Cannes 'burkini' ban: What do Muslim women think?


#1

BBC:

Cannes ‘burkini’ ban: What do Muslim women think?

The mayor of Cannes in France has banned full-body swimsuits, or “burkinis”, from the French city’s beaches. David Lisnar issued the ordinance on the grounds that burkinis, which are popular with Muslim women, “could risk disrupting public order while France was the target of terrorist attacks”.
He also said burkinis were a “symbol of Islamic extremism” which are “not respectful of [the] good morals and secularism” upon which the French state was founded.
Muslim women from around the world have been quick to react to news of the ban.

“This is just an Islamophobic attack on Muslim women in Cannes,” Aysha Ziauddin, who lives in Norfolk, told the BBC.
"The burkini allows me the freedom to swim and go on the beach, and I don’t feel I am compromising my beliefs for that.
"No-one has ever told me to wear it - it’s my own choice.
"How is a woman on a beach swimming in a wetsuit with her head covered a symbol of Islamic extremism?
"Even Nigella Lawson wore one!

[snip]

“I don’t have a burkini, but I do swim wearing a headscarf, tracksuit bottoms and long T-shirt,” Kerry Amr told the BBC.
Kerry, who lives in the town of Telford in the west of England, converted to Islam eight years ago, and although she chooses not to wear a burkini, she believes women should be free to choose what to wear when they go to the beach.
“I think [the ban is] slightly ridiculous,” she said.
"In Victorian times swimmers would wear long baggy trousers, full tops and swimming caps and no-one blinked an eye!
"I fail to see how a woman wishing to cover her body with a particular style of costume whilst swimming can possibly be a symbol of Islamic extremism.

Only the French could make modesty a crime.


#2

I think it’s incredibly discriminatory. I agree, it is punishing women for modesty. What a poor mayor. I am surprised there isn’t more outrage.


#3

I don’t find it outrageous at all. France doesn’t share our heritage of Puritanism.

Then again, these bans don’t make much sense. If someone meant to do people harm, they **wouldn’t **dress so as to draw attention. Why ban someone from **voluntarily **wearing distinctive garb?

ICXC NIKA


#4

No burkinis allowed, but topless women are still permitted on the beach at Cannes.

From a May 2016 news story

Supermodel Heidi Klum made the most of France’s relaxed nudity laws on Wednesday when she gave the paparazzi an eyeful and bared her breasts on the beach.

The German star, 42, took a day off from the glitz and glamour of the Cannes Film Festival red carpet to hit the Gulf of Saint-Tropez with her boyfriend, Vito Schnabel, and opted for the topless look.

Klum shielded her face from the sun with a hat and dark sunglasses, but there was little on underneath - only a skimpy string bikini bottom.

torontosun.com/2016/05/20/heidi-klum-topless-in-cannes-for-beach-day


#5

Of course it is. And there is another law in France which prohibits women from wearing a head scarf in certain places. This law is directed against Muslim women who try to dress modestly in public.


#6

Because they presume that anyone who doesn’t think as they do must not be thinking for themselves and needs to be “saved” from those who’ve “brainwashed them”. I should go to Cannes wearing a bikini and flash my rolls around. They would beg me to put on a birquini.


#7

:rotfl:


#8

If Burquinis are banned Catholic nuns should be banned from wearing habits.
PS: I am a catholic who loves to see nuns in habits


#9

Have you not caught on that there is a war on?

You’re concerned about your/their twisted idea of modesty while France is concerned about survival.

It’s too bad the feminists have gone so crazy with abortion and financially taking women away from the home because it makes the other side responds just as crazy with ideas that women are immodest if they show their neck or hair. Perhaps next you’ll be agreeing with female castration because it ensures their chastity.


#10

Nuns aren’t killing people. They and their ideas don’t need to be oppressed.

There’s a war on and people are dying!


#11

How does banning the Burkini favor French survival?

Someone who is an Islamist in France will be one, whether they wear a Burkini/headscarf/veil, etc, or not. And if they are traditionally garbed, they will be easier to keep eyes on.

This law doesn’t favor French survival and it isn’t an attack on “modesty” (as in fear of the body). It’s a fear reaction that doesn’t make any sense.

ICXC NIKA


#12

Because a woman and her life is not as important as maintaining discipline in the ranks of the radical.

Did you know that during the Viet Nam war, they would find diaries on the communists? They would reveal info about the soldier, but the diary was a tool of enforcing communism and so therefore more important than the chance that info would be found by the enemy.

You have to control your own soldiers first.

And why do you think these women are innocent because they openly show their faith. So have all the terrorists!! They’re not being secretive about their religion. We, by Obamas policy, have just refused to acknowledge what’s in front of our faces. They even tried to blame the Orlando shooting on Christians when he said he did it for Isis!! Crazy. And Suicidal.

What’s the word for when a country commits suicide?


#13

There is pressure on these people to be radical Muslims. Radical Muslims are killing people in every continent in the name of religion. France is releasing the pressure on them. Which is the kind thing to do.

And the woman are garbed for the desert, not the men. So how can you keep a better eye on them?


#14

Yes, we must keep in mind the cultural and legal differences between France and the United States. We came out of the American Revolution, they came out of several different conflicts and they were not a “melting pot” like we are until recently (perhaps the 1960s or so).

However, it can certainly be seen as discriminatory within the bounds of reason.

I’m not defending the ban at all, but nuns are a more familiar sight in the Western world with our long-instated traditions of Christianity and its derived traditions (e.g., monasticism with monks and nuns).

Also, nuns have never posed a threat to the Western world or Christendom. Ever. France is concerned (and it is reasonable in their eyes, too) with maintaining what they have built, as every country does, and this is simply how the mayor of Cannes tries to do this.

Again, however, I’m not defending the ban and I do not think that a ban is going to prevent terrorism or help French people survive their plights. (These are my claims, not the stuff above; those are responses.)


#15

How dare France try to preserve their French culture. It’s kind of amusing how much more outrage this generates than, say, Saudi Arabia beheading homosexuals.


#16

Yes. Sometimes, it is hard to tell (especially in today’s world with refugees) whether it is colonization or (im)migration. The case of the Western world is confusing when people are no longer assimilating into their new country.


#17

Roman Catholic nuns are seen at public beaches wearing fully covering nun’s outfits. Why is it OK for a Roman Catholic nun to go to the beach, but it is not OK for a Muslim woman to wear a burkini? A Muslim woman should be able to wear a burkini or a headscarf if she wants to. What the secularist wants is for women to show as much skin as possible and if you don’t, you go to jail?


#18

But I thought secularism traditionally consists of being “progressive” and “tolerant”? Also, post #14 describes my views on this in a fuller, more detailed manner (at the last paragraph especially).


#19

I have no problems with nuns from any tradition doing as you suggest or Muslim women in burkinis and fail to see the point of this ban.


#20

Actually I find it hilarious that the country is attempting to ban women wearing burkinis. It’s droll. Culture is not fixed in aspic and changes over time, this is a pointless and rather silly ban.


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