Canons regarding your diocese

I am looking for information on diocesan enrollment. For example, what are the rules regarding moving from one diocese to another (perhaps you moved for a job)? Or, if you physically live in one diocese but regularly or semi-regularly attend Mass at a parish in another diocese, which diocese do you belong to? Who is your Bishop?

See Canon 102 regarding domicile.

Can. 102 §1 Domicile is acquired by residence in the territory of a parish, or at least of a diocese, which is either linked to the intention of remaining there permanently if nothing should occasion its withdrawal, or in fact protracted for a full five years.

§2 Quasi*domicile is acquired by residence in the territory of a parish, or at least of a diocese, which is either linked to the intention of remaining there for three months if nothing should occasion its withdrawal, or in fact protracted for three months.

§3 Domicile or quasi*domicile in the territory of a parish is called parochial; in the territory of a diocese, even if not in a parish, it is called diocesan.

You are a member of a parish – under canon law, it’s generally the parish where you live (see Can. 518), unless for some reason you belong to a personal parish (which it sounds like you don’t). This applies even if you never attend Mass at “your” parish. And your parish belongs to a diocese, so you, by extension, belong to that diocese as well.

That’s pretty much a long way of saying, it’s whatever diocese you live in, even if you like going to Mass across the state line. I hope someone’ll correct me if I’m wrong.

For the canon law, see here, canons 100-107.

See here for a commentary.

I don’t understand what you mean by “rules” regarding moving from one diocese to another. There aren’t any rules. One may live wherever one wishes.

You belong to, and are under the particular law of, the territory (diocese) in which you have a domicile. (Canons 13, 100-106).

The Bishop of the territory in which you have a domicile. (Canons 13, 100-106).

I don’t think you enroll in a Diocese, you register in a parish. You are automatically a member of the parish in whose geographic territory you reside, and by extension, of the Diocese to which that parish belongs. You are free to participate, attend Mass, support, volunteer at any parish in the surrounding area, even if, as in our former home, you are on the borderline with another Diocese. For practical reasons, if you are going to ask the Parish for services and sacraments you should support that parish, financially and with your time and talent. In Ohio we supported 2 parishes, the one in our own diocese where we lived, and the other one in the next diocese where our children went to school, actually closer to our house, because none of the parishes in our residence diocese had schools at that time.

if you want to go to the canon law level, the pastor of your territorial parish and your territorial bishop have authority over all Catholics in their territory, so are within their rights in expecting you to ask permission before receiving sacraments in another diocese, or parish.

Suppose you lived in Diocese of City A and you moved to the Diocese of City B. Is there anything other than registering in your new parish for the transference (like seeking permission from your old Bishop to be under the new Bishop)? Note, I am speaking only of lay men and women and not priests or religious (who obviously have a different set of rules).

I don’t believe registration is relevant to canon law, at least this scenario. You could register in your new parish 6 months before you move, or you could fail to register at all when you move. It still appears that canonically you become a member of the new parish and diocese at the moment you move your residence. It also appears that if moving to your new abode takes a month (e.g. you’re sailing across the Pacific), you remain a member of the old parish during your trek.

No. You do not have to ask permission from your bishop to move.

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