"Catholic Bible"


#1

It’s been pointed out a few times, but just to reiterate, there isn’t a single “Catholic Bible” in English. Historically we used the Douay-Rheims. In 1965, the Revised Standard Version was published in a Catholic Edition. The following year, the Jerusalem Bible was published (it had actually been first published in French, and was so popular, it was translated into English). In 1970 the New American Bible was published and it is the basic translation read at Mass.

There have also been three other translations that have been published in Catholic Editions, that have been approved for children: Contemporary English Version, Today’s English Version (otherwise known as the Good News Bible), and the Living Translation.

So when you say “Catholic Bible”, please specify which one.


#2

Yes, when people are quoting the Bible, it is helpful to know which version they are using.

However, you should know that all Bibles are Catholic Bibles!. The New Testament was written by Catholics, for Catholics, and about Catholics. The Hebrew scriptures were organized and annotated with chapters and verses by Catholics. Catholics decided which of these books did belong in the Bible, then they were merged into one Bible by Catholics. The Bible was then preserved and protected from savages by Catholics for 1500 years until the invention of the printing press enabled widespread distribution.


#3

[quote=urquhart]Yes, when people are quoting the Bible, it is helpful to know which version they are using.

However, you should know that all Bibles are Catholic Bibles!. The New Testament was written by Catholics, for Catholics, and about Catholics. The Hebrew scriptures were organized and annotated with chapters and verses by Catholics. Catholics decided which of these books did belong in the Bible, then they were merged into one Bible by Catholics. The Bible was then preserved and protected from savages by Catholics for 1500 years until the invention of the printing press enabled widespread distribution.
[/quote]

Very true!


#4

But some “bibles” were so badly translated, misquoted and had books left out that one really can’t call them “bibles”.


#5

Not really. Other Bibles are missing 7 books in the Old Testament. This happened during the Reformation when good 'ol Luther decided the take these books out of the canon of the Bible. So, not until the 16 Century did the bible have 66 books. The Catholic Bible has 73 books. 46 in the Old testament and 27 in the New testament. Hope this helps

God Bless.


#6

I don’t mean to hijack the post, but after reading this I did a bit of digging and found This on EWTN about the missing books, and am wondering, does the Douay Rhimes include these books? and if not, where might one get a complete Bible?

God Bless.


#7

[quote=Jo’s_Dad]I don’t mean to hijack the post, but after reading this I did a bit of digging and found This on EWTN about the missing books, and am wondering, does the Douay Rhimes include these books? and if not, where might one get a complete Bible?

God Bless.
[/quote]

Yes, the Douay Rheims has those books. Any authentic Bible has those books. They were not removed until the reformation. The “scriptures” used by the apostles and the ECF included those books.


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