Canadian bishop worries euthanasia could be seen as moral obligation


#1

Canadian bishop worries euthanasia could be seen as moral obligation dlvr.it/NFmXgz


#2

The frightening question is who says it is a moral obligation? The individual, or the State?

There was a time in my state, and most others here in the US, where one didn’t have to wear a seat belt in a car if one chose not to. Then, not wearing a seat belt became a punishable offense, although it could not be the primary reason one was cited for the infraction. It had to be discovered when a driver was pulled over by the police for a totally different reason. Now, the legislatures have enacted into law that is is a primary offense and one can be cited for, and punished for, not wearing one’s seat belt. Sure, wearing a belt is a smart idea, but this little “law” is an example of how the state encroaches on one’s freedom gradually when we aren’t looking. The seat belt law was sold to us as something that benefited all citizens

Will they sell euthanasia the same way here in the US?

Just sayin’


#3

Except,seat belts save lives,in most cases.Euthansia always ends a life.Not a good analogyIMO
It is already being sold as a right on the spectrum of abortion.This initiative passed here in Colo this past election cycle.:frowning:


#4

It is up to the person to decide. I am for it, I guess no big surprise there.


#5

Jeanne: the use of the seat belt law was to illustrate the insidious way laws can be passed in the country. Not the nature of the law itself. Regardless of your view on seat belts (and I agree with you), our freedom was taken from us on that issue gradually by others. All I’m saying is could the same happen with euthanasia?.

Remember, “all evil needs to triumph is for good men to do nothing”


#6

Like an Overton Window shift.


#7

Yes,if the Democrats have their way per thevACA there will be death panels.
Let me add,the fact that the right to die initiative is gaining momentum,it will start out as a personal choice but will evolve into a mandatory action.


#8

In light of the recent story about the patient from Holland (I believe), it is sobering. I’ve wondered if this is how I will go out, considering I will probably succumb to Alzheimer’s.


#9

I will, as well.


#10

I see the problems and potential social obligation, but I don’t think it’s realistic to believe it’ll be made an obligation by law. I figure that by looking at abortion, which is a similar evil. Liberals have paraded about the right to choose and how no one can tell a woman what to do, but they’ve also not said “You must abort your baby in these cases.” Societal pressures lead to some families pressuring their relatives to get an abortion, but I can’t see a scenario coming up where abortions are forced on a woman against her will in America. So I see it with euthanasia that they’ll probably fight for the ‘right’ to euthanasia, but there’d be an uproar at forced euthanasia. (The image of a crying grandchild weeping at their grandparent being euthanized against the entire family and said grandparent’s will would be a huge argument against it in legal terms.)


#11

We did sterilize people against their will in the past. I don’t see us going down that road currently, though.


#12

Seat belts aren’t the driver for euthanasia. It’s this dopey notion that you can end your life as long as you don’t harm someone else. Obviously some of these folks have never dealt with a suicide in their family.

It’s being done through health care (what else, it works for abortion), which would mean that euthanasia maybe administered to family members without their consent.


#13

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