Catholic participation in Jewish holy days


#1

I am a Catholic Jew meaning that I am a Catholic convert from Judaism. I had an Orthodox Bris as a Jewish Child (mother is Jewish). So, despite the fact that I go to Mass and am orthodox to all of the Catholic holidays, traditions and theology, I still long for some of my Jewish holidays and partake in them.

For example, I partake in the Passover holiday (which augments nicely with the Easter Christian celebration). I also partake in Chanukah, which usually occurs around Christmas time.

I have been told by many Catholics that partaking in the Jewish holidays makes me apostate to Roman Catholicism. I question that notion and wonder if that is really true.

Further, I long to go to the high holiday services at the local Othrodox schul (I am a member of our local RC Chruch) but am leary to attend these services because it is questionable if that is within the purview of Christianity.

I ask if you think that is true - - - am I apostate in celebrating the Jewish holidays? Would I be apostate to Roman Catholicism to attend high holiday services at the local Synagogue?

Did Jesus not attend all of these same services in his time?

Daniel


#2

What is the purpose behind attending to the Jewish holydays?

It seems that while you may have converted to Catholicism your heart and belief may lie elsewhere.


#3

I doubt that it makes you apostate. It should comfort you to know that the early church struggled with the same issue, as evidenced by the debate between James and Paul over whether gentiles that converted to Christianity were bound to Jewish law and custom. He argued that they were not, and won. I am certainly not the authority to give you a definitive answer, but I would suspect that if you practiced Jewish traditions on top of (as opposed to in replacement of) Catholic traditions in your household, that it would not be a problem, as it was done in the very earliest days of the church. Coptic Catholics also still maintain practices that are heavily influenced by Judaism. However, to regularly go to an actual synagogue to participate might create a perception that you are not 100% committed to Catholicism. Now, as I say that, there’s certainly nothing wrong if a Catholic wants to go with non-Catholic family members and participate in their services, so the level and amount of participation might be a factor here too. I suppose in the end, I’d have to ask what exactly was the motivation? At the same time, I’d hate for ANYONE to question how “Catholic” you actually were, as happened to the Jewish “conversos” (those that converted to Catholicism) in Spain after the Reconquista.

This wouldn’t be a bad question to ask your local priest, or better yet, bishop.


#4

You are free to attend Jewish and Christian services. There’s no law in the Church that prohibits it.


#5

Have you checked out this website?

www.hebrewcatholic.org


#6

From what I understand, being Jewish is both a culture and a religion, so I don’t see anything wrong with you partaking in something of your heritage. God hears all our prayers whether they are Jewish, Christian or Muslim. The Catholic Church is the fulfillment of Judaism, so I don’t see anything in conflict.


#7

The principle of double is not being correctly stated and being mixed with the lesser evil principle. But let that pass, I still think that the principle of double effect may correctly applied to the situation. (I am an old retired philosophy teacher. Please some young teacher take this over for me.)


#8

**As a non-practicing Catholic, I offer this opinion:

Anything you do in your life that brings you closer to God, that fills you with reverence for Him and with gratitude for your life on this earth, will be pleasing to God. You are connected to both faiths. To deny one in favor of the other is to deny your very self and the legacy that you have inherited. You are fortunate to have two toolboxes from which to draw instruments to fine-tune your faith, understand your place in God’s world, and become a better human being.

Some will tell you that you must choose. Well, choose both. Honor both. Love both. Grow in spirit and love. Listen to the voice of God. Become what He would want you to be.

Limerick**


#9

Hi,
Another non-practising (or lapsed/rarely practising) Catholic here.

I also don’t see how celebrating the Pass Over or other Jewish festivals would be anti-Christian (or anti-Catholic), as Christianity includes the Old Testament.
I hope I don’t get banned for my views as I find this site quite interesting.


#10

Practicing cradle Catholic here, and a Conservative who is pro-life and likes the Latin Mass.

That said, my opinions seem to differ from others here.

I have never been a Jew. Yet once I was invited to celebrate Passover in a Jewish home. To make sure it was okay, I asked a priest I trusted … He gave me permission and explained that actually Catholics are spiritual descendants of the Jews.

~~ the phoenix


#11

You might be interested in this site too: Second Exodus
I hope you hang in there and don’t get discouraged.


#12

I would suggest checking out Roy Shoeman’s books: Salvation is from the Jews and Honey from the Rock. Also, his website is:

salvationisfromthejews.com/alljews.html

He is convert from Judiasm. I have heard him speak. Awesome!!!


#13

As far as this forum goes, there is a lot of anti-Semitism that I’ve observed, usually in the Traditionalist section of the forum. There is still a small core of Roman Catholics who traditionally distrust Jews. I wouldn’t dare start any threads that would attract these rather rabid subset for I’ve noticed they come to threads attracted like sharks on a feeding frenzy.

As a fairly moderate person myself, I find much of this website to be uninspiring, sad to say. You will probably not get a well-rounded view of Catholicism. Those with more moderate views are silenced by peer pressure, I’ve noticed.

If you want to nourish your Catholic faith, I suggest you do it in your parish where you’ll likely find more reasonable people.

Theologically speaking, attending Jewish religious events is totally acceptable but not a requirement of the faith. You are free to observe religious requirements of Judaism but not required to. The circumcised and uncircumcised are welcome as disciples of Jesus.


#14

I’ve observed much more than anti-Semitism here. Yes, go to your parish.


#15

Ok if we all have titles here…I guess I would be called a revert-meaning either I practice my catholic faith or I don’t at all I’ve never joined another church or faith. So here is my opinion. I don’t believe lying to the Nazis to save lives is a sin at all-I have heard this question presented in various ways-one was if you were hiding a Jewish family in your house and the Nazis came knocking at your door and asked you if you were housing any Jews would you admit it? Some said if you did not you were guilty of the sin of lying…I think if you did admit it-it is the same as Judas handing Jesus over to those who would cruicify Him. Because you made a commitment to protect those people you are hiding-to knowlingly hand them over to be tortured and murdered is a hienous act.

As far as Anne Frank is concerned don’t you think we are way out of bounds in regards to even begin to judge the soul of a child? Isn’t that arrogance on our part? Those are my thoughts.


#16

Not all Catholics are the same ,not all Jews are the same, not all people are the same.!!!
God loves ALL his children whatever denomination or not they are.

We all should try to live our lives for the good whatever we perceive that to be.I happen to beleive the Catholic church continues on from Judaism and is the One True Catholic and Apostolic Church.We directly follow the teachings of Jesus.St.Peter St.Paul and all the Apostles teachings.We have a direct line from where we are today right back to the Apostles establishment of the church.
I know God loves all his children.If we have been enlightened (being Catholic),more is expected of us,because we should know better as we have been taught.Those that have not had the opportunities to learn cannot commit sins in the same way as us who should know better.Anyway these are just my opinions hope they help.I will pray for you…
God Bless you


#17

:sad_yes:
And Lainey, from me to you: :clapping::hug3:

Furthermore, think of all that she suffered! And :crying:still a child!!

To OP: It is very possible that your previous threads were removed for something that was posted in them by someone else. I would** not** assume that they were taken down for just “being”. More likely, things that you may have never seen, caused therir removal…It happens to all of us. Hang in there!! (Well,:blush: hang in :grouphug:here, I mean…)


#18

It is perfectly acceptable for you to attend Jewish services as a Catholic. After all, Christ Himself was/is Jewish. :slight_smile: It’s important to acknowledge your heritage, as it is a part of you. As Jesus said, “I have come not to abolish but to fulfill.” Don’t throw in the towel!

God bless. :slight_smile:


#19

I have cleaned up many posts, including the OP’s, due to the fact that there were far too many topics involved for just one thread. I apologize for any confusion!

Klara


#20

I’m a Catholic and a Francisan. I was born and raised Jewish. I converted very young at age 21. My sibblings and other relatives are Jewish. I still celebrate the high holy days with my family. My family does not cease to be my family.

As long as I do nothing that is in conflict with the Catholic faith, there is no problem here.

On the other hand, my family was at my investiture, my temporary profession and my solemn profession. They have been to mass with the brothers on Christmas Eve, Easter and other days that would be considered “high holy days” in Catholicism. There is a mutual respect and of course, a lot of family love.

This fondness that draw us together as a family has produced some good fruit. Two of my brothers married Catholics. My nephews and nieces are Catholic and when I was home for a week of summer vacation my brothers asked me how they could check out the RCIA.

Love and patience can lay the groundwork for great graces.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :slight_smile:


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