Catholic Church Attracting Russians


#1

MOSCOW, APRIL 18, 2005 (Zenit.org).- Fully 30% of Russians are favorably inclined to the Catholic Church, almost double the figure of five years ago, says a new poll.

The number of those who have negative opinions about the Catholic Church decreased during the same period from 9% to 5%.

A poll directed by the foundation “Obshczestvennoe mnenie” (Public Opinion) and reported by the Interfax agency, indicates that more than three-quarters of Russians (77%) watched the news coverage from the Vatican concerning the John Paul II’s funeral and burial rites.

This poll was conducted April 9-10 in 100 cities and towns throughout 44 of the major administrative divisions of Russia, with the participation of 1,500 respondents.

“The death of John Paul II, who was mourned by millions of people in all corners of the globe, did not leave Russians unmoved either,” said Interfax.

The majority of those polled (51%) were of the opinion that television reported on the events connected with the death and burial of the Pope “just as much as necessary.” Only 14% of respondents considered the reporting excessive.

Nearly half of those surveyed (46%) consider the death of John Paul II to be a loss for the entire world, whereas only a third (35%) consider the loss significant for Catholics only.

Listing the merits of John Paul II, at the request of the investigators, respondents most frequently mentioned his peacemaking activities and his numerous statements against violence and terrorism. Many of those polled spoke with approval of his efforts to reconcile peoples and confessions.

Half of those surveyed said they think the authority of the Catholic Church increased during the 26-year pontificate of John Paul II. Only 12% think that John Paul II’s activity had no impact on the level of authority of the Catholic Church. No one surveyed thought that the authority of the Church had decreased.


#2

[quote=hlgomez][Listing the merits of John Paul II, at the request of the investigators, respondents most frequently mentioned his peacemaking activities and his numerous statements against violence and terrorism. Many of those polled spoke with approval of his efforts to reconcile peoples and confessions.
[/QUOTE]

Interesting that the Russians did not mention the collapse of Communism as one of the Pope’s merits. Is that mentioned anywhere?
[/quote]


#3

I heard that covereage of the Pope’s funeral was limited in Russia because of media censorship. I heard that people had to gather in Catholic Churches in order to see it.


#4

Interesting that the Russians did not mention the collapse of Communism as one of the Pope’s merits. Is that mentioned anywhere?

I don’t know, but they are not naive, right? It is very much known throughout the world and not only to Russians. The news is just talking about the interest of so many Russians on the Catholic Church. It does not focus mainly on the late Pope John Paul II.

In your honest and unbiased opinion Fr, did Pope John Paul contributed much to the fall of communism in Russia?

Pio


#5

[quote=hlgomez]In your honest and unbiased opinion Fr, did Pope John Paul contributed much to the fall of communism in Russia?
[/quote]

Poland, yes, enormously. Russia, less so,

As a Catholic theologian has noted: “But it’s also heavily exaggerated by papal propagandists. After all, the Soviet regime did not fail because of the pope (before the arrival of Gorbachev, the pope was achieving about as little as he is now achieving in China), but instead imploded because of the Soviet system’s inherent economic and social contradictions.”

We must also look at the spiritual reality - there were the prayers of millions of Orthodox Christians every day and night in all their churches and in their home prayers .

There was also the blood and the prayers of the 20 million Orthodox martyred by the communists and gathered before the throne of the Lamb. This is, from the real viewpoint of God’s verities, the true reason why communism came crashing down so quickly - the blood of the holy martyrs.

All you holy Martyrs of Russia
pray for us
http://www.brooklynchurch.org/images/icon_newmartyrs.gif


#6

[quote=Fr Ambrose]Poland, yes, enormously. Russia, less so
[/quote]

I’m with Fr. Ambrose on this one. Any impact on Russia would have been indirect and through the Polish experience, which isn’t to say Russians didn’t respect the Pope or that the ultimate effect, even if only indirect, was insignificant.

Irenicist


#7

Fr. Ambrose and Irenicist,

I think it’s time for both of you to re-read the pages and facts on the history of the fall of communism in Russia. Yes it’s true that there were prayers of all people throughout Russia–but it was not only in Russia Father–it was throughout the world-- because of the impending danger of Nuclear War that was threatening all of humanity.

I would say don’t rely on the words of certain revisionists. Get the facts straight from the words and actions of the the key players–namely, Mikhael Gorbachev and Pope John Paul II and also Ronald Reagan. It is only interesting how misinformed both of you about this.

Pio


#8

[quote=hlgomez]Fr. Ambrose and Irenicist,

I think it’s time for both of you to re-read the pages and facts on the history of the fall of communism in Russia. Yes it’s true that there were prayers of all people throughout Russia–but it was not only in Russia Father–it was throughout the world-- because of the impending danger of Nuclear War that was threatening all of humanity.

I would say don’t rely on the words of certain revisionists. Get the facts straight from the words and actions of the the key players–namely, Mikhael Gorbachev and Pope John Paul II and also Ronald Reagan. It is only interesting how misinformed both of you about this.

Pio
[/quote]

To note that the Holy Father’s words and actions had only an “indirect” impact on Russia and Russians is not to say that this indirect impact was not critical, important or decisive. By putting the lie to the “normative consensus” behind authoritarian socialism in Poland, he created the context in which Poles could free themselves and so indirectly provided a light for Russians and others. But this was only possible because of his intimate and charismatic connection with the Polish people. He had no such connection with Russians. Hence Fr. Ambrose is essentially correct.

Irenicist


#9

And who is this un-named “Catholic theologian”? Perhaps one of the many that have contempt for JPII because he stood in direct contradiction to their open dissent from Church teaching? :rolleyes:


#10

[quote=Irenicist]To note that the Holy Father’s words and actions had only an “indirect” impact on Russia and Russians is not to say that this indirect impact was not critical, important or decisive. By putting the lie to the “normative consensus” behind authoritarian socialism in Poland, he created the context in which Poles could free themselves and so indirectly provided a light for Russians and others. But this was only possible because of his intimate and charismatic connection with the Polish people. He had no such connection with Russians. Hence Fr. Ambrose is essentially correct.

Irenicist
[/quote]

Regarding the collapse of comminism, that includes Russia too!!!

Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev said, “It would have been impossible without the pope.” :thumbsup:

images.washtimes.com/national/20050404-124034-2194r.htm


#11

[quote=hlgomez]Fr. Ambrose and Irenicist,

I think it’s time for both of you to re-read the pages and facts on the history of the fall of communism in Russia. Yes it’s true that there were prayers of all people throughout Russia–but it was not only in Russia Father–it was throughout the world-- because of the impending danger of Nuclear War that was threatening all of humanity.

I would say don’t rely on the words of certain revisionists. Get the facts straight from the words and actions of the the key players–namely, Mikhael Gorbachev and Pope John Paul II and also Ronald Reagan. It is only interesting how misinformed both of you about this.

Pio
[/quote]

In my opinion Ronald Reagan should be given the most credit for the fall of communism in Russia. To put it plainly, he bankrupted the soviet system into spending themselves into total collapse. Ron just outspent them into oblivion. The soviet system just could not compete with the capitalist system of the west. Anyway the seeds of the soviet unions destruction was pretty much sown in the late 70’s and 80’s when the satellite countries started to gain more independence. The communist system was a lie from the very beginning and it just wore itself out. The people just would not put up with it anymore. China will eventually come to the same conclusion but it will take much time for this to happen, but happen it will - even there.

StMarkEofE


#12

[quote=steve b]Regarding the collapse of comminism, that includes Russia too!!!

Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev said, “It would have been impossible without the pope.” :thumbsup:

images.washtimes.com/national/20050404-124034-2194r.htm
[/quote]

Mike Gorbachev who really wanted a more friendly and fuzzy face for his communist system NOT democracy which sort of happened as the result of the lessening of the iron belt of repression from the system that spawned Gorby.

StMarkEofE


#13

[quote=StMarkEofE]Mike Gorbachev who really wanted a more friendly and fuzzy face for his communist system NOT democracy which sort of happened as the result of the lessening of the iron belt of repression from the system that spawned Gorby.

StMarkEofE
[/quote]

Gorby’s words don’t need a filter. He credits the pope for the fall of the communist system. I think he should know.


#14

Is Gorby, Catholic? :slight_smile:

PAX

[quote=steve b]Gorby’s words don’t need a filter. He credits the pope for the fall of the communist system. I think he should know.
[/quote]


#15

[quote=steve b]Gorby’s words don’t need a filter. He credits the pope for the fall of the communist system. I think he should know.
[/quote]

This still dosnt change the fact that Gorby wasnt trying to elliminate the communist system in Russia but merely put a more friendly face on it. He knew that the system was failing but didnt want to abandon it altogether. The democratic undercurrent however could not be denied the people in Russia as well as the Eastern Europe. The system of communism could not sustain itself on lies and deceit. As far as him giving the pope credit for its failure so be it. But it was a combination of events and influences that created the changes that came about.

StMarkEofE

StMarkEofE


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