Catholic vs Protestant Cemetaries


#1

I learned something today. Methodists and Lutherans have there own cemetaries. My question is… are they closed to other denominations??

#2 question-- Are Catholic cemetaries closed to non RCC??

#3 question-- If yes to #2, does it tick folks off that it is??

I received a fair amount of ribbing over the fact that supposedly RCC cemetaries are closed to non. I actually never considered yes no or indifferent.

Thanks

Eric


#2

The ground at Catholic cemeteries is blessed or consecrated. I don’t know if the grounds at cemeteries of other faiths are.

Those who have committed suicide or were never baptised are, I believe, now allowed to be buried in a Catholic cemetery since the Church cannot know the status of their souls after death or make a presumption about their fate.


#3

[quote=Eden]The ground at Catholic cemeteries is blessed or consecrated. I don’t know if the grounds at cemeteries of other faiths are.

Those who have committed suicide or were never baptised are, I believe, now allowed to be buried in a Catholic cemetery since the Church cannot know the status of their souls after death or make a presumption about their fate.
[/quote]

I always wonder about stuff like “the ground has to be blessed” or you “cant be cremated” “can donate organs” none of it has to matter because

what if one dies in a industrial accident and burns to death, or dies at sea or in the air or is blown up all nasty yes but it cannot matter about particular cemeteries or blessed ground because of these things.


#4

[quote=Kitty Chan]I always wonder about stuff like “the ground has to be blessed” or you “cant be cremated” “can donate organs” none of it has to matter because

what if one dies in a industrial accident and burns to death, or dies at sea or in the air or is blown up all nasty yes but it cannot matter about particular cemeteries or blessed ground because of these things.
[/quote]

I think the difference is that in an accident you do not will it. You had no choice in the matter. Similar to a person who is sterile through no fault of their own. That would not be a sin but intentionally sterilizing yourself would be.


#5

hmm that makes sense that you will it or chose it.

So cemetaries should be blessed because someone is choosing to be buried there? I dont know if around where I live any are particular they seem to be city owned. There is a few old pioneer type churches that had their own graveyards but thats it.

Mind you there is sections in the cemetaries ie for the veterns. The only one that has a separate cemetary is the chinese. They all seem open to any and all. But I live in Canada I will have to check into it.

The only thing I have found so far is a organization called the memorial society for a $25 life membership your loved ones are guarenteed NOT to be harased by funeral directors to get a bigger nice casket to honor you. Or the funeral home loses the contract if they do. By membership you are guarenteed to just get the simple casket or urn and no pushing for extras. OR telling your loved ones that the simple casket is for bums and welfare people.

Which in Canada is a lie anyway as they end up at the University donated to science. Wow I bet thats another question too??


#6

Funny, I was just thinking about that recently…

Catholic church where I attended Mass yesterday morning has a very simple, very well kept cemetery behind the church and a crypt chapel where bishops, priests, religious, and some lay people are buried. Earliest grave c. 1870. Older outdoor graves have been restored as time and weather have worn them.

Episcopal church (where I work as a secretary) has an historic graveyard (earliest grave c. 1700) with a columbarium (most recent interment January 2006). By policy, the gravestones are left to age and, if they break apart or fall down, they are not restored – to the dismay of the local historical society. Current thinking of the rector and vestry is that they show “from dust we are and to dust we will return” However the shrubs and grounds are well kept.

Unitarian Church, (which I passed on my way to an ecumenical Lent service), had a graveyard not as old as the Episcopal church’s but the gravestones had all deteriorated much more quickly and the foliage and vines had completely taken over so that there wasn’t so much as a path through the cemetery. This cemetary is about the same age as the Catholic.

Lutheran Church (where this week’s ecumenical service was held, with the preacher being our own Catholic pastor, who did a great faith/works sermon), the grave yard was much like the Episcopalian one, although not quite as old, probably about 1750.

Any how, I was impressed by the Catholic respect for the bodily remains and memories of those who had passed into larger life, while musing on on how the cemeteries of the protestants grew less and less respectful of the bodies of the dead and more ready to let them decay and allow their monuments to fall and be taken over by the elements. My wanderings today illustrated for me the reality of the Catholic belief in the resurrection of the body, and the Catholic understanding of the communion of saints. Funny how, the further removed from the Catholic Church the cemeteries are the less reverence is shown to the remains of those who have gone before us.

Perhaps this is just my region of the country, but it is interesting.

:twocents:


#7

kaygee

thats interesting, now Im going to be more observant. sounds like you live in a older area. In the city near me there is no more “church cemetaries” only in the country churches.

Mind you my parents are in the building in a urn a columbarium its called. Mom didnt want to be outside.

Whereas her mom didnt want a gravestone because it held you down.

In my husbands hometown in British Columbia there is a artificial set of flowers on every grave. But its not allowed in the city here. To much for the groundskeepers to take care of. If you saw the first one you would be impressed and the one in the city you would not be.

But then in China they only have space for the skull and its only for 5yrs or so then out it goes, there is simply no space.

But for saints and the famous they all have their places secured forever. And are tourist zones to boot. The little guy is only remembered by their family and friends for a while.

Which is depressing until one remembers that although it sounds like a Hallmark card it is a truth regardless. That God remembers us even if others dont or forget.


#8

Whereas her mom didnt want a gravestone because it held you down. :eek:

I find that along the lines of “Wearing Red to someone’s Funeral”

I don’t how much of a superstition that is, but whenever my Mother-in-law would start in on me I would give her a warning:

“Back off or I will wear Red at your funeral” :mad:

She would get blustering mad :mad: , but she would also shut up. :rolleyes:

Superstitions… :rolleyes:


#9

[quote=Kitty Chan]what if one dies in a industrial accident and burns to death, or dies at sea or in the air or is blown up all nasty
[/quote]

Now this is what I call a cheery thought! :rotfl:


#10

[quote=b_justb]Now this is what I call a cheery thought! :rotfl:
[/quote]

:rotfl:


#11

[quote=JoeyWarren]Whereas her mom didnt want a gravestone because it held you down. :eek:

I find that along the lines of “Wearing Red to someone’s Funeral”

I don’t how much of a superstition that is, but whenever my Mother-in-law would start in on me I would give her a warning: She would get blustering mad :mad: , but she would also shut up. :rolleyes:

Superstitions… :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Reminds me of the time when my son was young and the church was having a pack them in like sardines event. Anyway they were giving out goldfish. Im on the floor with my son looking in this bucket, the lady beside be says why dont you just take the remaining ones? I count and say Oh theres 13 I cant do that its unlucky.

Then there was that shoe beside me. I look up to the face of our pastor. He says and just what does a lady whom considers herself a christian, worry about superstious things? As I knelt there on my knees believe me it was a moment in life. :o :slight_smile:

A bunch of stammering on my part, he laughed and helped me up. Ive never been superstious since. And did take the 13 fish :rolleyes:

Besides I needed the extra water in case a industrial accident comes up :smiley:


#12

[quote=Kitty Chan]I always wonder about stuff like “the ground has to be blessed” or you “cant be cremated” “can donate organs” none of it has to matter because…
[/quote]

Kitty,
From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

2301 Autopsies can be morally permitted for legal inquests or scientific research. The free gift of organs after death is legitimate and can be meritorious.

The Church permits cremation, provided that it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body.


#13

[quote=Kitty Chan]I always wonder about stuff like “the ground has to be blessed” or you “cant be cremated” “can donate organs” none of it has to matter because

what if one dies in a industrial accident and burns to death, or dies at sea or in the air or is blown up all nasty yes but it cannot matter about particular cemeteries or blessed ground because of these things.
[/quote]

You can be cremated… as long as you do not spread the ashes. The Church condemned cremation a few hundred years ago not because of cremation itself, but because of the rejection of the ressurection of the dead. If you choose to get cremated and it is not for a reason such as rejection of the ressurection of the dead, you may, but you may not spread your ashes. At least this is how I understand it.


#14

[quote=Semper Fi]You can be cremated… as long as you do not spread the ashes. The Church condemned cremation a few hundred years ago not because of cremation itself, but because of the rejection of the ressurection of the dead. If you choose to get cremated and it is not for a reason such as rejection of the ressurection of the dead, you may, but you may not spread your ashes. At least this is how I understand it.
[/quote]

so cremeted and then the urn is buried or in a columbarium (building) my parents are there or I think you can put in on your shelf at home (personally that would creep me out) although I do have 2 cats on the shelf :rolleyes:

I wonder why you cant spread the ashes, what about sea burial?
I wonder if ashes is a sanitary thing or church. does anyone know?

btw im feeling bettter about cremation more and more because my parents were and i was good with it but this is continued assurance which is comforting. I saw a upseting charsmatic flyer on cremation and it bothered me.

Also regarding my cats does anyone know if I and the hubby are buried can we place the cat urns in with us?? whats it say about that? (casket btw) I know I know what a question :o


#15

[quote=PaulDupre]Kitty,
From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

2301 Autopsies can be morally permitted for legal inquests or scientific research. The free gift of organs after death is legitimate and can be meritorious.

The Church permits cremation, provided that it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body.
[/quote]

Thanks :slight_smile:

First ones good, what is meritorious, a good thing?? for merit?

Second one to be clear Im denying the resurrection by being cremated, right? I dont, but thats what that means??


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