Catechism Help - Finding a Certain Passage?


#1

A short while back I remember reading a post where someone referred to part of the Catechism relating to people speaking against doctrine or the Church. I looked through Paragraph 4. Christ’s Faithful - Hierarchy, Laity, Consecrated Life which is where I thought something like that should be, but didn’t find anything.

Does anyone know where a statement about this may be located in the Catechism? (Note: I may have misinterpreted what I read in the post, so if I am way off-base here, let me know!)


#2

If you think you might know any exact words or phrases you’re looking for, there is a searchable version of the CCC here:

scborromeo.org/ccc.htm


#3

[quote=AuntMartha]A short while back I remember reading a post where someone referred to part of the Catechism relating to people speaking against doctrine or the Church. I looked through Paragraph 4. Christ’s Faithful - Hierarchy, Laity, Consecrated Life which is where I thought something like that should be, but didn’t find anything.

Does anyone know where a statement about this may be located in the Catechism? (Note: I may have misinterpreted what I read in the post, so if I am way off-base here, let me know!)
[/quote]

Not sure if this what you are looking for:

2089
817
88

I hope it helps.


#4

If you go to this site you can do a word search of the entire CCC.

scborromeo.org/ccc/ccc_toc.htm


#5

You may actually be thinkinf of the code of canon law, specifically canon 1369

vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P52.HTM


#6

the USCCB (usccb.org) also has a searchable Catechism.


#7

Thank you all! What good resources. I think you may have found the one/ones I am looking for.

If I may post a situation with a follow-up question then:

A woman “distinguished preacher” was allowed to speak at a Mass at this one church in my community recently. Her talk during the Mass seemed fine (Except that the priest really didn’t give a homily. He did get up and speak for about 2 minutes, telling the congregation a little about the speaker.). I detected no statements that seemed to be against the teachings of the RCC. However, after Mass she was given the opportunity for a question-answer session with any congregants who wanted to ask her something. This was held in the church (she stood at the lectern where Scripture is read, not the social hall or a classroom outside of the church). One of the priests was sitting right there with the rest of us.

There were some congregants present for this who were obviously in favor of major doctrinal changes, which was apparent in the questions and comments they made. But the speaker was also talking about all sorts of things that “needed to be changed”. She talked about how the Church’s stance on birth control is an outdated idea from the 1930’s, and how Pope Benedict was responsibile for the "firing’ of that Jesuit priest from America magazine. The worst one was when she talked about how the Church’s stance on homosexuality is wrong, and is just based on “a few verses from the Old Testament”. (Helloooo - what about Romans 1:26-27 and [size=2]1 Cor. 6:9-10?). The thing that really bothered me about all of this was that she was standing insuide the Catholic Church, with a priest right there, saying those things. If she were saying them outside of the church that would be one thing, but to be IN the church saying it is another. She never made any attempt to say, “The Church’s stance on this is _______”. And of course, the priest said nothing either. [/size]

[size=2]So I was trying to figure out what part of the Catechism speaks to this sort of action. From what you all posted, I thing the answer is in 88:[/size]
[size=2]

**88 **

The Church’s Magisterium exercises the authority it holds from Christ to the fullest extent when it defines dogmas, that is, when it proposes, in a form obliging the Christian people to an irrevocable adherence of faith, truths contained in divine Revelation or also when it proposes, in a definitive way, truths having a necessary connection with these.[size=2][/size] [/size]
[size=2][/size]
[size=2]Would her actions be considered against 88? Also, would what she was saying be considered either incredulity or heresy:[/size]
[size=2]

**2089 **

*Incredulity *is the neglect of revealed truth or the willful refusal to assent to it. “*Heresy *is the obstinate post-baptismal denial of some truth which must be believed with divine and catholic faith, or it is likewise an obstinate doubt concerning the same; *apostasy *is the total repudiation of the Christian faith; *schism *is the refusal of submission to the Roman Pontiff or of communion with the members of the Church subject to him.”[size=2][/size] [/size]
[size=2][/size]
[size=2]Or am I just going off the deep end here, over-blowing the situation?[/size]
[size=2][/size]
[size=2]Thanks again for your help.

[/size]


#8

You are way out of my league Aunt Martha. I’ll leave that for for the experts here.


#9

The following paragraphs are taken from the current GIRM. The conduct you describe is NOT ALLOWED by the Church and is an abuse of the Liturgy

The Homily

  1. The homily is part of the Liturgy and is strongly recommended,63 for it is necessary for the nurturing of the Christian life. It should be an exposition of some aspect of the readings from Sacred Scripture or of another text from the Ordinary or from the Proper of the Mass of the day and should take into account both the mystery being celebrated and the particular needs of the listeners.64

  2. The Homily should ordinarily be given by the priest celebrant himself. He may entrust it to a concelebrating priest or occasionally, according to circumstances, to the deacon, but never to a lay person.65 In particular cases and for a just cause, the homily may even be given by a Bishop or a priest who is present at the celebration but cannot concelebrate.

There is to be a homily on Sundays and holy days of obligation at all Masses that are celebrated with the participation of a congregation; it may not be omitted without a serious reason. It is recommended on other days, especially on the weekdays of Advent, Lent, and the Easter Season, as well as on other festive days and occasions when the people come to church in greater numbers.66

The following pragraphs are taken from Chapter III of Redemptionis Sacramentum, the Instruction from the Congregation of Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sarcraments (Cardinal Arinze) as a follow-up to John Paul II’s Encyclical, Ecclesia de Eucharistia

[64.] The homily, which is given in the course of the celebration of Holy Mass and is a part of the Liturgy itself,142 “should ordinarily be given by the Priest celebrant himself. He may entrust it to a concelebrating Priest or occasionally, according to circumstances, to a Deacon, but never to a layperson.143 In particular cases and for a just cause, the homily may even be given by a Bishop or a Priest who is present at the celebration but cannot concelebrate”.144

[65.] It should be borne in mind that any previous norm that may have admitted non-ordained faithful to give the homily during the Eucharistic celebration is to be considered abrogated by the norm of canon 767 §1.145 This practice is reprobated, so that it cannot be permitted to attain the force of custom

So, according to the Magesterium, this “distinguished preacher,” is not alllowed to preach at Mass at any time, especially during the time set aside for the homily.


#10

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