Catholic view of baptism of Holy Spirit?


#1

I am being drawn to Catholicism and am invistigating it. One questions that I have is about the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. I come from a Pentacostal background with the understanding that after water baptism there is the baptism of Holy Spirit like occurred in the book of Acts that was always accompanied by praying in tongues. What is the Catholic Church’s teaching on what it is and how it is applied today?

Sincerely,
Victoria Lannon


#2

The answer is the Sacrament of Confirmation

Catechism of the Catholic Church says this:

1288 "From that time on the apostles, in fulfillment of Christ’s will, imparted to the newly baptized by the laying on of hands the gift of the Spirit that completes the grace of Baptism. For this reason in the Letter to the Hebrews the doctrine concerning Baptism and the laying on of hands is listed among the first elements of Christian instruction. the imposition of hands is rightly recognized by the Catholic tradition as the origin of the sacrament of Confirmation, which in a certain way perpetuates the grace of Pentecost in the Church."98

Here is a Biblical example:
[font=Arial]Acts 8:4[/font][font=Arial] Now those who were scattered went about preaching the word. 5 Philip went down to a city of Sama’ria, and proclaimed to them the Christ. 6 And the multitudes with one accord gave heed to what was said by Philip, when they heard him and saw the signs which he did. 7 For unclean spirits came out of many who were possessed, crying with a loud voice; and many who were paralyzed or lame were healed. 8 So there was much joy in that city…[/font][font=Arial]14[/font][font=Arial] Now when the apostles at Jerusalem heard that Sama’ria had received the word of God, they sent to them Peter and John, 15 who came down and prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit; 16 for it had not yet fallen on any of them, but they had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. 17 Then they laid their hands on them and they received the Holy Spirit[/font]
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[font=Arial]Does this help at all?[/font]
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#3

Yes, Martino, that does help; that this laying on of hands is a regular practice in the Church, rather than and “optional”. In the book of Acts, this act was accompanied by praying on tongues. Does this also occur when someone is Confirmed in the Catholic Church?

Victoria Lannon


#4

[quote=Victoria Lannon]Yes, Martino, that does help; that this laying on of hands is a regular practice in the Church, rather than and “optional”. In the book of Acts, this act was accompanied by praying on tongues. Does this also occur when someone is Confirmed in the Catholic Church?

Victoria Lannon
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show me what you are talking about by “praying on tongues”…i dont really recall that in Scripture. i know that the apostles spoke in tongues at Pentecost but i never read that was the norm and it wasnt mentioned in the passage that i cited from Acts either.

but to answer your question praying on tongues is not part of the Confirmation Rite.


#5

[quote=Victoria Lannon]Yes, Martino, that does help; that this laying on of hands is a regular practice in the Church, rather than and “optional”. In the book of Acts, this act was accompanied by praying on tongues. Does this also occur when someone is Confirmed in the Catholic Church?

[/quote]

The sacrament of confirmation grants the Holy Spirit fully to the recipient, including all the gifts He wishes to grant to the person, including praying in tongues.

However, as a pentacostal, you are aware that the gifts are not forced upon a person, but rather accepted by them. Many, many Catholics either do not know about these gifts, or choose not to practice them, and therefore they are not made manifest. We as Catholics believe that these “charismatic” gifts are not necessary for salvation.

Those who later learn of the gifts and wish to learn to move in them undergo a prayer processes which we also call “Baptism in the Spirit.” We do not consider it a sacrament. It does not give any additional grace. It is a “sacramental”, which helps the person to use the grace which they have already recieved. Catholics who choose to follow this path of spirtuality are called “charismatics.” Charismatic Catholics very frequently manifest the gift of tongues, prophesy, etc.

Josh


#6

[quote=threej_lc]The sacrament of confirmation grants the Holy Spirit fully to the recipient, including all the gifts He wishes to grant to the person, including praying in tongues.

However, as a pentacostal, you are aware that the gifts are not forced upon a person, but rather accepted by them. Many, many Catholics either do not know about these gifts, or choose not to practice them, and therefore they are not made manifest. We as Catholics believe that these “charismatic” gifts are not necessary for salvation.

Those who later learn of the gifts and wish to learn to move in them undergo a prayer processes which we also call “Baptism in the Spirit.” We do not consider it a sacrament. It does not give any additional grace. It is a “sacramental”, which helps the person to use the grace which they have already recieved. Catholics who choose to follow this path of spirtuality are called “charismatics.” Charismatic Catholics very frequently manifest the gift of tongues, prophesy, etc.

Josh
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great answer!


#7

The gifts of the Holy Spirit you speak of are mentioned in the Catechism of the Catholic Church briefly as being “special” and “extraordinary” and "gratuitous."2003. Grace is first and foremost the gift of the Spirit who justifies and sanctifies us. But grace also includes the gifts that the Spirit grants us to associate us with his work, to enable us to collaborate in the salvation of others and in the growth of the Body of Christ, the Church. There are sacramental graces, gifts proper to the different sacraments. There are furthermore special graces, also called charisms after the Greek term used by St. Paul and meaning “favor,” “gratuitous gift,” “benefit.” Whatever their character - sometimes it is extraordinary, such as the gift of miracles or of tongues - charisms are oriented toward sanctifying grace and are intended for the common good of the Church. They are at the service of charity which builds up the Church.

When they are authentic, the Catholic Church recognizes them as true gifts of the Holy Spirit but the Church does not consider them as gifts that are given to each believer but as gifts given to whomever the Spirit wills. This is indicated in chapter 12 of 1 Corinthians where Paul says, “[size=2]To one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, [/size]to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the ability to distinguish between spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues.” (verses 7-10) And later when he says, “[size=2]Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Do all work miracles? [/size]Do all possess gifts of healing? Do all speak with tongues? Do all interpret?” (verses 29-30)

Although many Catholic saints have had such gifts, neither the gift of tongues nor any of the other special gifts of the Holy Spirit is to be considered, in itself, a sign of personal sanctity or an indication of a special importance in the Church, for even Balaam’s a** was given the gift of tongues.:smiley:


#8

[quote=Todd Easton].[/indent]When they are authentic, the Catholic Church recognizes them as true gifts of the Holy Spirit but the Church does not consider them as gifts that are given to each believer but as gifts given to whomever the Spirit wills. This is indicated in chapter 12 of 1 Corinthians

Todd, I think your answer was expressed accurately and well. If I may building from your quote from the Catechism, I would like to emphasize that all these gift (Tongues included) as we are taught are never given for the individual alone. Each and every gift is given to empower that person in his or her’s service (ministry) to the Church.
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#9

BTW. How about being slain in the Spirit? I have never found a passage on it in the Bible and the fact that people can take the Eucharist and still walk is kind of scary to me.


#10

I think that you don’t have to worry about the specifics. I live in the Covington KY Diocese and we have charismatic groups in several parishes. We also have a once a month charismatic Mass that brings together all the different Parish groups. I came from a Pentecostal background as well. I feel very comfortable in the Church. It is so uplifting to see little nuns in full habits, hands lifted high praising Jesus.


#11

I am Catholic and I received the Baptism of the Spirit. I didn't really know what was happening at first and wish the church would help people to prepare for it. I was a totally different person after- I was more interested in learning more about my faith and read a lot of books. I started going to mass everyday and I also started saying the Liturgy of the hours, the rosary. I didn't get the gift of tongues but we all receive different gifts. When you are that close to a being that resides where yesterday, today, and tomorrow are all one-you are left with something-some people don't age past that time, some receive the gift of healing or precognition or the gift of speaking in tongues.
There are healing masses and I found that my experiences were more profound after having the Baptism of the Spirit. Sometimes I would leave church and didn't want to talk to anyone because the feeling of peace I received was just so different and beautiful-we can't normally feel that kind of peace on our own. When I got home I was usually so tired that I needed to sleep.
But this happened to me even though I wasn't in church going to a healing mass. I blessed myself with the gifts of Jerusalem-which included a cross of Christ. I felt an invisible thumb being pressed on my forehead and this lasted for a couple of minutes-then I felt the same peace I felt in church.
A lot of things happened since that time-all good.


#12

Great post!


#13

There is only one baptism and that is with running water in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.
There are no other baptisms.


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