Catholic Study Bible (Saint Mary's Press)

I have in my possession the “Catholic Study Bible” printed by St. Mary’s Press.

There are these notes in it:

**1st Peter was written possibly by Peter, but most likely a later disciple of Peter’s

2nd Peter was written by an unknown person writing in Peter’s name

1 John was written by an unknown person…

1 Corinthians was written by Paul or a follower of Paul’s**

It also contains, as notes, the following prayers:

Native American:

Weave for us a garment of brightness
May the warp be the white light of the morning
May the weft be the red light of the evening
May the fringes be the falling rain
May the border be the standing rainbow
Thus weave for us a garment of brightness
That we may walk fittingly where birds sing,
That we may walk fittingly where grass is green,
O our Mother the Earth, O our father the Sky

Other prayers refer to the “great Spirit” (Native American Prayers)
And African American Prayers refer to “kwanzaa”

My pastor is considering implementing this Bible in study at our parish… He gave it to me to look it over… what should i tell him about it? :confused:

I googled the title and publisher but can’t find any information on it. Does it have an ISBN? (Long string of numbers with dashes usually above the bar code.) If you have this, you can do more research about this particular edition.

Certainly, at first glance, it sounds infested with New Age if not outright pagan references. Suggest the Ignatius Study Bible instead, it’s faithful.

Sounds like a pile of bull dung to me.

[quote=James_2:24]My pastor is considering implementing this Bible in study at our parish… He gave it to me to look it over… what should i tell him about it? :confused:
[/quote]

Tell him he can’t be serious. He must not have read it first (at least I hope he hasn’t).

Dump it and find another. There are plenty of good study bibles out there. Oxford Press even has one called the “Catholic Study Bible”.

Blessings.

[quote=James_2:24]I have in my possession the “Catholic Study Bible” printed by St. Mary’s Press.

There are these notes in it:

1st Peter was written possibly by Peter, but most likely a later disciple of Peter’s

2nd Peter was written by an unknown person writing in Peter’s name

1 John was written by an unknown person…

1 Corinthians was written by Paul or a follower of Paul’s

[/quote]

This is accepted in the biblical scholar community. It does not deny the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, or the inerrancy of scripture. Frequently, followers of a spiritual teacher would write down his teachings in his name. There is nothing wrong with acknowledging this. It is simply good scholarship.

What about the Native American prayer bothers you? Was it represented as Catholic prayer? In what context was it presented?

Thanks,
Iguana

[quote=iguana27]This is accepted in the biblical scholar community.
[/quote]

Biblical scholarship is not monolithic. Some Biblical scholars accept these ideas, some do not. Unfortunately, Catholic Biblical scholarship has gone down the tubes because no Pope since Pius XII has firmly reigned in modernist scholars, andnow it’s mostly Protestants who defend the Catholic dogma of Biblical inerrancy. However, we still have some good scholars. Here is the list of contributors to a forthcoming book of Catholic Scripture scholarship:

Fr. Michael Kelly (Ph.D.); Fr. Paul Driscoll (Ph.D.) Fr. Brian Harrison (S.T.D.); Fr. John McCarthy (S.T.D.); Ms. Maria Cirurgiao, Ph.D.; Dr. Arthur Sippo; Mr. Sal Ciresi, M.A.; Mr. David Palm, M.A.; Mr. Desmond Birch, M.A.; Mr. Robert Sungenis, M.A. (Ph.D. cd)

Also Fr. Echert from EWTN and brilliant Catholic apologist Gerry Matatics defend this dogma.

I’m confused, please clarify.

Sounds to me like you are talking about the Catholic Youth Bible published by St. Mary’s Press, a Catholic youth ministry company…I was not aware they had a study Bible for adults? or are you using it for a teen/youth Bible study? if the latter, I highly recommend it…
we’ve been using it for Junior and Senior High for several years now…
it’s a devotional Bible for Catholic teens, what a blessing for those of us doing youth ministry and trying to battle agains non-denoms like Young Life.

Two translations available: NAB and NRSV. The prayers and reflections are written with different cultures in mind…we are, after all the universal Church who celebrates and embraces all cultures and honors the diversity of our people, right?

Peace,

[quote=Hananiah]Biblical scholarship is not monolithic.

[/quote]

agreed…

The inerrancy of Scripture does not depend on the identity of the author. That is, it doesn’t matter if I John was written by John or one of his disciples, it is still inerrant.

God Bless,
Iguana

The question of authorship does not concern me for the reasons given by others before me.

However, The Earth is not my Mother and the Sky is not my Father! My Father is God, in Heaven and my mother is my Spiritual Mother the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Using this resource would introduce New Age concepts into your parish.

At my parish we use the Catholic Scripture Study. Each participant uses whichever version they choose. This leads to interesting and insightful discussions related to the various interpretations.

Dump that study Bible your pastor gave you and get the Navarre Bible instead, which is an excellent study Bible and is in accord with the Magisterium.

[quote=parishminister]I’m confused, please clarify.

Sounds to me like you are talking about the Catholic Youth Bible published by St. Mary’s Press, a Catholic youth ministry company…I was not aware they had a study Bible for adults? or are you using it for a teen/youth Bible study? if the latter, I highly recommend it…
we’ve been using it for Junior and Senior High for several years now…
it’s a devotional Bible for Catholic teens, what a blessing for those of us doing youth ministry and trying to battle agains non-denoms like Young Life.

Two translations available: NAB and NRSV. The prayers and reflections are written with different cultures in mind…we are, after all the universal Church who celebrates and embraces all cultures and honors the diversity of our people, right?

Peace,
[/quote]

If it is this Bible, I am familiar with it. It is basically a pathetically political correct throwback to the seventies. I recommend your pastor ditch it and use instead the Ignatius Study Bible instead. It has a beautiful, accurate translation (the RSV-CE), it has top-notch articles and footnotes, it has study and practical growth questions on each chapter, and it is totally CATHOLIC.

I am not sure about the Bible you refer to or how good it is. However, I do think there are similarities of Native American prayers and the Prayers of St. Francis of Assisi. This is from the www.monksofadoration.org
One aspect of St. Francis of Assisi’s relationship with nature
was the supernatural insight he had when looking at it. All creation
is in some way a reflection of God and His attributes. The saints,
by a special gift of the Holy Spirit, saw in the animals, plants,
water, stars, etc. lessons about God. Our Lord Himself referred to
the lilies of the field and the birds of the air as an example of
His Father’s providential care for each one of us. (Matthew 6:26-32
Also, the saints had a great sense of thanksgiving for all creation
because they saw God’s great love for us reflected in it. This
special insight into God’s creation which St. Fancis had is shown in
his famous inspiration called the “Canticle of Brother Sun.”

The Canticle of Brother Sun

Most High Almighty Good Lord, Yours are praise, glory, honor and
all blessings; To You alone! Most High, do they belong, and no man
is worthy of speaking Your Name!
Be praised, Lord, with all Your creatures, and above all our
Brother Sun, who gives us the day by which You light our way, and
who is beautiful, radiant and with his great splendor is a symbol to
us of You, O Most High!
And be praised, Lord, for our Sister Moon and the Stars. You
created them in the heavens bright, precious and beautiful!
And be praised, Lord, for our Brother the Wind and for the air
and the clouds and for fair weather and for all other through which
You sustain Your creatures.
And be praised, Lord, for our Sister Water, so useful, and
humble, and chaste!
And be praised, my Lord, for our Brother Fire, through whom You
light up the night and who is handsome, joyful, robust, and strong!
And be praised, my Lord, for our Sister, Mother Earth, who
supports and carries us and produces the diverse fruits and colorful
flowers and trees!
Praise and bless the Lord and give thanks to Him and serve Him
with great humility!
Be praised, my Lord, for our Sister, bodily Death from whom no
living man can escape!
Woe only to those who die in mortal sin; but blessed are those
who have done Your most holy will; for the second death can cause
them no harm!

( I am not sure what I did besides copy and paste, but now it is in bold print:confused: )

I recently read a Native American saying that said “How can I worship the Great Spirit if I do not honor that which He Created?”

I think with all the accusations of “worship of Mary”, Catholics are hyper sensitive to the issue. We can honor things as wonderful creations of God, because we can see God’s greatness through His creations. I think that is all that Native American prayer is trying to point out.

For those who wish to condemn this publication without full knowledge, just thought you might want to consider that in addition to the Nihil Obstat and Imprimatur for the text of the New American Bible, it carries the same for all articles and introductions contained within…last time I checked, these official declarations mean that the approving clergy found it to be free from doctrinal or moral error.
So, if you don’t like the articles on how to live the faith, or mentioning other cultural traditions which tie into Scripture, then don’t use it.
But don’t trash the work of people who spent years developing a devotional Bible for Catholic youth, something that was sorely missing and needed. It’s a great resource. Don’t critique it if you haven’t taken the time to actually review it.

Peace…

Sorry, to the original poster James 2:24…are we talking about the CatholicYouth Bible here, or something else? Not much need to continue this thread if we are talking about different Bibles :slight_smile:

I’m sorry but I don’t trust something MERELY because it has an imprematur. Sure it’d be nice if we lived in a perfect world and we could trust the bishops all the time. But look at how some of the bishops behave, and some of the evil things that they let into the church.

We don’t need other religious prayers in our catholic bibles. I guess I’m a fundamentalist, but I believe that calling the earth MOTHER and the sky FATHER is theologically wrong; it’s incorrect: HERETICAL.

Catholics need their faith built up on solid ground, if I was leading a scripture study with those in my parish (which i currently do), I would make sure that the teaching is solidly catholic and not merely pandering to the huey of the world.

But this is just knee jerk, I’d have to read it to know.

I have to strongly disagree. If a book says it’s written by Peter (like II Peter does) and it was not written till years after his death, this book is in error and this is heresy to anyone who holds to inerrancy. (See
Providentissimus Deus and Divino Afflante Spiritu.) When we have a Bible that has errors it opens up to all sorts of attacks from unbelievers. It also hurts the faith of those who trust in the Bible.

I’ll lay it out straight; Peter wrote both of his epistles. Paul wrote all the ones that begin with his name. And yes - Daniel wrote Daniel!

[quote=allthewhile]We don’t need other religious prayers in our catholic bibles. I guess I’m a fundamentalist, but I believe that calling the earth MOTHER and the sky FATHER is theologically wrong; it’s incorrect: HERETICAL.

[/quote]

So are you saying that St Francis was a heretic? Or that he had heretical writings? I would say that the Catholic Church does not believe that his writings contain heresy, or he would not have been canonized.

[quote=J_Chrysostomos]I have to strongly disagree. If a book says it’s written by Peter (like II Peter does) and it was not written till years after his death, this book is in error and this is heresy to anyone who holds to inerrancy. (See
Providentissimus Deus and Divino Afflante Spiritu.) When we have a Bible that has errors it opens up to all sorts of attacks from unbelievers. It also hurts the faith of those who trust in the Bible.

I’ll lay it out straight; Peter wrote both of his epistles. Paul wrote all the ones that begin with his name. And yes - Daniel wrote Daniel!
[/quote]

I choose to accept the biblical scholarship of those like Fr. Raymond Brown, and acknowledge that even if the NT books were written by pseudonymous writers, they are still inspired as the church proclaimed when it instituted the canon.

There is nothing wrong with believing otherwise.

God Bless,
Iguana

[quote=iguana27]So are you saying that St Francis was a heretic? Or that he had heretical writings? I would say that the Catholic Church does not believe that his writings contain heresy, or he would not have been canonized.
[/quote]

In reading the post which contains the Canticle from St. Francis, I notice a MAJOR difference between that and the Native American Prayer in question. St. Francis referred to the sun, moon, wind, etc. as brothers and sisters NOT Mother or Father! He was still putting them in a position of having been Created, not being the Creator! Calling the earth Mother, makes the earth a Creator.

He also repeatedly praises the Lord only for these creations! His goal was for us to let the splendor of nature reveal more to us about the Creator himself and thus bring glory to God. The Native American Prayer here gives glory to “Mother Earth” itself, not God.

Just because someone spent a lot of time working on something doesn’t make it above criticism, especially by those of us who have taken the time to review it and have developed an informed opinion of it. Similarly, just because there was a lack of devotional bibles for Catholic youth, doesn’t mean people should necessarily embrace a flawed one. Nobody here has criticized the NAB, only the study materials in this particular edition. Also, the fact that something has an imprimater doesn’t carry as much weight as it used to. If the late Fr. Brown (may he rest in peace) give himself one for his New Jerome Bible Commentary, there is something wrong with the process. If someone wants to defend this volume, and to aflict the youth in their parish with this feminized, PC “study Bible,” that’s up to them. It is equally up to others if they refuse to do so and state their reasons why. The exchange of ideas works both ways.

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