Catholic or Methodist


#1

I was raised Methodist and always referred to myself as so. However, since my attitude has changed and I now attend Mass fairly regularly by my own free will, how should I classify myself. I kneel, bless myself, pray ther prayers, and so on. Do I call myself Methodist because I was baptized and confirmed in the UMC or do I call myself a Catholic becuase that is where I need to be, for many reasons.

DU


#2

How about A CHRISTIAN :thumbsup:

God bless you on your journey.


#3

Hi Snowman,

I would say that, if you have not gone through the RCIA program and been received into the Catholic Church, then you are not yet Catholic, although in spirit you probably are. However, if you believe in Jesus Christ as your Savior from sin, have been baptized in the Name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and seek to follow our Lord Jesus Christ as His disciple, then you are a Christian.

Grace and peace,
Gene


#4

This is funny because I was in the same position. There’s a simple answer to this question…You’re a Cathodist. :wink:


#5

Welcome to the Cathodist club, snowman. Send me a PM and I’ll teach you the secret passwords . . . .

Seriously, I’m about where you are, though for the past seven years or so I’ve been trying to split the difference as an Episcopalian. But with the way ECUSA’s going right now, I wouldn’t recommend that.

Edwin


#6

It has always been my understanding that as long as you were baptized with water in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and it was intended to be a baptism, then you are a member of the Catholic Church, but until you’ve been confirmed in the Church, you are not in full communion with Her. I could be wrong…

Fiat


#7

Hey Rose,

Cathodist…


#8

Please speak with a Catholic priest about this, friend! If you want to be a Catholic, you will have to go through conversion in RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) in order to participate in Catholic Sacraments, like Holy Communion. A priest can give you more information about this. :blessyou:


#9

the most important reason to go ahead and take plunge is to be able to receive the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ… the Eucharist.

I can’t imagine not having the Eucharist. It is an amazing gift of love from Jesus! Nothing else in any other church can compare to the Eucharist.Imagine being able to taste and see the goodness of the Lord, to be physically touched by Jesus in this Earthly world!

God Bless you on your journey. You are a Christian on the way to full Communion.


#10

I refer to myself as a someday Catholic. I figure it is a good term until I am done with all this. Although I still have a Methodist church constantly hitting me up for money, I haven’t been there for quite some time though. I just have other classes that are going to come first, since most of the childbirth classes happen at the same time as the RCIA classes.

Kat


#11

[quote=NightRider]Please speak with a Catholic priest about this, friend! If you want to be a Catholic, you will have to go through conversion in RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) in order to participate in Catholic Sacraments, like Holy Communion. A priest can give you more information about this. :blessyou:
[/quote]

see your priest
a baptized Christian, living a moral life, has already received the gift of initial faith and conversion, and has no need for another conversion. It is incorrect to speak of a baptized Christian who is received into full commuion with the Catholic church as a convert (the old term). The RCIA rites acknowledge the special status of the baptized. What is necessary is preparation for confession, first holy Communion and confirmation. This preparation is based on scripture, especially the Sunday lectionary cycle, and doctrine classes, and specific instruction in the rites and sacraments themselves. For convenience and practical concerns, and because those involved share many of the same questions and concerns, adults who are unbaptized, Christians of other denominations, and adult Catholics who never received adequate instruction or the sacraments, are often placed in the same class. But the rites themselves are different for each of these three groups.


#12

[quote=Contarini]Welcome to the Cathodist club, snowman. Send me a PM and I’ll teach you the secret passwords . . . .

Seriously, I’m about where you are, though for the past seven years or so I’ve been trying to split the difference as an Episcopalian. But with the way ECUSA’s going right now, I wouldn’t recommend that.

Edwin
[/quote]

Not happy with the ECUSA either…HUH? :nope:


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