Catholic Stoicism


#1

Often times, I become angry: when people do things wrong to me or others, when they make fun of religious things such as the Eucharist, or when I do something wrong or erroneous myself. I get angry, and sometimes do things I regret afterwards. I rarely harbor hatred, though, because usually my anger towards everything else, I redirect at myself, as I have done for most of my life. But, I see many Catholics, especially older ones, who seem to have developed a wisdom, a stoic attitude that allows them to do what they know is good and right, even when they get angry, sad, etc.; things bother them, they care, but they do not let it affect their behavior.

How can I develop this? I know that many who have it are older, but I would rather not have to wait until I'm elderly to practice it, and I know, such as by the example of saints, that old age isn't required to have it. So what can I do? I pray for it, and will continue to. But are there other spiritual practices I could use to strengthen that attitude in myself? This is difficult for me, especially with some of the mental, physical, and life problems I have, such as OCD, a speech impediment and poverty, which often drive me to anger and depression by themselves. But I hate doing things I know are wrong because of those emotions. So if there is some way I could develop that stoical attitude, please tell me. I would greatly appreciate any advice or techniques here. :)


#2

I promise you that these great Catholics are not stoic about their faith. I go to Mass every day & these are the most faithful. We love God so much.

Volunteer & become closer to the people. Do this!


#3

[quote="scameter18, post:1, topic:180409"]
Often times, I become angry: when people do things wrong to me or others, when they make fun of religious things such as the Eucharist, or when I do something wrong or erroneous myself. I get angry, and sometimes do things I regret afterwards. I rarely harbor hatred, though, because usually my anger towards everything else, I redirect at myself, as I have done for most of my life. But, I see many Catholics, especially older ones, who seem to have developed a wisdom, a stoic attitude that allows them to do what they know is good and right, even when they get angry, sad, etc.; things bother them, they care, but they do not let it affect their behavior.

How can I develop this? I know that many who have it are older, but I would rather not have to wait until I'm elderly to practice it, and I know, such as by the example of saints, that old age isn't required to have it. So what can I do? I pray for it, and will continue to. But are there other spiritual practices I could use to strengthen that attitude in myself? This is difficult for me, especially with some of the mental, physical, and life problems I have, such as OCD, a speech impediment and poverty, which often drive me to anger and depression by themselves. But I hate doing things I know are wrong because of those emotions. So if there is some way I could develop that stoical attitude, please tell me. I would greatly appreciate any advice or techniques here. :)

[/quote]

Hi, there.

As a "Star Trek" fan, I tried to practice the character Spock's stoicism for...weeks. Wasn't fun. When you throw away reaction, often you lose the joyful edges of the hard emotion that can grate at you.

Based on your description, you have a bit of a challenge. Compulsive natures often quickly generate frustration and anger.

But even in the non-compulsive among us, the common reason why we get angry or frustrated is because we are reacting to the non-control we have over others, their behavior, or even ourselves.

So, try to remember that God's plan often encompasses the day-to-day events. Letting go of control, perceived or real, allowing some things to continue, will give you the control you desire. At the same time, don't let opportunities go by where, charitably, you might be able to make a positive change to someone or yourself so that you may find one less thing in the world that gets your attention.

God catches more problems that we believe, I think. But even if He doesn't seem to, it's not necessarily because He doesn't care. Evil still lurks in the world, but God has a reason why He keeps it in play.


#4

[quote="scameter18, post:1, topic:180409"]
Often times, I become angry: when people do things wrong to me or others, when they make fun of religious things such as the Eucharist, or when I do something wrong or erroneous myself. I get angry, and sometimes do things I regret afterwards. I rarely harbor hatred, though, because usually my anger towards everything else, I redirect at myself, as I have done for most of my life. But, I see many Catholics, especially older ones, who seem to have developed a wisdom, a stoic attitude that allows them to do what they know is good and right, even when they get angry, sad, etc.; things bother them, they care, but they do not let it affect their behavior.

How can I develop this? I know that many who have it are older, but I would rather not have to wait until I'm elderly to practice it, and I know, such as by the example of saints, that old age isn't required to have it. So what can I do? I pray for it, and will continue to. But are there other spiritual practices I could use to strengthen that attitude in myself? This is difficult for me, especially with some of the mental, physical, and life problems I have, such as OCD, a speech impediment and poverty, which often drive me to anger and depression by themselves. But I hate doing things I know are wrong because of those emotions. So if there is some way I could develop that stoical attitude, please tell me. I would greatly appreciate any advice or techniques here. :)

[/quote]

First, I would say a devoted prayer life will help a lot. I pray a daily Rosary. At first it seemed like an imposition on my time. After a year's time I look forward to my prayer time. I also have other prayers.

Second, I would suggest a couple of books to read.

Kolbe: Saint of the Immaculate

Stories of Karol: The Unknown Life of John Paul II

Both of these books offer inspiration which I believe will help you in your quest.

God bless


#5

Thank you everyone, really. That is great advice, and I will try to practice all of it. Thanks again, and peace be with all of you. :)


#6

I would also like to learn how to handle things better. I think I will pray for this gift. :)


#7

Perhaps we could pray for each other. :hug1: :slight_smile:


#8

[quote="scameter18, post:1, topic:180409"]
Often times, I become angry: when people do things wrong to me or others, when they make fun of religious things such as the Eucharist, or when I do something wrong or erroneous myself. I get angry, and sometimes do things I regret afterwards. I rarely harbor hatred, though, because usually my anger towards everything else, I redirect at myself, as I have done for most of my life. But, I see many Catholics, especially older ones, who seem to have developed a wisdom, a stoic attitude that allows them to do what they know is good and right, even when they get angry, sad, etc.; things bother them, they care, but they do not let it affect their behavior.

How can I develop this? I know that many who have it are older, but I would rather not have to wait until I'm elderly to practice it, and I know, such as by the example of saints, that old age isn't required to have it. So what can I do? I pray for it, and will continue to. But are there other spiritual practices I could use to strengthen that attitude in myself? This is difficult for me, especially with some of the mental, physical, and life problems I have, such as OCD, a speech impediment and poverty, which often drive me to anger and depression by themselves. But I hate doing things I know are wrong because of those emotions. So if there is some way I could develop that stoical attitude, please tell me. I would greatly appreciate any advice or techniques here. :)

[/quote]

Start small, and step by step work on it. You are not your emotions. :)

The more you live an unindulged life, with few things and worldly entertainments, and spiritual pleasures instead, and the more you pray, the easier it gets.

I've known a few old farmers, who when things go bad, they just chuckle and let it be -- because that's life.


#9

I would love to be like those old farmers then. :slight_smile:


closed #10

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