catholic church


#1

i am currently church of england but i am unhappy with it, a lot of my family are catholic and i am thinking of joining you…
what can i expext to be different


#2

Well … you will be joining the actual Church Christ himself established in the first century, to which Christ said, “He who hears you, hears me.” Moreover, Catholic priests are actually ordained in apostolic succession, and as such, their ordination is true. Thus, the Holy Eucharist is a true Sacrament which conveys grace ex opere operato.


#3

What about the Church of England are you unhappy with?


#4

The big things that anglicans and some of the other denomination differ with us are one, the recognition that the Pope is the leader of Christ’s Church, two, that scriptures alone are the one and only authority on all matters of faith and morals, and three that the Catholic version of the Bible has several more books than the KJV.
Along with these basic differences are the belief that Jesus really and truly is in the Holy Eucharist. That the bread and wine offered in the mass becomes the actual body and blood of Our Lord.

Other revelations that have come through Church Councils are, the concepts of Mary’s Assumption into Heaven (that Mary was physically assumed into Heaven as Jesus was -and as the prophet Elijah was) and the Immaculate Conception (that when Mary herself was conceived, she was born without original sin).

It would be good to look into how these doctrines came about especially the role as to how St. Bernadette and Lourdes convinced the Pope that the doctrine was correct as presented. This also gets into the Papal infallibility issues, as the story of how the Pope decided this issue proves that Heaven makes sure that the Pope gets it right when there is a big controversy.

Another big difference is the belief that Mary and the saints can and do intercede for us with God and Jesus. And that prayers for the dead can and do assist them IF they are in Purgatory (this coomes form the Books of Macabees, both of which were removed in the 16th century by the protestants.)

And finally (but not least) is the idea that faith alone is sufficient for salvation. This concept is directly contradicted by St. James epistle which was also removed in the 16th century. We believe that faith AND good works are required for salvation.

Belief in Jesus is required BUT you have to put that faith into actions with works of chairty and good will otherwise it is totally meaningless.

Other than that, we are a lot alike :slight_smile: Jesus is our Lord and Savior and we love God above all else, and we love our neighbors.

wc

One of our converts recently stated, being with the Catholic Church is like traveling in a luxury ocean liner, while being a protestant was like trying to get to Heaven in a row boat. :slight_smile:


#5

Other revelations that have come through Church Councils are…

Hmmm… let’s be clear: there are no “other revelations” in Catholic doctrine other than the one deposit of faith once and for all handed on by the apostles.

According to Dr. Ludwig Ott’s Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma,

With Christ and the Apostles General Revelation concluded. (sent. certa.)

Pope Pius X rejected the liberal Protestant and Modernistic doctrine of the evolution of religion through “New Revelations.” Thus he condemned the proposition that: "The Revelation, which is the object of Catholic Faith, was not terminated with the Apostles." D 2021.

The clear teaching of Holy Writ and Tradition is that after Christ, and the Apostles who proclaimed the message of Christ, no further Revelation will be made. Christ was the fulfilment of the Law of the Old Testament (Mt. 5, 17 ; 5, 21 et seq), and the absolute teacher of humanity (Mt. 23, 10: “One is your master, Christ” ; cf. Mt. 28, 20). The Apostles saw in Christ: “the coming of the fullness of time” (Gal. 4, 4) and regarded as their task the preservation, integral and unfalsified, of the heritage of Faith entrusted to them by Christ (1 Tim. 6, 14; 6,20; 2 Tim.1, 14; 2,2; 3,14). The Fathers indignantly repudiated the claim of the heretics to possess secret doctrines or new Revelations of the Holy Ghost. St. Irenaeus (Adv. haer III 1 ; IV 35, 8), and Tertullian (De praesc. 21) stress, against the Gnostics, that the full truth of Revelation is contained in the doctrine of the Apostles which is preserved unfalsified through the uninterrupted succession of the bishops.

*Catechism of the Catholic Church, *par. 67:

**67 **Throughout the ages, there have been so-called “private” revelations, some of which have been recognized by the authority of the Church. They do not belong, however, to the deposit of faith. It is not their role to improve or complete Christ’s definitive Revelation, but to help live more fully by it in a certain period of history. Guided by the Magisterium of the Church, the sensus fidelium knows how to discern and welcome in these revelations whatever constitutes an authentic call of Christ or his saints to the Church.

Christian faith cannot accept “revelations” that claim to surpass or correct the Revelation of which Christ is the fulfillment, as is the case in certain non-Christian religions and also in certain recent sects which base themselves on such “revelations”.


#6

My suggestion to you. Go to a local Catholic Parish and watch. I don’t know much about the Church of England/Anglican Church. So go for yourself and see what’s different. Then see if they offer an Iquiry session. My parish offers this every Monday. It’s for anybody who has questions about the Catholic Faith. They will answer any question you have. Then when/if you start RCIA and you decide it’s not for you it’s okay. No one will blame you if you don’t decide to go through with it.

Just my thoughts, hope it helps.


#7

[quote=AmberDale]My suggestion to you. Go to a local Catholic Parish and watch. I don’t know much about the Church of England/Anglican Church. So go for yourself and see what’s different. Then see if they offer an Iquiry session. My parish offers this every Monday. It’s for anybody who has questions about the Catholic Faith. They will answer any question you have. Then when/if you start RCIA and you decide it’s not for you it’s okay. No one will blame you if you don’t decide to go through with it.

Just my thoughts, hope it helps.
[/quote]

Amber,

I don’t think you’ll be able to “see” what’s different. I understand that their mass is quite similar. The real difference is valid Sacraments and Apostolic succession.

God Bless


#8

Like I said I don’t know much about the Church of England. My main point should have just been go to Inquiry. They can tell all about the Sacraments and Apostolic succesion. For me it’s easier to talk face to face. Forums help and I love them.


#9

I worshipped with Anglicans for a number of years before I returned home to the Church a couple of years age.

You can expect to notice, the effects of the Church’s Magisterium. My Anglican friends are enduring incredible turmoil because of its absence. Much of their grief comes from discussions that go, in outline, “Holy Scripture says this.” “Yes, but today, unlike when it was written, it means this other.” And no one decides what the teaching is, because no one can in the Anglican system. Protestant denominations (and Anglicans are one) like to suggest that the Catholic Church does not give authority to Holy Scripture. Not true. Holy Scripture is a part of the deposit of faith (not all of it – another difference) which the Church guards, explores, and explains, but never changes by either addition or subtraction.

Also, you will come to know the Church’s “sacramental sensibility.” To Catholics, matter matters. God made it, and uses it, here, now, today, to nourish His people in grace. The real presence in the Holy Eucharist – not some scheme of spiritual reception or partaking – is fully consistent with this sensibility.

You might find it of interest to read George Weigel’s “Letters to a Young Catholic,” and/or “the Truth of Catholicism.”

Blessings,

Gerry


#10

Also, I recommend that you read the testimony of other Anglicans who have converted to the Catholic Church.

These links may interest you …

The Conversion of Venerable John Henry Newman


[/font]Apologia Pro Vita Sua (John Henry Newman’s famous conversion story and “spiritual” autobiography)

[/font]**G.K. Chesterton’s Conversion Story **(edited by Dave Armstrong)

[/font]Why I Am A Catholic (G.K. Chesterton)

[/font]**Ronald Knox’s Conversion Story **(edited by Dave Armstrong)

Converting Congregations Catholic Answers Live interview with Fr Allan Hawkins, an Anglican convert who brought his whole parish into the Church with him (requires RealPlayer)

Path to Rome Catholic Answers Live interview with Fr Graham Leonard, an Anglican Bishop of London who converted and has written a book The Path to Rome (requires RealPlayer)

[/font]Ex-Anglican’s Conversion Story (Owen Francis Dudley)

[/font]Affirming All Things: A Conversion Story (Dwight Longenecker)


#11

There is a lot of similarities to the liturgy. Do you have a family member with whom you can attend Mass? Why not just start with that and then look into the classes.

Good luck and welcome home.


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