Catholic wearing yarmulke at Jewish wedding


#1

Catholic groom’s father was asked to wear yamaka at reformed Jewish wedding. Is this permissible?


#2

Why wouldn’t it be? It is a sign of respect.


#3

It is permissible.

I, a Catholic man, wore a yarmulke at a Jewish wedding. No problem. It is the custom for men in their temple. It doesn’t mean you’re Jewish, nor does it mean that you deny your faith in Christ (who, it should be noted, was Jewish and followed the Jewish temple customs).

Actually, the groom told me that I would have to get circumcised. I told him that I already was. He said that doesn’t count because it wasn’t performed by a rabbi, so they would have to do it again. He was just kidding, LOL. So, looking at it that way, wearing a yarmulke is not so bad.


#4

Not at all its just showing respect for someone else’s place of worship. I remember visiting a mosque once and you can’t wear shoes in there.

I suppose it could be relatable to back until recent years when girls always wore veils to church . I have no idea why that changed but back then if you went to a Catholic wedding as a woman, even if you weren’t Catholic you would still be expected to wear a veil as respect of the customs of that house of worship.

In retrospect however I did attend a holocaust memorial service at a synagogue last year and I had forgotten to take one of the yammakuhs and no-one said anything. Most of the reform probably really wouldn’t care. It would be different if it was a Haredi service.


#5

Sure. I’ve even worn a kippah in the parish hall of a Catholic church at a seder meal led by a rabbi.


#6

Jewish lady attends TLM Mass with her Catholic friend, is asked to please wear a veil.
Same thing. It’s just about following the respectful custom.


#7

Not an issue of concern.


#8

When in Rome. . .

(Or, in this case, Jerusalem :smiley: )

D


#9

I think the bigger issue would be not wearing it, as it’d be disrespectful, especially considering there’s nothing morally wrong with wearing it.


#10

image


#12

Hey Ken, you might want to take your phone number off your post - just a suggestion.


#13

Yeah, there’s a lot of weirdos on the internet.


#14

How about removing shoes before entering a mosque? Same?


#15

I would say so. 16


#16

It’s not a problem for him to wear one.

There’s another option. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a yarmulka. The point is that a man wears a hat of some kind. If he isn’t comfortable wearing exactly that, he can ask if wearing some other form of hat might be appropriate–such as something to match his tuxedo or suit.


#17

Thanks. That’s another piece of info I didn’t know.

Different though for women, I’m pretty sure.


#18

wow. what a non-issue

you are supposed to respect the traditions of other faiths

good grief


#19

I’m assuming everything is order for the Catholic groom to be married to the Jewish lady? I think you might need a special dispensation (?) For it as it is interfaith marriage, not sure though.
Not to say he wouldn’t know that, but you never know


#21

The Catholic groom having gotten married in a Jewish ceremony was not really married in the eyes of the Catholic church. Didn’t his father’s presence indicate approval? In my opinion that is the real problem here, not wearing a Jewish head covering. Attending a Jewish friend’s wedding is an entirely different situation.


#22

My Catholic niece married a Jewish guy and she got a dispensation, but they were married in a Catholic ceremony and the groom agreed that all their children will be raised in the Catholic faith. She is validly married in the eyes of the Church (the so-called Pauline privilege), however, her marriage was not a sacrament. A sacramental marriage can only occur between two baptized Christians.


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