Catholic/Baptist Wedding


#1

My son is marrying in the Baptist Church. My husband doesn’t want to go to the ceremony and doesn’t want to help pay for any of the wedding cost because they are not marrying in the Catholic Church. I sent our son and his fiancee to see the priest and everything was fine until the part came up about signing a paper saying that they will raise the babies in the Catholic Church when they start coming. My son said that he didn’t know if he would raise them catholic. The priest up until that time was going to the ceremony to give a blessing and now everything is on hold. We have told our son where we stand about this situation and he understands. But I feel that if we do not go we will loose him and alienate our future daughter in law and any children from this union. She doesn’t understand the church’s view on this and can’t believe that the Catholic Church would not want us to go to the wedding. Any advice would be appreciated.


#2

[quote=stvr]My son is marrying in the Baptist Church. My husband doesn’t want to go to the ceremony and doesn’t want to help pay for any of the wedding cost because they are not marrying in the Catholic Church. I sent our son and his fiancee to see the priest and everything was fine until the part came up about signing a paper saying that they will raise the babies in the Catholic Church when they start coming. My son said that he didn’t know if he would raise them catholic. The priest up until that time was going to the ceremony to give a blessing and now everything is on hold. We have told our son where we stand about this situation and he understands. But I feel that if we do not go we will loose him and alienate our future daughter in law and any children from this union. She doesn’t understand the church’s view on this and can’t believe that the Catholic Church would not want us to go to the wedding. Any advice would be appreciated.
[/quote]

Maybe you could go to the wedding but not participate in the ceremony in any way. Maybe you could also skip the reception.
I don’t know if this good or bad advice. I’d definately talk to the priest. It’s not like they’re marrying in ignorance of the Church’s position on mixed marriages.


#3

This is your son. Go the wedding or you’ll forever regret it. You will be a much better wittness to the faith if your still on good terms. Your son maybe at early part in his faith walk where he’s questioning the churches teachings. It happens to many of us.

Not showing up will not convey the message your husband is trying to send. What they will then believe about the faith is that Catholics are a bunch of closed minded, intolerant people and may want nothing to do it after that. Not because we are that way but because they’re not at a place where church teaching makes sense to them.

Not showing up at your child’s wedding is huge, at least it’s a Christian marriage which is a good start. If you alienate them you may loose to the chance to witness the faith to your grandchildren.Your son knows how you feel, not showing up will not convert his wife and will not strengthen his faith. By the grace of God he very well could return to the faith and his maybe convert his wife. But they will always remember their very special day you refused to be a part of.

When I was 18 I decided I wanted to get married. My parents absolutely did not support me in this. They were angry. But they came to our wedding, and my dad even walked me down the aisle (at a wedding chapel no less.) Five years into my marriage I returned to my faith and 2 years later my husband converted. I know it was a difficult day for them but I give them so much credit for coming to my wedding anyway. They showed they loved and supported me even if they didn’t approve.

(We have since had our marriage convalidated :slight_smile: )


#4

[quote=rayne89]This is your son. Go the wedding or you’ll forever regret it. You will be a much better wittness to the faith if your still on good terms. Your son maybe at early part in his faith walk where he’s questioning the churches teachings. It happens to many of us.

Not showing up will not convey the message your husband is trying to send. What they will then believe about the faith is that Catholics are a bunch of closed minded, intolerant people and may want nothing to do it after that. Not because we are that way but because they’re not at a place where church teaching makes sense to them.

Not showing up at your child’s wedding is huge, at least it’s a Christian marriage which is a good start. If you alienate them you may loose to the chance to witness the faith to your grandchildren.Your son knows how you feel, not showing up will not convert his wife and will not strengthen his faith. By the grace of God he very well could return to the faith and his maybe convert his wife. But they will always remember their very special day you refused to be a part of.

When I was 18 I decided I wanted to get married. My parents absolutely did not support me in this. They were angry. But they came to our wedding, and my dad even walked me down the aisle (at a wedding chapel no less.) Five years into my marriage I returned to my faith and 2 years later my husband converted. I know it was a difficult day for them but I give them so much credit for coming to my wedding anyway. They showed they loved and supported me even if they didn’t approve.

(We have since had our marriage convalidated :slight_smile: )
[/quote]

Good advice rayne!
:blessyou:


#5

Go to your child’s wedding!


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.