Catholic Piety

I am studying my way into the Catholic Church and have a solid grasp of just about every dogma, doctrine, and theology taught by the Church. However, being that I don’t know any Catholics, I don’t have a clue about Catholics practice their spirituality.

Are there any good websites that go over such things as:

[list]
*]Catholic prayers
*]How to speak respectfully to priests, bishops, etc
*]Devotions
*]Parishoner’s role at mass
*]anything else
[/list]

Try kensmen.com/catholic/beingcatholic.html It is a guide to traditional Catholic customs.

www.spiritdaily.com It has links to prayers, novenas and other sites. I go to it every day

ourladyswarriors.org/ has Church documents and articles as well as Prayers.

I also recommend you read Story of a Soul by St Therese of Lisieux. She died at age 24 years and her spirituality was so amazing that Pope John Paul II named her a Doctor of the Church. You can read it online at gutenberg.net

Lectio Divina And the Practice of Teresian Prayer is available here cfpeople.org/Books/Lectio/cfptoc.htm

Have you discovered Fr John Corapi and fr Larry Richards yet? They have talks on CD & DVD as well as some online, which are really great, even for us cradle Catholics.

Another good source of information, besides the Catholic Answers Website, is
amm.org/chss/chss.htm

Are you near a Catholic Church? You might try making an appointment with the Parish Priest. Oftentimes speaking face to face with someone and asking your questions is a marvelous way to get your answers.

If you are near a Catholic Church, you might want to attend Mass. It is another wonderful way to observe how Catholics celebrate the Eucharist.

Arieh,

You got some good links from the other posters. Although I feel that it is important to note that although the Apologia site (the kensmen.com/catholic/beingcatholic.html link above) does contain some useful information, that site, in my opinion, is rife with animosity towards the Church, and,*in my opinion, *is not faithful. Please exercise extreme caution and prudence!

I am sure that Eileen was recommending it for some of its good ponts, and charitably overlooking what I find to be its serious infidelity.

VC

Sorry, I haven’t been to it lately so I had overlooked that point when I posted.

I was thinking of the traditional prayers etc. and forgot the other as I ignore that stuff when I come across it but forgot that those new to Catholicism & those seeking might be confused or led astray.

Mea culpa :frowning:

Ah, Eileen, I totally understand! I hate the fact that that site has some good things on it but also is seething with disrespect and disloyalty to the Church.

Maybe someone can start another site that has all that good stuff, but which is actually faithful?

VC

Catholic pages catholic-pages.com/ is good. Lots of info and excellent links.

[quote=Verbum Caro]Arieh,

You got some good links from the other posters. Although I feel that it is important to note that although the Apologia site (the kensmen.com/catholic/beingcatholic.html link above) does contain some useful information, that site, in my opinion, is rife with animosity towards the Church, and,*in my opinion, *is not faithful. Please exercise extreme caution and prudence!

[/quote]

Thanks for the warning, but I have already been to that site and noticed its extremism. Although I can certainly sympathize with Traditionalists (the implementation of V2 was an absolute disaster) I would have to say they have gone overboard.

Thanks for the warning, but I have already been to that site and noticed its extremism. Although I can certainly sympathize with Traditionalists (the implementation of V2 was an absolute disaster) I would have to say they have gone overboard.

Not to go off topic, here, but really the way you worded this is simply not true. The problem was never the implementation of Vat.II, but of those who, in the name of Vat. II or in the “spirit of Vat.II,” imposed their own agendas on the unsuspecting faithful. They had been waiting for decades to toss out many things to replace them with what they wanted, not with what was directed by Vat. II. Just to be sure you are clear about this issue–Vat. II was never implemented at all at many parishes, but totally overlooked or abused in order to put in what some had wanted to do for a long time.

Now, on to the topic of this thread, if you want to understand the Catholic world view, which is even more important that specific prayers, which will make little sense to you without that understanding, I suggest you read either Orthodoxy or The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton. If you don’t come away more Catholic than Protestant after reading either of those, I would be very much surprised. :wink:

[quote=arieh0310]I would have to say they have gone overboard.
[/quote]

Actually, they haven’t. They just keep threatening to. Or maybe they think they’re on a different ship.

[quote=Della]Not to go off topic, here, but really the way you worded this is simply not true. The problem was never the implementation of Vat.II, but of those who, in the name of Vat. II or in the “spirit of Vat.II,” imposed their own agendas on the unsuspecting faithful.

[/quote]

Della,

That is exactly what I mean by implementation. I do not reject Vatican II, what I reject is the gross distortion of Tradition “in the spirit of Vatican II”.

If you haven’t already explored the EWTN website, they have tons of good information. Here’s a link to their devotionals, which contain prayers and lots more.ewtn.com/Devotionals/prayer_saint.htm

Also, I see that the original poster is from Oregon. I would like to caution that in some areas of the country it may be difficult to find Catholic parishes that adhere to the teachings of the Magesterium. (Oregon may be one of those areas.) Randomly walking into a Catholic parish or calling a priest might be dissappointing. I would strongly suggest researching local parishes and praying to the Holy Spirit for guidance.

I will also add that there is a vast array of “Catholic spirituality” which can be seen reflected in the various religious orders. While authentic Catholics should adhere to the teachings of the Magesterium, there are still many, many different ways in which Catholics can practice our faith.

Byzantine Prayers

Awaken to Prayer as a Catholic

Shameless plug :o
Order of St Benedict

Sacred Space

The area you ask for information on (how to express Catholic spirituality) is so vast that all you are likely to recieve is many, many links. Perhaps you could give us an idea of your desires and we could then tell you which specific areas would be best to concentrate on.

There are many important facets of a prayer life, but most people find themselves called to a particular aspect more than others. Have you studied the lives of the saints? If not, I recommend it. If so, which ones spoke to you? And why?

The most common devotions you will hear on this board are saying the rosary and adoration of the blessed sacrament. However, Catholicism has much more to offer. Some saints (and faithful) work to change themselves through internal meditation, contemplation, study, etc. Some prefer to speak with their actions, always conforming their will to the Lord’s through what they DO. (Saint Theresa of Lisieux is the most popular, but I prefer Saint Stanislaus’ phrase: I find a heaven in the midst of saucepans and brooms.) Some are called to do the “common” things: parenthood, marriage, local ministry, etc. Some are called to the extraordinary: missionaries to hostile areas, jailings or even torture for the faith, martyrdom. This might not sound like a list of spirituality practices, but I assure you it is. The way we live our lives, always working to bring our steps in line with the Lord’s, is our path, our journey, our spirituality. Therefore, the life we are called to dictates the expression of our spirituality.

The Eastern church has a concept of deification that more clearly outlines this concept of uniting ourselves to Christ. They emphasize prayer, church attendance, alms giving, fasting, abstaining, and much more all as necessary aspects of this process. However, you might be interested to note that the Eastern churches (of which Catholicism has some 20 of) have much more flexibility even in the communal church services on how this is lived out. For example, during church people might prostrate themselves, make the sign of the cross, etc when not “prescribed” just as the Spirit moves them. The only comparison in the western church is to Charasmatic Catholics, which emphasize the gifts of the Holy Spirit (such as speaking in tongues). But there really is no comparison there. Also, the Eastern churches do have many more fasting days which are strongly held to, but not legalistically. The spiritual director and the person together decide what is best for the person’s physical and spiritual health. In other words, the living out of your spirituality depends entirely on your current spiritual and physical place in life. The point is to always keep moving closer to the Lord. How you do so is so varied a path that you really must give us some clue as to your callings before we even could provide relevant readings for you. More importantly, spirituality is simply not something you can attain through reading, as it must be lived.

I recommend you find your “niche” or calling (through prayer, discernment, and study) and then you can find where in your area you can best live this out.

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