Canada approves prescription heroin in effort to combat opioid crisis


#1

Canada approves prescription heroin in effort to combat opioid crisis. abcn.ws/2cK7ELA


#2

I suppose it isn’t too different in methodology from the nicotine patch. If it reduces the harm from adulterated supplies and is part of medical supervised program then why not?


#3

I think this will prove beneficial.

It is time we started adopting a curative approach to “illicit” drug use and addiction by moving the whole topic out of the punitive realm of crime and into that of healthcare.

This will ensure better well-being for the addicts as they recover, rather than resorting to injecting themselves via needles infected with HIV or some other ghastly back-street mechanism.

The opposite approach, a “war on drugs” pursued with ruthless legislation and policing of users, is counter-intuitive and places a needles burden of expenditure on the country at large. It only serves to empower cartels and dealers on the black market, not to mention incriminating the recovering addicts themselves. If one is addicted, one will strive to acquire the drug any way one can - even at great danger to one’s life.

Let’s heal people, not incriminate them. And let’s save money in the process.


#4

Legalized addiction with the government as the enabler and the pusher. How grand.


#5

Making it a criminal matter has proved more harmful though.


#6

It also means they can adjust down their stats of illicit users :thumbsup:


#7

Eliminates the risk of adulterated drugs, massively reduces overdose risk, decreases the negative health effects of dirty needles, reduces money flowing to drug traffickers, breaks users out of the daily grind of hustling and crime to fund their habits, makes it much easier for users to hold down jobs and care for families, gives social services daily contact with people to facilitate drug and mental health treatment, saves the medical system the massive costs of emergency treatment, gives users a stable framework on which to rebuild their lives. Grand indeed.


#8

:shrug: Yeah, because MDs writing scripts for pain pills has sure helped the narcotic addiction rate in this country. Also, heroin users aren’t known for being able to be reliably employed. Something about people not wanting employees coming to work high. :rolleyes: Thats why here you go on METHADONE to get OFF the Heroin.


#9

Your sarcasm isn’t really warranted, especially if you had read article. They’re not writing prescriptions for free heroin for anyone off the street, they’re prescribing it “for the treatment of chronic relapsing opioid dependence in certain individual cases”. These are not people in danger of becoming addicted, they are people who have been addicted for a long time. They’re people who have been on and off the drug, whose attempts at kicking it have not worked and who likely have overdosed multiple times already. Treating these people with controlled amounts of unadulterated heroin is not going to cause a wave of new addictions.

Also, heroin users aren’t known for being able to be reliably employed. Something about people not wanting employees coming to work high.

Many users are great employees until their tolerance gets too high to handle on their wages. They often lose their jobs they become unreliable due to all the time spent meeting dealers and eventually having to find new sources of income. I’ve worked with several users, and they can handle it until they can’t. The people Canada will be treating haven’t been able to handle it for awhile.

Thats why here you go on METHADONE to get OFF the Heroin.

The people who will receive this treatment are the chronic relapsers that didn’t respond to methadone treatment, that didn’t respond to buprenorphine. They’re people for whatever reason can’t or won’t respond to drug therapy or rehab. The choice is to let them die in the street or give them a chance. The government didn’t approve this treatment for kicks, they approved it because pilot programs got people back into work, back into school, and back with their families, all thanks to medically provided diacetylmorphine.


#10

This has a major downside, and a semi-benefit.

The downside is that the people will be addicted to heroin still.

The benefit would be decreased criminal activity (and hopefully decreased robberies.)


#11

And made the prison industry addicted to government money.


#12

Hi Imachine,
Won’t the ever increasing tolerance by an individual user lead to a demand for greater controlled quantities from the doctor and, eventually due to theincreased tolerance leads to increased demand relationship, to death?
Along this line, what will prevent addicts from also using “non-controlled” heroin to supplement the “controlled heroin” a/


#13

This is ultimately what the US will have to do imo, eventually cities and states can only go so long being in the heroin epidemics before something has to be done to at least slow it down, all the efforts by law enforcement so far have failed, so, its only common sense to try something else.

They should have thought about this back when they cracked down on people getting opiate painkillers from their doctors, all they did was pave the way for hundreds of thousands of people to become heroin addicts, and surprise surprise RIGHT when these laws went into effect, ‘mysteriously’ heroin was suddenly available everywhere, and cheap. LOL That just screams conspiracy and/or collusion.

If someone is going to be an addict, it is far ‘better’ for them to at least be using opiate pain pills, made in controlled labs, by pharmaceutical companies, you know what you are getting, but with heroin, Lord knows whats in batch to batch, no way to tell if its going to kill you instantly or not.


#14

Kind of makes one wonder whether Phillipine President Duterte’s plan to simply assassinate drug dealers might be the only way to stop this odious trade.


#15

More people need to read up on the prescription drug “Suboxone”.

I was never addicted to heroin, but I did become a chronic user of prescription pain killers like Vicodin. The withdrawal was absolute hell. My understanding is that heroin withdrawal is even worse.

I was prescribed suboxone and put on a two year regimen. It’s a
Miracle drug. It prevents withdrawal symptoms and allows you to taper down on the drug until cessation causes minimum discomfort. I have been off for years now.

The problem is it’s incredibly expensive. It was $50 with insurance for one month. Its thousands of dollars a year without insurance. It’s apparently very effective for heroin addiction as well.


#16

Interesting. Seems a lot better than prescribing Methadone, which is extremely addictive itself, or, certainly, heroin.


#17

Not really, unless you’re already open to extrajudicial killing for some reason.


#18

Buprenorphine is also addictive.


#19

This is True. And unfortunately, most doctors can prescribe it just because they took a seminar on the drug that lasted an hour.

But there are many excellent doctors out there who can successfully taper. The benefit of suboxone over methodone is that it doesn’t intrude into ones life. No having to go to a clinic every single morning, which I’m sure can cause problems with an employer.


#20

I have been on Suboxone for about 2 years now and I agree, it is a miracle drug, as my doctor says, if it stops the person from going out and using heroin, its a success.

Everyone made it a big story recently when a large grocery chain stated they were going to start giving out Narcan without a prescription, well, imo, they need to do the same thing with Suboxone, heck, go down and hand it out on street corners, let addicts see what its like and see they will not want to use heroin if they take it.

Its a win win in my opinion.


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