phrase “personal relationship with Jesus”, the closest I could come to it after a google search was this:

Also emerging from the Church of England, yet no longer in full communion with it, are the Methodists and the Quakers. The United Methodist Church traces its roots to the dynamic preaching of John Wesley, a Church of England clergyman aided by his brother Charles, also a clergyman and a talented author of hymns. Wesley held long, unritualistic, outdoor services that climaxed when the individual was inspired to make a personal commitment to Christ.

So, it seems the idea, if not the exact phrase, originated in the Methodist movement.

[quote=Della]I believe I understand what Lillith means by: “I as a Catholic cannot hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary.” She means that we don’t hide behind Jesus’ act on Calvary, we are transformed by Jesus’ act on Calvary so that we are formed more and more into his likeness and brought more and more deeply into union with him, which is truly the kind of “personal relationship” that God desires for us.
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Thank you Della…sometimes the thoughts in my head don’t come out perfectly on paper…and that is exactly what I meant

:blessyou:

[quote=Lillith]Thank you Della…sometimes the thoughts in my head don’t come out perfectly on paper…and that is exactly what I meant

:blessyou:
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I hope I didn’t sound like I was picking at you, Lillith.

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