Catholicfuneral


#1

Can anyone give me an web site that has acomplete funeral wake, mass and committal.I need it for areport on Christian funerals and cant find web site on it


#2

[quote="bill_karweik, post:1, topic:316732"]
Can anyone give me an web site that has acomplete funeral wake, mass and committal.I need it for areport on Christian funerals and cant find web site on it

[/quote]

I don't think the complete set of liturgical prayers for funerals is online. Your best bet would probably be to contact your local parish and see if they would be willing to let you photocopy the pertinent pages from their Missal.


#3

[quote="Joe_5859, post:2, topic:316732"]
I don't think the complete set of liturgical prayers for funerals is online. Your best bet would probably be to contact your local parish and see if they would be willing to let you photocopy the pertinent pages from their Missal.

[/quote]

I would think you could find a virtual missal somewhere?


#4

I remember a day not too long ago when I had to do research for my homework. Like, sit in a library and find something myself. :) But either way, here you go courtesy of letmegooglethatforyou.com:

lmgtfy.com/?q=order+of+christian+funerals+pdf


#5

[quote="bill_karweik, post:1, topic:316732"]
Can anyone give me an web site that has acomplete funeral wake, mass and committal.I need it for areport on Christian funerals and cant find web site on it

[/quote]

google.com


#6

[quote="bill_karweik, post:1, topic:316732"]
Can anyone give me an web site that has acomplete funeral wake, mass and committal.I need it for areport on Christian funerals and cant find web site on it

[/quote]

You should be aware that there is a lot of variation in Catholic funeral protocol. There is a choice of bible readings, music and even the priests vestments- I've seen both black and white vestments. Further , the amount of incense used varies a lot as well.

Sometimes at the cemetery, they'll bring the remains to the grave- other times just to the chapel and they bury the deceased later.


#7

Indeed. Funerals may be white (most popular), purple/violet (at the discretion of the Priest and family - popular among catholics who feel a funeral should be more penitential than suggested by white), or black (Rare, but obligatory for Tridentine Requiem mass. Most parishes no longer have black vestments).


#8

[quote="Ophelia23, post:4, topic:316732"]
I remember a day not too long ago when I had to do research for my homework. Like, sit in a library and find something myself. :) But either way, here you go courtesy of letmegooglethatforyou.com:

lmgtfy.com/?q=order+of+christian+funerals+pdf

[/quote]

I never heard of that website before. Too funny.


#9

[quote="Joe_5859, post:8, topic:316732"]
I never heard of that website before. Too funny.

[/quote]

:D


#10

[quote="Joe_5859, post:8, topic:316732"]
I never heard of that website before. Too funny.

[/quote]

me, too. very funny.

seriously, I think the range of funeral activities varies greatly.

My mom died several months ago. The priest was already commited to a wedding at that exact time, and we had a resident religious sister lead a short prayer service at the funeral home. There were no formalities at the gravesite

My mother's second husband was not in regular communion with the Church. His funeral was in accord with norms before the promulation of the current code of Canon Law. As such, the somewhat crusty, old-style pastor conducted a prayer service in the vestibule of the Church. The body was not permitted to be taken completely inside the church. That was a surprise to me -- I thought I had previously seen everything. this was quite a snub to the deceased.

What I have seen within the last several years, in writing, seems to suggest that the form of a Christian funeral takes depends a lot on local tradition -- like having a marching band, like I guess they have in New Orleans (and maybe in Italy). I think you might have trouble trying to bury a naked body -- but what do I know? And gay funerals are a whole new (to me) chapter of the modern expansion of gay rights.

In Islam, as I have seen at least once, the people have a contempt for the weakness of the human body (which dies), and demonstrate that by ceremoniously dumping the body out of the casket into a purely dirt grave.

If you know a funeral director, they might be a good source of information, especially if they are Catholic.

I would like to be mummified, but the Church would still require burial in the ground, if I'm not mistaken. Yeah, turn me into beef jerky and bury me like King Tut. (no disrespect intended for Mr. Tut.)

Our Catholic Cemetery requires that there be no secular markings on a gravestone (like "Tiger Fan") but must have a religious motif on it. There is one whimsical gravestone, though, where there is a an arrow pointing to the ground, with the notation "I'm over here, Alice"


#11

[quote="sirach2v4, post:10, topic:316732"]

I would like to be mummified, but the Church would still require burial in the ground, if I'm not mistaken. Yeah, turn me into beef jerky and bury me like King Tut. (no disrespect intended for Mr. Tut.)

[/quote]

You are, of course, mistaken on this.

It has always been perfectly acceptable for Catholics to be entombed above ground in a mausoleum and our Catholic cemeteries offer the option here in Pittsburgh. My now deceased grandfather liked the idea of being put in a drawer instead of into the ground- it seemed so much neater to him. And of course, at the local monastery here in Pittsburgh, if I'm not mistaken, the brothers are entombed in the chapel.


closed #12

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