Carl Jung on Sacraments in the Catholic church


#1

In Psychology and Religion by Carl Jung he questions Sacraments in the Catholic church stating that either the Sacraments are like magic procedure which force God into action, or they that God responds because he has ordained the process.

Is it a magic spell used to compel God to do our will, and if so, what happens if he refuses? Does it mean the Sacrament/liturgy/ritual/faith confession is broken, and therefore useless to all?

If it is something we are doing to be obedient to God by going through a liturgy or process, does this mean God cannot act unless our little actions are completed. In other words, is God's will prevented from happening if I don't use the right words or actions? This would render him much less than a Sovereign Lord of all.


#2

Sacraments don't control God. He is not bound by them and He doesn't need them. They are gifts for us, channels of grace. They help us get closer to Him.


#3

[quote="Contra_Mundum, post:2, topic:296052"]
Sacraments don't control God. He is not bound by them and He doesn't need them. They are gifts for us, channels of grace. They help us get closer to Him.

[/quote]

Yes. They are gifts if you want them.

Some want them more than others.

Sometimes I long for the Eucharist.


#4

A sacrament is a sign, instituted by Christ, to give us grace. That means Jesus, God in flesh, gave us the sacraments. Doesn't sound at all like we are forcing God to bend to our will. Instead, we are being obedient to His will when we seek a life with Him through the sacraments He gave us! :)


#5

[quote="East_Anglican, post:1, topic:296052"]
In Psychology and Religion by Carl Jung he questions Sacraments in the Catholic church stating that either the Sacraments are like magic procedure which force God into action, or they that God responds because he has ordained the process.

Is it a magic spell used to compel God to do our will, and if so, what happens if he refuses? Does it mean the Sacrament/liturgy/ritual/faith confession is broken, and therefore useless to all?

If it is something we are doing to be obedient to God by going through a liturgy or process, does this mean God cannot act unless our little actions are completed. In other words, is God's will prevented from happening if I don't use the right words or actions? This would render him much less than a Sovereign Lord of all.

[/quote]

I would suggest you stop getting your theology from Carl Jung.


#6

[quote="1ke, post:5, topic:296052"]
I would suggest you stop getting your theology from Carl Jung.

[/quote]

I think it's a valid question for a non-Catholic, who doesn't have full understanding of the Sacraments, to ask. Jung certainly had a great deal to contribute about spirituality as a fundamental human appetite, and I don't think his work should be ignored in any serious study of the matter and even if he did have a misunderstanding of the Sacraments, he certainly was open to mystical experiences of God.

I like the answers above about the Sacraments being a gift, I think those were appropriate answers to the question.

Perhaps we can be a little more charitable and welcoming to non-Catholics coming here who ask questions in good faith, about our faith.


#7

[quote="mommamaree, post:4, topic:296052"]
A sacrament is a sign, instituted by Christ, to give us grace. That means Jesus, God in flesh, gave us the sacraments. Doesn't sound at all like we are forcing God to bend to our will. Instead, we are being obedient to His will when we seek a life with Him through the sacraments He gave us! :)

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#8

Sacraments are not magic spells. And God is quite able to act outside of the sacraments should he chose to do so.

But one of the things we Catholics believe is that God created us in his image and likeness. And in doing so he chose to allow us to share in some of his nature, including power and authority to act in this world. God gave us the sacraments and he expects us to make use of them. He honors Himself, us, and the gifts by letting us make use of them. And (miracles not withstanding) he honors our wishes not to make use of the sacraments.


#9

[quote="mommamaree, post:4, topic:296052"]
A sacrament is a sign, instituted by Christ, to give us grace. That means Jesus, God in flesh, gave us the sacraments. Doesn't sound at all like we are forcing God to bend to our will. Instead, we are being obedient to His will when we seek a life with Him through the sacraments He gave us! :)

[/quote]

There is an outward sign and an inward grace.:D


#10

Scott Hahn explains that the sacraments are like God’s “oaths” to us. They are the way He binds us to Himself through the Christian covenant. They are not something exterior to God that He is “bound” to or “has to obey”; rather, they are His own promises, and God keeps His promises.


closed #11

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