Catholic Gardeners?


#1

Hi guys… there area few scattered gardening groups, but none of them have had any activity in quite some time. I would love to talk gardening… this was my first year doing it alone, and praise be I have derived a tremendous amount of satisfaction from it! I don’t know a thing about ornamentals… I just grow edible things.

What are your experiences, tips, triumphs, and failures? What varieties do you like? I personally grow heirloom varieties of pretty much everything.

I’ll share an example…
I had planted 2 varieties of heirloom corn, and was pretty excited to see that they were thriving, even in raised beds. Then a hailstorm came unexpectedly, and knocked every single 4 ft stalk down :frowning: In addition to losing all of the corn, the flattened stalks smashed, and subsequently killed all of my broccoli that was growing next door.

God did not bless me with a green thumb, but he has given me the motivation and work ethic to have a pretty productive first year :slight_smile: I have 8 types of tomato, 3 types of eggplant, 3 varieties of pepper, and 4 varieties of carrot (none of which are orange!). There are more to come, and were more goodies out there, but some things have already died down in the extreme heat. This has been so much fun, I’m just dying to talk about it. :smiley:


#2

I have always had a garden and grow mostly for the fun, not for the preservation of food.

In the past I’ve grown broccoli (too many worms though), peas, beans, carrots, tomatoes, peppers, strawberries, raspberries, zucchini, watermelon…:thumbsup:

This year, I believe I have a ground wasp nest in my garden, so the weeds have taken over. Every time I step foot into the garden to work in it, anywhere between 10-20 wasps suddenly appear. I am not willing to risk getting stung, so the area is off limits until frost, unfortunately. :frowning:

I also have a separate area with peppers and herbs, and they are doing really well with the heat.


#3

Forget about summer: It’s time to plant your fall/winter garden :smiley:

Stuff like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, corn salad, lettuces, spinach, broccoli raab, kale, collards…they all do well in the cooler weather. Brussel spouts actually does better with a little frost. Kale does really well in the winter. So now is the time to either set out transplants (like for the broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage) and/or sow your greens. If it’s really hot there like it is here, you may have to put a sun cover over them so they don’t scorch in the heat. You can also sow your beets, carrots and kholrabi too. It’s time for snap peas and beans too…

You can really harvest late if you cover them with row covers.

I like to plant carrots all around my different lettuces. They grow well together.

Tomatoes, eggplants and peppers love the hot weather though, so those will still do well for you. It’s not too late to plant cucumber and summer squash seeds. There’s still time for that. All of my zucchini plants disintegrated from the squash bugs though. I’m not sure if I want to bother trying again this season. But the butternut squash and the acorn squash are doing really well (knock on wood). Delicata squash is growing well, but it takes a while to get any fruit from them, so only time will tell if they survive the squash bugs like the butternut and acorn squash.

I tried a new strain called “cavilli” zucchini and they did better than last years, but they eventually succumbed to the squash bugs too. There is a strain that is self pollinating zucchini (the type: partenon), so you can keep a ground cover over the whole plant the whole time and it will produce fruit and the bugs won’t be able to get in and ravage it. I haven’t tried it yet though…I suppose I should and get back to all my fellow gardeners about it…


#4

[quote="Rence, post:3, topic:249915"]
Forget about summer: It's time to plant your fall/winter garden :D

Stuff like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, corn salad, lettuces, spinach, broccoli raab, kale, collards...they all do well in the cooler weather. Brussel spouts actually does better with a little frost. Kale does really well in the winter. So now is the time to either set out transplants (like for the broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage) and/or sow your greens. If it's really hot there like it is here, you may have to put a sun cover over them so they don't scorch in the heat. You can also sow your beets, carrots and kholrabi too. It's time for snap peas and beans too....
.

[/quote]

Oh yes :D It's super hot here, so I'm trying to figure out how to keep my fall crops from withering and dying before it cools off a bit.

My little planning sources say not to bother sowing until early August around here for the fall and cold weather crops :shrug:


#5

If you have old thin sheets that you can spare, you can use them to shade your fall crops. Otherwise, you can get some garden fabric at places like Lowes, or online at Gardeners.com gardeners.com/All-Purpose-Fabric-6%27-X-20%27/32-646,default,pd.html

I’ll probably sow some now and some in a few weeks. Your planning sources are probably right. It’s probably even hotter where you are than where I am.


#6

Very good idea! I’ve had to erect little covers out of paper towels for my peppers… sun scald has been a big problem this summer.


#7

Strawberries... golden rasberries in a barrel, red rasberries in a barrel.

Oregano, basil, thyme. Oh, and mint in areas that otherwise would just grow weeds... Nice ground cover!

Some tomatoe plants...

Cucumbers.

I have a lemon, orange, fig, olive, peach and pomegrante trees... All but the poms are quite young. just starting to get fruit.

I also grow passion flowers... they are supposed to fruit, but did not last year. so we'll see! I decided to grow them when I was looking for a vine... and heard about all the Catholic Symbology with regard to the Passion of Christ... How can you go wrong???


#8

Faithfully, I am jealous of your trees! We have nearly two acres, plenty of space to put a few fruit trees. Just no citrus, as we do have the occasional hard freeze here. With regard to the passion flower - perhaps your need a few to pollinate each other, or maybe they should be hand pollinated? I don't know anything about passion fruit, I admit, but I like the religious parallels!


#9

We buy them small. They are each in a barrel right now. I’m trying to get some starts off my Pom. They are pretty easy… so we’ll see. A pom can be a tree or a bush depending on how you shape it when it’s young… We rent. So I don’t want to populate this landscape. So, everything is a take with…


#10

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