Captured and put to death by fire

St Protus and St Hyacinth

Celebrated on September 11th

St Hyacinth is notable among Roman martyrs because his grave and epitaph were found intact in recent times, with his charred remains. The discovery was made in 1845 in the cemetery of the Basilla on the old Salarian Way in Rome. Part of the tomb of Protus was also discovered - confirming ancient legends which said that the saints died together.

It is said that the pair were servants of Eugenia, the Christian daughter of a prefect of Egypt. She fled with them from Egypt to Rome, but they were all captured and put to death by fire during the reign of the Emperor Valerian.
(from ICN)

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I can’t really take the name Hyacinth seriously. Hyacinth Bucket (Bouquet) from the BBC programme Keeping Up Appearances comes to mind.

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It is an honorable name.

Saints Hyacinth and Protus, pray for us.

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Hyacinth…no. But SAINT Hyacinth - most definitely.

Sts Hyacinth and Protus pray for us.

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Up until this morning I actually thought Hyacinth was female . :upside_down_face:

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Martyrdom is the seed of Christianity. St Protus and Hyacinth, pray for us.

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I wonder how many of my fellow Americans would be similarly surprised to find out St. Hilary was male. Hilary of Poitiers

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There is also Hilaire Belloc, and St. Pope Hilarius.

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