Catholic elements in film, "Snow White and the Huntsman?"

I saw the Snow White film a few days ago and was surpised by what seemed to be Catholic elements in the film. For instance, Snow white, while imprisoned by her evil stepmother in the castle, prays the "Our Father’ prayer (the Catholic version). Also, a theme throughout the film is the emphasis on purity and goodness overcoming evil.

Maybe it’s just my imagination that there are Catholic elements, and I’d be interested to see what other Catholics might think, who have seen the film. There is a lot of violence, and some sensuality, and I think it’s definately NOT for kids. I don’t usually like violent films, but this one was quite good.

Snow White is compared to Mary as the Queen of Heaven while she is dead. She is also wearing white garb.

Although, I haven’t seen the film…yet nor did I see the other movie “Mirror Mirror” which is based on “Snow White” I thought the following link might be interesting

campus.udayton.edu/mary/questions/yq2/yq336.html

God bless,

goforgoal

Disney’s masterpiece remains the best to me.

I haven’t seen the new ones, but I doubt they’d surpass it for accuracy to the tale’s heart.

I’d always agree with Walt’s interpretation that the heart of the story is Snow White’s motherly care for the Seven Dwarfs, and frankly the fairytale to me is most represented by the appropriate elongated title he gave to it.

There can be no greater Catholic theme in Snow White than that of the pure motherhood and love she shows those 7 quirky strangers. She instinctively and immediatly becomes the mother they have been truly waiting for. In return and rather inadvertantly(at first), they save her, physically and spiritually, from the evil looking to hunt her down. Perhaps they are her “eagles wings” and the shack she has been recieved in, is her special hidden place where no evil can enter uninvited.

Thanks for all the replies - I learned something from all of them. :slight_smile:

Disney is not all that accurate and generally Disney’s adaptions of this sort of material combine great technical flair with tons of saccharine. Compare their version of the ‘The Jungle Book’ which does have great music and looks good but replaces the themes of the book with pure sugar to the Soviet version which is far truer to the source material.

That was not so with Snow White, which is a most accurate adaptation that simply removes two elements, the first two temptations, and altering the ending so that the Queen falls to her assumed death from the cliff(which was done to remove the rather nasty punishment Snow White gives her in the story’s true ending, which is rarely adapted to Screen in subsiquent versions too).

The film’s characterisation of the Dwarfs was natural for a feature length adaptation(as their part in the story is quite short from the length point of view) and had no bearing on how accurate an adaption the film was.

In fact, come to think of it, the actual German title of the fairytale as rendered by the Brothers Grimm WAS “Snow White and The Seven Dwarfs”. So Disney was right on that point, it’s the real focus of the story, despite how briefly mentioned the Dwarfs are.

T

hat was not so with Snow White, which is a most accurate adaptation that simply removes two elements, the first two temptations, and altering the ending so that the Queen falls to her assumed death from the cliff(which was done to remove the rather nasty punishment Snow White gives her in the story’s true ending, which is rarely adapted to Screen in subsiquent versions too).

In other words it is not accurate at all as the originals of these stories tend to be (like much real folklore and myth) quite brutal at points. It’s a good thing Disney never got round to adapting any of my country’s folklore or myth as the resultant sugary mess would have been an absolute travesty. Mind you it managed that quite well enough with things like Tarzan.

These two elements are rarely seen in subsiquent adaptations either, so I don’t see how you could say that. And frankly the ending remains significantly nasty enough to really give the kids a good scare anyway.

Compair this film to the Wizard of Oz, which was terribly unfaithful to the Novel throughout the entire film(It’s a real classic film in spite of this!) removing whole segments of plot, changing the beginning, increasing the age of the main character(by way of simply casting an older actress) and changing the ending to the novel compleatly(It was all a dream!!! only it wasn’t in the original book, it was all real.).

Alice in Wonderland? The Wind in the Willows(adapted as one part of “The adventures of Icabod and Mr Toad”)? Winnie the Pooh? Peter Pan? 101 Dalmations?

You don’t consider these uniquely British properties? Ok they weren’t “folklore or myth” but they’re uniquely British stories.

I guess Mary Poppins is really from my country, but that’s an Australian Children’s work uniquely set in, and also popular in, the UK, so we can probably count that too.

I find it odd that none have seen the St, Joan of Arc reference in this movie version. o:

They are British properties, I am not British, although I quite like some of that as it happens. There’s quite a bit of darkness in the written original versions of some of those as well.

I missed the the reference to St. Joan of Arc in the film, but I did think of Snow White’s character as seeming like St. Joan of Arc when I watched the film, at least toward the end when she led them into battle.

A lot of people (not excluding homosexualists) identify with St. Joan of Arc but don’t see the reference to her in the film. Then again, the reference seems more of a coincidence.

It doesn’t matter whether the Grimm brothers were Catholics or Lutherans since they did not create the story, Snow White and the Seven dwarfs is a story created and shaped by generations of storytellers who might have had different religious beliefs. Of course the Grimm Brothers might have added or taken away something from the story or mixed different versions of it, but I don’t know anything about that so it would only be speculations if I said anything about it.

:D:p:thumbsup:

I would recommend you watching the movie Snow White: An Tale Of Terror (1997), a cable-tv movie with the great Sigourney Weaver as the Queen.

MUCH more accurate than the Disney version.

Yes, the Grimms were VERY grim. In the original Cinderella tale they collected from the oral tradition, birds peck out the eyes of the wicked stepsisters.

In their version of Rapunzel, the witch blinds both Rapunzel and the Prince and leaves them out to fend for themselves in the wilderness. :eek:

Among many other instances. There’s peasant morality for ya. LOL.

OTOH--------Snow White was never a warrior princess like she is in the movie.

Unfortunate, in my view. A clear attempt to “Lord Of The Rings”-ize her and the story.

Plus, there’s sort of a love triangle in the movie between her, the huntsman, and the prince. Attemmpt to capitalize on Twilight, anyone?:rolleyes:

Good thread. :thumbsup:

Although Disney’s version was closely based on the Perrault Version of the story, which had the happy ending.

I’ve watched that version of “Snow White” that you mentioned but I don’t remember it.

Yes, I do take it the Grimm’s Fairy Tales are very grim. I always enjoyed the story of “Hansel and Gretel” but at the same time it creeped me out – Cannibalism and Killer children? :eek:

“The Little Mermaid” actually commited suicide in the original version by Hans Christian Anderson.

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