Catholic dating an Agnostic


#22

I would be very cautious. This much difference can cause a lot of problems in a marriage. Is he willing to commit to raising your children as Catholic? Is he going to support and encourage you to go to mass every Sunday? Will he be willing to be open to having as many children as God wants you to have? I hope you are not having sex with this guy. If he loves you he should be willing to at least take an RCIA course. Sorry this may not be what you want to hear.
My wife of 54 years is a non practicing Methodist. She committed to raising the children Catholic and we did not have premarital relations or practice artificial birth control. I have been told, if both parents are Catholic the children have a 50% chance of practicing their faith as adults. If the mother is the only Catholic, it drops to 25%. If the father is the only catholic it is 50%! :pray:


#23

IDK about that…I’ve been married for 15 years and the thought hasn’t even crossed my mind.


#24

I guess it depends how tough a negotiator the Catholic is. Once you are married, then the Catholic looses any bargaining chips they have.
If you know what I mean.


#25

I guess I still don’t, I’ll rephrase…we’ve been together almost 20 years and the though hasn’t crossed my mind.

For some Catholics, it may not be something they care to bargain on at all or an ultimatum “chip” they even want to play.


#26

He’s said that he would be ok with it if it’s their decision, even if they’re a toddler. He’s said that he’s against infant baptism because they don’t have a choice.


#27

How do you feel about that?


#28

He thinks a toddler can make a choice but a baby can’t? Toddlers are not capable of making informed decisions on their own.

Why is he against infant baptism? If he doesn’t believe it actually means anything, why would it bother him? To him it should just be for you.

This raises a bunch of red flags.


#29

If you’re talking about a church wedding, yea… he may need to get baptized first before it becomes valid. But you may still be able to hold a wedding in the church, or do a civil wedding. As for the kids, you ought to teach them about both faiths and perhaps let them choose when they’re older.


#30

No, he doesn’t need to be baptized for the wedding to be valid, given OP gets the proper permission.

Catholic + non-baptized individual = valid natural marriage (given proper permission acquired)

Catholic( + baptized non-Catholic Christian = sacramental (given proper permission acquired).


#31

Number 4 is a good one, and goes with: though we may have disagreements, you will never disparage my faith in front of our children.


#32

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