Catholic teaching on the End Times

I’m Catholic and I’m a little confused about the Catholic teaching on what’s going to happen at the end of the world. I know that some Protestants believe these events will happen.

[LIST=1]
*]First, the rapture. Which is when God will snatch up all believers either before, in the middle of, or after the tribulation period
*]The tribulation period, this is when the Antichrist (a literal human person) will come and rule for 7 years. The first 3 1/2 years will be filled will peace. And the next 3 1/2 year will be filled will chaos.
*]At the end of the 7 year tribulation. Jesus comes back. Defeats the Antichrist and Satan, and Satan is imprisoned in an abyss. While Satan’s imprisoned in this abyss, Jesus will rule the earth for 1,000 years.
*]After 1,000 years Satan will be loosed from his prison and make an final act of rebellion against God, and will lose and be cast in the lake of fire
*]After this, the Last Judgment will happen. And that’s the end.
[/LIST]

What’s the difference between what they believe and what Catholics believe about these five events?

Please go easy on me. :o No witty responses like “you’ve been watching too much History Channel” :stuck_out_tongue: I’m just learning folks. :blush:

My thought is why worry about it? Most likely none of us alive now will live to see the end of the entire world, but everyone of us will have our own world end the moment when we die and that is what we need to be prepared for. Could be a car accident today or at the end of a long disease 54 yrs from now that brings an end to our own world. Just get & keep yourself right with God and inspire others and make the most of the life His has granted you and be at peace regarding all else.

"The three schools of thought are: millennialism, amillennialism and premillennialism ,

As far as the millennium goes, we tend to agree with Augustine and, derivatively, with the amillennialists. The Catholic position has thus historically been “amillennial” (as has been the majority Christian position in general, including that of the Protestant Reformers), though Catholics do not typically use this term. The Church has rejected the premillennial position, sometimes called “millenarianism” (see the Catechism of the Catholic Church 676). In the 1940s the Holy Office judged that premillennialism “cannot safely be taught,” though the Church has not dogmatically defined this issue.

The amillennial view interprets Revelation 20 symbolically and sees the millennium not as an earthly golden age in which the world will be totally Christianized, but as the present period of Christ’s rule in heaven and on the earth through his Church. This was the view of the Protestant Reformers and is still the most common view among traditional Protestants, though not among most of the newer Evangelical and Fundamentalist groups.

Amillennialists also believe in the coexistence of good and evil on earth until the end. The tension that exists on earth between the righteous and the wicked will be resolved only by Christ’s return at the end of time. The golden age of the millennium is instead the heavenly reign of Christ with the saints, in which the Church on earth participates to some degree, though not in the glorious way it will at the Second Coming.

Amillennialists point out that the thrones of the saints who reign with Christ during the millennium appear to be set in heaven (Rev. 20:4; cf. 4:4, 11:16) and that the text nowhere states that Christ is on earth during this reign with the saints.

They explain that, although the world will never be fully Christianized until the Second Coming, the millennium does have effects on earth in that Satan is bound in such a way that he cannot deceive the nations by hindering the preaching of the gospel (Rev. 20:3). They point out that Jesus spoke of the necessity of “binding the strong man” (Satan) in order to plunder his house by rescuing people from his grip (Matt. 12:29). When the disciples returned from a tour of preaching the gospel, rejoicing at how demons were subject to them, Jesus declared, “I saw Satan fall like lightning” (Luke 10:18). Thus for the gospel to move forward at all in the world, it is necessary for Satan to be bound in one sense, even if he may still be active in attacking individuals (1 Pet. 5:8).

The millennium is a golden age not when compared to the glories of the age to come, but in comparison to all prior ages of human history, in which the world was swallowed in pagan darkness. Today, a third of the human race is Christian and even more than that have repudiated pagan idols and embraced the worship of the God of Abraham.

With respect to the rapture, Catholics certainly believe that the event of our gathering together to be with Christ will take place, though they do not generally use the word “rapture” to refer to this event (somewhat ironically, since the term “rapture” is derived from the text of the Latin Vulgate of 1 Thess. 4:17—“we will be caught up,” [Latin: rapiemur]). "

catholic.com/tracts/the-rapture

Jesus ascended to the throne coming in clouds and glory to sit down at the right hand of God the Father. That happened 2000 years ago approx. That was the start of the 1000 years. Then shall appear the sign of the son of man in heaven, and that happened in Acts with what Stephen saw. 1000 years is not literal it is meant to portray a time of completeness. All that time 1 is all 000 is long. During this time Satan is bound, and the gospel goes out and dominates everywhere it goes, swords are beaten into ploughshares (peace not war), the wolf (unclean) will dwell at peace with the lamb (clean) etc, (Gentiles and Jews fulfilled by the sheet that Peter saw in Acts 10). Jesus is ruling with a rod of iron, so are the saints who overcome.

But immediately before the time that the 1000 years is complete and Jesus Christ comes back at the end of the age, to resurrect the body and judge worthy or unworthy, Satan will be loosed to deceive nations, therein is the son of perdition. The Church will either receive persecution or expect persecution. It is much like the time of Esther. The Jews were going to be wiped out by decree, but they weren’t. There was an overriding decree that didn’t prevent the first decree but instead prevented the first decree being enacted. It is the Gog Magog of Ezekiel 37-38 that refers to the time of Esther and is picked up again in Revelation.

And that is the end, this system is all over, and the Kingdom of God is no longer opposed.

I’m not. This is solely asked out of interest.

My thought is why worry about it? Most likely none of us alive now will live to see the end of the entire world, but everyone of us will have our own world end the moment when we die and that is what we need to be prepared for. Could be a car accident today or at the end of a long disease 54 yrs from now that brings an end to our own world. Just get & keep yourself right with God and inspire others and make the most of the life His has granted you and be at peace regarding all else.

Read David Currie’s great book, Rapture–The End Times Error That Leaves the Bible Behind.

Currie is a former fundamentalist Protestant pastor who converted to Catholicism. This book is a wonderful analysis of Catholic end-times teaching, which is different than Evangelical Protestant teaching. The Catholic end-times teaching is more in-line with the Bible.

And there is no “rapture” in the Catholic teaching.

Look up in the Catechism of the Catholic Church the paragraphs 668-682. There you will find what the Church teaches on the End Times (ie. the time before Christ’s Second Coming).

As Catholics, we reject points 1, 3, and 4, and hold that our LORD’s appearing coincides with 5).

We hold to a final tribulation, but not necessarily 7 years in length. We also have no position on events surrounding the tribulation as described by end-timers, such as rebuilding of the Jerusalem temple, etc.

ICXC NIKA

I would encourage any Catholic wanting to understand the Bible to look underneath. Below the text of Catholic Bibles is the Catholic interpretation that I don’t think protestant Bibles have.

It’s my understanding that Catholics believe that there are many antichrists but that the Antichrist already has come and gone. We believe he was Nero Caesar, because his name adds up to 666. He also did kill St. Peter and St. Paul (the 2 witnesses?). .

As to the numbers, 1,000, etc., these may also be biblical, not literal, like the story of creation with the world being created in 7 days.

The Catholic Bible states which parts of the Book of Revelation we believe already occurred and which are to come. Just check the small print and encourage others with questions to do the same.

This sounds like a very interesting book. :thumbsup:

This sounds like a very interesting book. :thumbsup:

can’t recommend it highly enough… a real eye opener in a lot of ways

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