Canon Law, Sharia Law, Other Traditions


#1

With Australia planning to pass laws requiring Catholic priests to break the Seal of Confession, I can see our (Catholic) side of this, and Canon Law, but what about other religions like Muslim’s Sharia Law or the laws of other faiths? If Catholic priests steadfastly adhere to the Seal, won’t that just snowball into other faiths breaking laws of their government, citing freedom of religion too?


#2

Is this just a duplicate of your post in catholic news?

Can you give a specific example of how or what this would look like?


#3

I would hope so.


#4

Yeah. For some reason it wasn’t showing up on the list for “all categories”and it couldn’t be seen unless posters specifically went to Catholic News. I’ll see if I can delete the first post.


#5

Sometimes computers just don’t cooperate! Can you give an example of a rule or law of another religion that could be addressed. All I am thinking of are rather extreme.


#6

How so? We have the freedom of religion here, but say, for example, a Satanist wants the same freedoms as a Catholic (not that I know anything about Satanism), if Catholic priests are allowed to adhere to the Seal and then someone from another religion wants to break the law citing “freedom of Religion”, then what?


#7

Sorry, I know little to nothing about Sharia law and other religions. The point I was trying to make is freedom of religion extends to more than just Catholics and if we’re forced to break the Seal (and I think we may be headed that way), what about other religious practices?


#8

In countries where freedom of religion is a right, I surely can see the state pushing this as far as possible if it is not defended initially and every time something of this nature is suggested, for every religion.


#9

It might, but Catholic social teaching actually rejects religious liberty in favor of limited religious tolerance. In our modern Western world of separation of Church and state (also a notion not accepted by the Church), it’s not really possible to implement. Let’s pray for society to become Christian again.


#10

I don’t think I understand.


#11

That’s what freedom of religious means. So yes.


#12

Australia’s laws are changing, some as soon as October where priests will be required to break the seal if he believes a penitent has committed a crime.


#13

yes it does.

It doesn’t matter what the law says, priest will not break the seal.

And, other religions should not be compromised either.

I don’t understand what you think the problem is here.


#14

Google has information titled “priests who have broken the Seal.”


#15

I think the problem is that some priests, bound by Canon law AND government laws will opt to break the Seal rather than go to jail or pay a hefty fine.

Then, in order for the government to know, for certain, that a priest hasn’t broken the seal to report a crime I’ve read about (I think even on CAF) police using sting operations. That sounds like a huge infringement on Catholicism as we’ve always known it to be.


#16

The Church doesn’t support religious liberty, but supports the state in allowing limited religious tolerance when necessary to maintain social order.


#17

So a priest would, or would not break the seal if a penitent committed a crime and the government required priests to start breaking the Seal?


#18

No, what I’m saying merely relates to the topic of religious liberty or religious tolerance in general, rather than specifically to the issue of the Seal.

The state cannot oblige a priest to break the Seal, in accordance with the principle of higher law. Divine law come first and is binding with no exceptions. Then there is human law, divided into canon law and civil law, and the laws of the Church take precedence over the laws of the state.


#19

No,
Not that.

Your comments about religous freedom for other groups is what I don’t understand.


#20

Google also has information on “my next door neighbor the alien”.


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