Catholic University?


#1

Hello I am still discerning whether or not i will become a priest but i am definately sure i want to atend a catholic university. /the ones i have looked at liek Boston College, Notre Dame, CUA, U of Dallas are just out of my price range. Without giving otu too many details i am not poor enough to get good enough financial aid and i aint rich enough to pay for it on my own ( i should say my family isnt rich enough). So what are some options to get a good catholic education that isnt too expensive?


#2

If you like Notre Dame, maybe you should consider Holy Cross College (and for any girls, St. Mary's). HCC is part of the ND community--you can take classes there, tryout for sports, apply to work at ND Vision, etc. without paying the high cost. Of course, you will take most of your classes at HCC. The class sizes are small (possibly about 20 people and under, if I recall correctly), but I don't know if that's what size you're looking for. But anyway, Holy Cross is very affordable. I've heard of a Catholic college that will absorb your debt if you enter the religious life or priesthood; I think it's in the New England area. Maybe you can find more info on that.


#3

Thank you i looked at the tuition prices and it is affordale, does anone know of any other colleges?


#4

My two best friends went to St. Vincent college in Latrobe, Pa and they loved it. It's run by the Benedictines. stvincent.edu/


#5

Before deciding not to consider a school for financial reasons, you might want to look into financial aid. Catholic schools have a strong reputation for providing financial support to students. For instance, here is the start of your research into the U of Dallas.
Undergrad
udallas.edu/offices/finaid/index.html
graduate
udallas.edu/braniff/ma/financialaid.html
The people in their financial aid office are friendly and supportive: what have you got to lose-beside potential debt?
You might be able to serve in your dormitory in exchange for a reduction in housing costs if you wish to study away from home.
If you eventually discern a calling to the priesthood you may wish to get in touch with the Knights of Columbus to discuss vocational support opportunities,
May God bless you.


#6

Also, before choosing a Catholic school, make sure that it really is Catholic and not just Catholic in name.


#7

[quote="McDale721, post:6, topic:294487"]
Also, before choosing a Catholic school, make sure that it really is Catholic and not just Catholic in name.

[/quote]

Very good advice! There are many "Catholic" colleges that do not deserve the name Catholic.


#8

[quote="Dorothy, post:7, topic:294487"]
Very good advice! There are many "Catholic" colleges that do not deserve the name Catholic.

[/quote]

Which ones do deserve the name Catholic? I too have some misgivings after ND had Obama as its speaker.


#9

[quote="aicirt, post:8, topic:294487"]
Which ones do deserve the name Catholic? I too have some misgivings after ND had Obama as its speaker.

[/quote]

I know there are more, but here a few that truly teach Catholicism. They would not have speakers invited that would promote morals or teachings that Catholics should not adhere to.

Christendom College
Acquinas College
Steubenville


#10

[quote="aicirt, post:8, topic:294487"]
Which ones do deserve the name Catholic? I too have some misgivings after ND had Obama as its speaker.

[/quote]

This site gives excellent reporting of what is happening in Catholic colleges and universities, and a search could probably be done to find out which ones are faithful:

cardinalnewmansociety.org

A friend of mine sent her daughter to a public university in Florida that had a Catholic Church nearby that is known for its tremendous ministry to the Catholic students at that university. In fact, it was written up in the National Catholic Register some time back.

They have retreats, socials, bible studies, Eucharistic adoration, Rosary, and much more for the Catholic students. Even some non-Catholics became interested. It is very well attended.


#11

As others have pointed out, the term "Catholic college" has little meaning in many (if not most) institutions. They may have been founded by Catholics and retained the title of "Catholic" out of a sense of tradition (and they may even have a monastery or convent on-campus), but that doesn't reflect the way the educate their students.

[quote="Dorothy, post:9, topic:294487"]
I know there are more, but here a few that truly teach Catholicism. They would not have speakers invited that would promote morals or teachings that Catholics should not adhere to.

Christendom College
Acquinas College
Steubenville

[/quote]

I don't have any direct experience with the colleges listed above, so I'll defer to the recommendations of others. If you're going for a theology degree, you might want to check them out.

One recommendation... I'd focus more on the program of study itself and the background of the people teaching them more than the college's reputation as a whole. Different colleges have different strengths and "flavors" to their degree programs, and just because one program of study within a college has a particular strength/weakness doesn't mean that it is like that across the board. For example, William & Mary offers many degrees, but is primarily known for their law and public administration programs -- I hear that some of their other degree programs are rather "weak". UC Berkley, while having a reputation as an "ultra-liberal" school, has a strong & no-nonsense (i.e. no neo-hippies) engineering college.

Last word of advice: don't limit your search to "Catholic schools". I'm sure others on CAF would disagree, but you can get just as good an education from a secular college as you can a Catholic college. If you do indeed go in to the priesthood, you're going to be expected to understand the belief systems others (note I said "understand", not "subscribe to"), and going to a secular college would definitely expose you to that in ways you are unlikely to find in a primarily-Catholic school. In short, don't close your mind to any opportunity -- God can "work" through a secular school just as easily as He can a Catholic school.

BTW, it's great to hear that you're discerning the priesthood. Good luck on your journey!

God bless,
Dean


#12

I myself am discerning (see my thread, Spiritual Frustration, in this section of the forum). I went to Penn State and did take one world religions class. It mainly studied the major religions in general, Judaism, Islam and Christianity. We didn't go real far in depth, but with my Catholic education before college (K-High School) I already had learned a lot more in depth about the world's religions. I think that it was good to go to a public/secular college, just to experience being around a majority of people that weren't Catholic, where there wasn't weekly Mass held on the facility etc.

Also, as I posted above, St. Vincent is a very Catholic college, from what I saw. It's run mainly by the Benedictine monks and I did sit in on a few classes there when trying to decide on a college, they did keep Catholic teachings at a priority in the classes I observed. It also has a seminary in it as well, not requiring of course to become a member of the Benedictine community. My friend who is also discerning said it was helpful being around and in the same classes as seminarians because he was able to talk to them on a day to day basis and get advice on discernment.


#13

Stay on topic please! The OP asked about financial aid, tuition costs, and Catholic schools. Any further posts that debate the "catholicity" of a particular university or college will result in infractions.


#14

While studying at the University of South Florida, the administration gave me permission to take one semester at Chaminade University of Honolulu (Marianist). Its probably the least expensive Catholic university in America. I wanted to learn to surf. Mission accomplished.

Seriously though, Chaminade was wonderful. Small university within a very short distance from Waikiki Beach. The Marianist priests and brothers were very personable. We also had a few Jesuits on campus. Outdoor Mass was generally the norm.


#15

I am definatley considering St. Vincent as it is very close to me. Will i know how much financial aid i will get beofre i join a college because i dont want to join an expensive college thinking i will get x amount of financial aid and i recieve a lot less?


#16

St. Joseph University In Philadelphia $18,000/year
Ava Maria In Naples Florida, $50,000/Year
Holy Family University in Philadelphia $24,940/year
St Marys College in Maryland. $12,485 In State/$25,045 Out of State/year

Hope that helps


#17

Thomas Aquinas College. If you're like 75% (or more) of the students, you may end up with a very good financial aid package. Talk to the financial aid administrator.


#18

Another option might be to discuss the possibility of transferring community college credits for basic required courses to save money. You could still work on your formation ( maybe enrolling in the Marian catechist program through Father Hardon's website or something similarly Catholic and affordable) so that you feel that you are growing in faith while waiting your turn to take the formal college theology courses at a more expensive institution.


#19

Have you considered the Franciscan University of Steubenville?

franciscan.edu/


#20

If I were you, I would find a way to attend the Franciscan University of Steubenville, or the University of Dallas, in that sequence. You need to be in the midst of like minded people who are your own age. The secular world will always be out there.


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