Catholic "movements," orders, ministries

Can someone help me on the ways in which the following are different, and how they might be approved through the Church (local, Diocese, or further up)

A "movement" such as the Catholic Worker Movement
A religious order
A parish ministry
A ministry within a parish that might grow or join with another parish?

I'm wondering how each one must process through in order to be sanctioned. I am a great admirer of the Catholic Worker Movement and support the local house near my parish. I was wondering, was the Catholic Worker movement sanctioned differently from, say, an "order?" (Was it officially sanctioned by the Church?) I've read about Dorothy Day, but can't recall if the CW movement was or was not "officially" approved. Whether it was or not, it's a beautiful movement and I just began to think about the different types of "groups" in the Church.

Are "movements" by laypersons required to be sanctioned? Forgive me, I'm not that knowledgeable about these, and wondered if some of these "groups" go through a diocese and then go through other steps.
Peace
Kathryn Ann

[quote="Kathryn_Ann, post:1, topic:266501"]
Can someone help me on the ways in which the following are different, and how they might be approved through the Church (local, Diocese, or further up)

A "movement" such as the Catholic Worker Movement
A religious order
A parish ministry
A ministry within a parish that might grow or join with another parish?

I'm wondering how each one must process through in order to be sanctioned.

[/quote]

You need to read canons 298-329 of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, which deal with the creation of private and public associations: vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P11.HTM (and following pages)

And also canons 573-606 regarding the norms of consecrated life: vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1Y.HTM

These provisions give you a basic understanding of the way in which Catholic organisations achieve recognition, although its worth saying that some movements remain unofficial, as would some parish ministries - they are merely examples of people working together, who do not seek or obtain official recognition or status.

A small but significant point: although many people generically refer to religious communities as 'orders' this is inaccurate. There are very few religious orders, and no new ones since the foundation of the Jesuits. The correct generic term is religious institutes, most of which are congregations, societies and so on. Any new institute created in the contemporary world will definitely not be a 'religious order,' even though many people innocently continue to use this term.

Hope this helps.

Thank you to Ocarm,

Mike,
for taking the time to post this helpful information.
Peace in Christ,
Kathryn Ann

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