Catholic or Orthodox?

Can anyone give high points of the differences between Catholicism and Orthodox faith?

Can an Orthodox person receive communion at a Catholic church?

And, does the Orthodox faith not support the Immaculate Conception?

  1. Catholics are in communion with the Bishop of Rome. Eastern Orthodox are not. Read about the Great Schism of 1054 for historical details.

  2. The Catholic Church would offer the Eucharist to Eastern Orthodox persons, in certain circumstances. However, the Eastern Orthodox churches would tell their members not to receive Catholic sacraments, except perhaps in danger of death.

  3. Eastern Orthodox would not use that term, although they consider Mary sinless.

See:

ewtn.com/library/ANSWERS/IMCONCEP.HTM

orthodoxwiki.org/Immaculate_Conception

I gave high points before, our Orthodox brothers got insulted, so I am not going to do that again.:slight_smile:

The problem is, we and Orthodox have slightly different opinions as to what our differences are and whether they are crucial or trivial.

I believe Orthodox see the Immaculate Conception as deriving from what they say is a wrong conception of Original Sin (which they usually refer to as Ancestral Sin). I think the churches can find more agreement on the issue with original sin being described by the CC as a lack of original holiness and justice and saying Mary was infused with grace immediately at conception, instead of speaking of Original Sin in terms of guilt, but I won’t go further and claim that they would agree the differences are now non-trivial.

The Catholic Church sees the differences as small and not a barrier to communion, but many Orthodox see major issues still in the way and some would say the Catholic Church has committed to some heresies.

Does anyone know if they refer to their priest as “father”? Or anywhere good to look for info like this?

Yes, we refer to our priests as Father.

Found this statement about the Orthodox Church and apostolic succession:

“the Church asserts that Apostolic Succession also requires Apostolic Faith, and bishops without Apostolic Faith, who are in heresy, forfeit their claim to Apostolic Succession.[57]”

Does the Catholic Church take this same view??

I might research Catholic responses to whether Church of England bishops (1) have Apostolic Succession and (2) are validly ordained, and responses to other Protestant churches that claim Apostolic Succession. I read through some things myself, but nothing official, so I’ll refrain from offering my own thoughts.

The CC certainly holds that it itself has Apostolic Faith.

Why Church of England may I ask?

Well, an Anglican once told me she was part of a Catholic-lite church. :wink: Anglicans, at least high Anglicans, have probably been the most Catholic protestants out there (historically, anyway), and I know that the question of their apostolic succession has been officially addressed by the Catholic Church. I figured it would be fertile ground for determining the CC’s view on the matter.

Very similar in matters of faith. Even on our blessed Mother, they hold similar beliefs, they just are not dogmatized.

They do the sign of the cross in their liturgy, but it’s from right to left, unlike ours, left to right.

Their liturgy involves standing and chanting, etc. And of course the most blessed sacrament is the heart of their faith.

We have Catholic Churches in the east who are very identical to them under our umbrella, btw.

You will find they have more books in their bibles than we do…anywhere from like 76 to 81 total books.

They believe the Bishop of Rome is/was the “first among equals”…but not final authority.

They acknowledge the first 7 councils as authoritative.

I hope to see unification between east and west in my lifetime. And I think it’s a very real possibility.

The Orthodox is part of the Catholic Church, albeit in schism.

The Catholic Church allows the Orthodox to receive Communion in a Catholic Church but as far as I know the Orthodox bishops will not permit them to do this.

As far as I understand the Orthodox rejects the Immaculate Conception.

I respect the Orthodox because of their ancient history.

However, they blame the pope for the sack of Constantinople during the crusades. While that was a very deplorable event, it was not due to the pope. It was the soldiers who were subsequently excommunicated.

Additionally, the orthodox have many schisms.

All churches have a plethora of schisms in times past and present.

The RCC has never chosen to become a new or separated entity.

And yet Rome profited handsomely from the weailth and relics looted from Constantinople.

Additionally, the orthodox have many schisms.

Can you name them? Rome has had multiple competing Popes, sedevacantists and that whole protestant reformation thing. Plus there was that major schism started by Cardinal Humbert.

The soldiers sacked Constantinople as payment for their own services. They did not leave with enough spoils from their Muslim targets. I’m not sure your statement about Rome squares up.

For schisms we have Egypt (coptics), the Greek Orthodox, the Russisn orthodox, oriental, and Syrian. Then several further schisms within these resulting from debate over succession or other issues.

Lastly, comparing the situation with Protestantism or others who left the Roman Catholic Church does not square up. If someone wants a divorce, you cannot make the other party stay.

The RCC has never chosen to separate or become something different.

You might check to see what Ignatius of Antioch had to say about schism and creating divisions. You might also check what Irenaeus of Lyon wrote about the church in Rome.

What are you talking about, they never reached their Muslim targets? Constantinople was looted for three days and all that wealth was taken back to the West, some of it being delivered to Pope Innocent III.

For schisms we have Egypt (coptics)

Huh? According to the Catholic view of history, the Copts broke off from the Catholic Church after the Council of Chalcedon.

the Greek Orthodox, the Russisn orthodox

Greeks and Russians are in communion. There is no schism there.

oriental, and Syrian

There’s Chalcedon again, so you are actually referring to Catholic schisms.

Then several further schisms within these resulting from debate over succession or other issues.

I have no idea what you are referring to here, but since you have been consistently in error up till now, I think it is a safe bet you are wrong here too.

Lastly, comparing the situation with Protestantism or others who left the Roman Catholic Church does not square up. If someone wants a divorce, you cannot make the other party stay.

Well that describes how Rome left the Church. After Cardinal Humbert initiated the separation with the litany of false claims which was the Bull of Excommunication he laid on the altar of Hagia Sophia, the breach was cemented when one of the other papal legates, Frederick of Lorraine, was crowned as Pope Stephen IX, who along with Cardinal Humbert and Peter of Amalfi had been excommunicated by a council of bishops in Constantinople.

The RCC has never chosen to separate or become something different.

History shows otherwise.

You might check to see what Ignatius of Antioch had to say about schism and creating divisions.

Right back at you.

You might also check what Irenaeus of Lyon wrote about the church in Rome.

I am well aware of how Catholics misinterpret St Irenaeus.

Misinterpret? The church in Rome that has preeminent authority with with all other churches should agree. I guess you can interpret that …in some other manner.

Humbert issued an excommunication of one individual. Equating that to a separation of churches does not exactly work. Otherwise, there would not have been subsequent letters that formalized the separation.

The fact remains, in all of the events listed above, eastern churches chose to leave.

Lastly, to the present day, one can see the entities that continue to point fingers.

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