Can you reform a sex offender?


#21

Execute them. They deserve worse, but the best we can do is send them to their final Judgement. :mad:


#22

[quote=Seven Sorrows]I should hope you can reform them, or they will all be going to hell!!!

Anyone can change, but are we really going to spend the time, the love, the money and the spirituality on it…probably not
[/quote]

Be careful whom you send to hell. The last I heard only God had that power.

I too believe that all things are possible for him that believes. And if someone really has the desire to change God will provide.

I don’t know the mind of sex offenders but my grandfather was one of those. He molested my little sister and she didn’t tell anyone until after he was died. She said it was such a relief to know he was dead. She was happy. I think she felt safe even though she was already a grown woman.

When I asked her why she didn’t come forth she said she was ashamed and didn’t think anyone would believe her. :frowning:

I hope grandpa is not in hell. :frowning:


#23

[quote=Liberalsaved]Greatly depends. People assume all sex offenders are violent predators, when a good deal of them simply violated statuatory rape laws, sometimes with only a single year difference. I’ve seen some idiotic laws that make no distinction between those people and violent rapists.
[/quote]

That’s a very good point!

I have some experience in this field. The Police officers I have had dealings with say that the advancements that have been made in understanding and subsequently reducing these crimes against the innocent are only possible in an atmosphere of co-operation. That is that this topic is discussed in an open manner, and that abusers are not sought out and subjected to vigilanteism (as much as that might appeal).

What do members see this sort of afflication as I wonder?


#24

It may be that this is a loaded question.

Consider that there are some overweight people who decide to lose weight, actually lose it, and keep it off. They never appear in the statistics about obesity. Whereas many people who do not succeed do show up in the statistics.

What the “sex offenders” seem to be (read the other posts) are people who cannot control their urges.

The big part of the question is how do “normal people” control their urges? So, there seems to be a bigger picture here that we’re dealing with. Maybe everybody knows this already and it didn’t need to be said.

I think this shows how much work needs to be done by clinical researchers. It seems that heavy drug therapy may be required to control sex offenders, until there is a real breakthrough in reforming them.


#25

Hi Fighting Fat in England there is a free phone line , for people who think they might abuse children, we also have some thing called Circles of Accountability ,This is a project where abusers live in the coummunity and are monitered by a large group of people , if they as much go to where they are banned they are returned to prison , its been found this is the only way to protect children yours michaelmac ps it cost the State £40,000 to keep one sex offernder in prison , at the start of the programn its about £50,000 , then decrececs to about £5,000


#26

Not sure how I should reply to this…my ex husband is a sex offender serving time. He was not abused as a child, in fact he had everything he ever wanted given to him as a child, his parents spoiled him. His parents were very devout Catholics and sent him to Catholic schools. So what happened to him? Somehow he learned to be a manipulative liar. I won’t list his sins or offenses, God knows what they are and I’ll let God judge him. I really do hope that when he gets out he’ll lead a moral life and stay out of prison but the statistics are not in his favor.


#27

[quote=Crumpy]What the “sex offenders” seem to be (read the other posts) are people who cannot control their urges.

The big part of the question is how do “normal people” control their urges? So, there seems to be a bigger picture here that we’re dealing with. Maybe everybody knows this already and it didn’t need to be said.

I think this shows how much work needs to be done by clinical researchers. It seems that heavy drug therapy may be required to control sex offenders, until there is a real breakthrough in reforming them.
[/quote]

Crumpy, I think you’ve got to the key here. The question is not: Can sex offenders change? The question is: Are we, as a society, willing to let them?

The people who able to “control their urges,” as you say, are many. Anyone who thinks that it is particularly “abnormal” to find a 15-year old girl attractive is ignorant. The term “pedophilia” is a term that we use to alienate people. But if anyone attracted to a 15-year-old girl (or boy) is a pedophile, then we live in a nation full of pedophiles.

We need to accept that aberrent – even dangerous – desires are normal. Yes, that’s what I said: normal. Most people, at some point, have them. Does that mean there’s nothing wrong with them? No. Does that mean we ought to, as Christians, communicate our love and sympathy for people with these attractions? Absolutely.

Do we do that? No way. We rightly despise the sin of child molestation, but we wrongly alienate anyone tempted to the sin. Read your Catechism, people: temptation is not sin.

For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet was without sin. Hebrews 4:15

We need a way for the abusers to see that other people have had the temptation, but did not sin. Until we have that, we have failed to communicate to them the possibility of redemption.

“All the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put Humpty Dumpty back together again.” Oh, yeah? Well Jesus can.


#28

<<Can you change a sex offender’s behaviour patterns? Are they genetically programed or do they simply make sexual mistakes?>>

I can do nothing for tem. GOD can do EVERYTHING for tem.
Anne


#29

According to Fr Benedict Groeschel, men who have sex with minors, at any age, is not curable. He believes it can be controlled, but not cured. Although he himself, as a psychologist, used to believe they were curable. His opinion differs now…as much as he has compassion on a person who has committed such evil when they repent of their sin, he has more compassion on the victims. Untold damage is perpetuated forever and forever…


#30

[quote=Shoshana]… it can be controlled, but not cured.
[/quote]

*What * can be controlled? If the action of abusing a child can be controlled, then how is that not a cure – or at least a rehabilitation? And if you aren’t controlling the action, then what exactly do you mean by the word “control?”


#31

[quote=Prodigal_Son]*What *can be controlled? If the action of abusing a child can be controlled, then how is that not a cure – or at least a rehabilitation? And if you aren’t controlling the action, then what exactly do you mean by the word “control?”
[/quote]

An alcoholic might be able to control his urge to drink and not take a drink for long periods of time. But then maybe he falls off the wagon.

Same thing with the sex offender… maybe he can control his urge to molest for some time… but what happens when HE falls off the wagon? I’m not willing to risk even one child to that.

Being able to control one’s vices isn’t 100%. People slip all the time… what’s so awful about the sex offender is they take an innocent child with them.


#32

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