Cardinal Dolan consults the bishops regarding proceeding with the cause for canonization of Dorothy Day

Cardinal Dolan consults the bishops (required action) regarding proceeding with the cause for canonization of Dorothy Day


twitter.com/BishopSample/status/268437487943311361

Dorothy Day should be saint!:thumbsup:

Franciscan secular. She certainly walked the walk.

Sincere question here.
I have heard that she made the comment that she didnt want to be officially canonized because she sought it as a wast of money (it takes A LOT of money to get someone canonized I have learned with my following the cause for Fulton Sheen)

She said she would rather that that money be given to the poor.

Does anyone know if this is true? Was this her wish?

Actually, the following quote has been attributed to her: “Don’t call me a saint. I don’t want to be dismissed so easily.”

Found a good article just written yesterday that has an interview with her biographer in light of these past few days…

americamagazine.org/blog/entry.cfm?blog_id=2&entry_id=5492

I find Dorothy Day’s life and work to be very inspiring. I am sure that, like with any other cause for sainthood, the Church will investigate carefully and if they declare her a Saint it will be at the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

patheos.com/blogs/kathrynlopez/2012/11/cardinal-dolans-rightward-march

The Times notes:

[quote]“I am convinced she is a saint for our time,” Cardinal Dolan said at the bishops’ meeting. She exemplifies, he said, “what’s best in Catholic life, that ability we have to be ‘both-and’ not ‘either-or.’ ”

It notes, however:

Describing for reporters at the bishops’ meeting Day’s life as a young woman, Cardinal Dolan offered a litany of concerns: “Sexual immorality, religious searching, pregnancy out of wedlock and an abortion.” But, he said, after her conversion, she not only flourished, but she also became an icon “for everything right about the dignity of the human person and the sanctity of human life.”

[/quote]

Dorothy Day’s conversion, and life post-conversion, is certainly an inspirational story reminiscent of St. Augustine. However, I’m afraid that story could get lost, and be eclipsed by her pre-conversion life of sin and her controversial political activities…

We just need to hope and pray that our priests and bishops tell the “right” story.

If she is made a saint it is the will of God. The decrees of Sainthood are infallible I believe.

I don’t know a whole lot about her, and will need to read up. I do wonder just a little whether her following has gone on disparate paths. A few years ago I was in a parish I had never been in before. At the back were copies of “The Catholic Worker”, a newspaper of sorts. So I picked one up and read it. To me, it didn’t seem to talk about anything Catholic at all. It was a combination of political polemics so far out as to make one listen for the black helicopter rotors. It was leftist in its very overt hatred of George Bush, but it also reminded one of some of the far-right groups that attribute everything bad in the world to a Masonic or Bilderberg plot. Very odd was what really seemed to me to be an affirmation of gender-bending among some group of young drug addicts somewhere. It did stop short of being obscene, but not by a whole lot. Really bizarre.

But then, if you read some of the Google stuff on Dorothy Day herself, she doesn’t seem that way, rebel though she was in many ways.

I can’t help but wonder whether her movement has splintered, with some of them being very purposeful and more faithful, perhaps to her thinking, but with some of them being just plain weird.

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