Can you ask for a miscarried child to intercede for you?

See title. Surely their souls are in heaven, so couldn’t they pray to God on your behalf?

EDIT: I see in this post that we don’t know for sure that they are in heaven, but it seems likely. So, for the sake of argument, let’s assume they are.

Perhaps someone more theologically learned than I am will give a better answer. But personally,I see nothing wrong with it.

Years ago, I discovered, in an old cemetery in a town where we no longer live, but where a number of my ancestors are buried, a gravestone marked “Baby (my last name)” I found another marked “Infant (last name of another branch of the family)” Apparently it was the custom (at least among the Irish) long ago to bury a stillborn or miscarried child with a marker like that. My children and I (now also including grandchildren) always now put flowers on their graves on Memorial Day. We also say a prayer in Gaelic because while I’m pretty sure the parents of one would have been exclusively English-speaking (from the Pale), there is a far better than even chance the parents of the other were Gaelic speaking (County Mayo).

I can understand if one felt something had not developed within oneself, that this soul might understand one’s suffering and intercede. I haven’t read anything in this regard. There is nothing wrong in asking, I suppose; at least their existence is being recognized, which can make one feel good to have that connection.

I cannot begin to understand why innocent children - born or unborn - should be excluded from the Communion of Saints (which seems to be a neglected doctrine).

Simply yes

It’s my belief that our Holy Mother is the caregiver of all miscarried and aborted babies. From the instant of the baby’s conception they have a soul, from the instant of conception we are carrying a life in our wombs. I have had a miscarriage 34 yrs ago and I named that baby and I know in my heart that he/she is with our Divine and Holy Mother. I hope this answer helps you.

I have generally prayed for miscarried, or aborted children, rather asking for their intercession.

There was a group here in Mexico that even had us praying that Christ would baptize such children in the afterlife. For a time, I prayed that prayer as well, but now I am unsure so just pray other prayers, instead.

Yes. My son being one great prayer delivery person.

Because we are called to use faith AND reason.

There is no need for doctrine in this area.

Your reasoning seems quite logical.

Since all persons are responsible for the answer to God’s invitation. Those that didn’t get a chance to learn from the miriad of aspects on earth, would still have to be presented with truth to make a decision. That information would logically come from a Holy source after death (since evil is not true - ‘father of lies’). So to presume heaven is reasonable and logical.

Though in our limits, the smallprint should read ‘impossible to officially know until after death’.

I’d just like to say that we are not body’s with a soul WE ARE SOULS with a body. It doesn’t matter what our body looks like, it can be a baby in the womb or could have breathed our air. That soul could have a body that works great yet another soul has a body with missing limbs or limbs that don’t work. The body is the shell that our souls use to get where we need to be and that includes here on earth or miscarried or a aborted and brought back to our Lord.

It’s not neglected. It’s simply unknown. The Church merely admits that God did not reveal to us the answer to this particular question and that she simply does not know.

I agree but innocent children belong to the Communion of Saints and cannot be regarded as destined for Hell.

Your reasoning seems quite logical.

Since all persons are responsible for the answer to God’s invitation. Those that didn’t get a chance to learn from the miriad of aspects on earth, would still have to be presented with truth to make a decision. That information would logically come from a Holy source after death (since evil is not true - ‘father of lies’). So to presume heaven is reasonable and logical.

Though in our limits, the smallprint should read ‘impossible to officially know until after death’.

:thumbsup:

This is where - especially for the parents - faith in God’s infinite love preempts knowledge…

As I have just pointed out, faith in God’s infinite love preempts knowledge. The atheist Sartre observed that it is impossible to sit on the fence. We shouldn’t leave the parents in the agony of suspense but with the firm hope and confidence that they will be reunited with their children.

:thumbsup: That is the right perspective, Anna.

As comforting as it is, we simply do not know. We can sit on the fence because the Church does. God’s infinite love is only one part of the equation. The other part is the absolute necessity of baptism for salvation. It’s not coldhearted to simply admit that we do not know and just do as the Church does: entrust such souls to God’s mercy. But we cannot presume that they are saints because the Church doesn’t. We simply do not know.

There is a difference between admitting that we do not know and living with the firm hope and confidence that we shall be reunited with our children. I shall never forget the angelic face of my stillborn baby daughter… With God all things are possible.

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