Catholicism vs Protestantism


#1

Hi. I was just wondering what the differences between these two religions were and when I say “differences” I mean differences in history, beliefs, myths, etc. Also, what are some common rituals that occur during a Protestant vigil opposed to a Catholic vigil?


#2

Protestantism began with Martin Luther in 1517. It was a separation of certain Catholics from the Catholic Church. They went on to establish a number of different religions, each with its own beliefs and customs. It’s impossible to identify any specific Protestant belief that would be held by all Protestants, that at the same time would be different from what the Catholic Church also teaches.

Catholicism is the religion that Christ established, with the Apostles in authority over it.

Also, what are some common rituals that occur during a Protestant vigil opposed to a Catholic vigil?

I don’t know anything about a Protestant vigil; I am not aware of any Protestants in my area who make use of such a custom, but in the Catholic Church, a “vigil” refers to any liturgy that is held in the evening, in anticipation of something that is going to happen the next day. For example, the Easter Vigil Mass is the Mass that takes place on Holy Saturday evening, in anticipation of Easter Sunday.

There are also vigil Offices that are prayed in private groups or individually at home that are related to the same idea.

Catholics might also hold a “prayer vigil” while waiting for something important to happen (say, for example, if someone is dying, his relatives and friends would hold a prayer vigil for him, to see if God will heal him, or else until he dies), or to pray for something like the end of abortion or the end of AIDS, etc., over a long period of time. Some types of Protestants might join in with something like these, and also might organize their own, but I don’t know of any specific rituals they would use.


#3

short answer:

The Catholic Church was founded by God on the Rock of Peter.

The tens of thousands of protestant churches were founded by men on men.


#4

The Catholic Church is like the “Whole Pie” that Jesus left behind when he ascended into heaven. Protestantism is like that pie with some pieces cut out of it and discarded. Sometimes something is added to the remainder of the pie that was not there in the first place.


#5

In the Protestant/Episcopal Church the Great Vigil of Easter, when observed, is the first service of Easter Day. It is celebrated at a convenient time between the sunset on Holy Saturday and sunrise on Easter Morning.


#6

If we are to be honest…and that we must…it is also impossible to identify any specific belief that would be held by all Catholics either.

Pointing out an issue with one and ignoring the same issue with another is not the best assessment one can make.


#7

I was referring to the body of official teachings for each denomination of Protestantism.

I suppose that if we were to enumerate the specific belief systems of every individual Protestant or every individual Catholic, or indeed, every person on earth, we would have a different set, unique to each individual, varying according to where they are on their journey of learning (how much of what they are supposed to believe they have actually heard of, yet), how much they understand about their belief system, and how many of the tenets they agree with, of the belief system that they claim to be following, as well as outside influences from other religions that they might mistakingly think are part of their own belief system, as well.

But what I was referring to above is the fact that there is no one set of official Protestant beliefs - it began with at least three - Lutheran, Mennonite, and Calvinist - which have nothing in common with each other that they don’t also have in common with the Catholic faith - and it has proliferated from there.


#8

Doesn’t it really depend upon which template a Protestant will place on a particular page of Scripture, while in Catholicism the faithful defer to the teachings of the authentic magisterium?


#9

to identify any specific belief that would be held by all Catholics either.

Pointing out an issue with one and ignoring the same issue with another is not the best assessment one can make.Bunk…fallacious allegation. Individual screw-ups don’t constitute a fault in Catholic dogma and doctrine, which are the same throughout the world.

for each denomination of Protestantism.

I suppose that if we were to enumerate the specific belief systems of every individual Protestant or every individual Catholic, or indeed, every person on earth, we would have a different set, unique to each individual, varying according to where they are on their journey of learning (how much of what they are supposed to believe they have actually heard of, yet), how much they understand about their belief system, and how many of the tenets they agree with, of the belief system that they claim to be following, as well as outside influences from other religions that they might mistakingly think are part of their own belief system, as well.

But what I was referring to above is the fact that there is no one set of official Protestant beliefs - it began with at least three - Lutheran, Mennonite, and Calvinist - which have nothing in common with each other that they don’t also have in common with the Catholic faith - and it has proliferated from there.A well made point. :thumbsup:

Exactly! Atemi wishes his was a valid allegation. It’s not.

N-Cs will talk about “core beliefs” and yet when you pin them down (if you can) you soon discover that they don’t even agree on what those are. Basically n-C religion is everybody gets a Bible and reads it (if they can read that is) and then it’s every man for himself. Something I see no sign of in the New Testament.

There have always been discussions and debates, but in the end what the church said was final. Modern n-C religions don’t have that.


#10

Firstly, Protestantism in not a religion, but a grouping of over 33,000 different denominations of Christianity, many of which deny any association with the others.

Secondly, although there is no common set of doctrines held by all 33,000+ different Protestant denominations, some even denying the label “Protestant”, they all seem to hold to these three core doctrines:

  1. A 66-book Bible with a shorter version of Daneil and Esther
  2. A “Bible Alone” rule of faith
  3. Justification by “Faith Alone”

Catholics and Orthodox deny the truth of above three tenets of Protestantism.


#11

You see above the viewpoint of Catholic posters as to what the differences are between the Protestant and Catholic faiths. Most, but not all, of their points are well taken. Nonetheless, I would encourage you to review some Protestant or evangelical sources in order to obtain a more balanced view of the pertinent differences between these faiths.


#12

That number may be a bit inflated. However, there are indeed a great many of them.

Secondly, although there is no common set of doctrines held by all 33,000+ different Protestant denominations, some even denying the label “Protestant”, they all seem to hold to these three core doctrines:

  1. A 66-book Bible with a shorter version of Daniel and Esther

Not true of the United Church of Canada, which is currently using the NRSV - Catholic edition. There are also others who are beginning to recognize that the 66-book Bible is not the historically Christian Bible, and are starting to use Catholic Bibles, as well.

  1. A “Bible Alone” rule of faith

Not true of the majority of Protestant denominations, which also cite Christian tradition (by which they mean the first seven ecumenical councils), reason, and personal experience, or some combination thereof.

  1. Justification by “Faith Alone”

Again, not true of all Protestants. The Campbellites (Christian Disciples) for example, recognize that works of obedience are also essential to salvation.


#13

You might also consider the following, from Protestant author J. Leslie Dunstan:

[LEFT]Protestantism is one of the three main divisions of the universal Christian Church, which together with the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches make up one world-wide religion. Protestantism is the most recent of the developments within Christianity, having a relatively short history of slightly more than four centuries; the other two branches of the faith have histories going back to the earliest days of the Christian era. [/LEFT]

[LEFT]Moreover, compared to the unity which characterizes those other branches, Protestantism is divided within itself among hundreds of separate organizations, some of which deny all relationship to others. The many denominations and sects have differing beliefs and carry on a variety of practices, which give them the appearance of being distinct from one another. …[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Protestantism rests firmly upon the belief that God deals directly with man as a person, so that salvation is gained “by faith alone.” This puts the emphasis upon man’s own life as it is lived in relationship to his society and his world. In one sense man becomes the center of his religion. Since men differ from one another, and since circumstances differ from generation to generation and place to place, Protestantism is bound to exist in varied groups. Man, as he is and in his situation, bears a living relationship to God. Therefore, man must express his religious faith in ever-changing forms of thought and action. The dividedness of Protestantism comes about through the very belief upon which it rests.[/LEFT]

[LEFT][J. Leslie Dunstan*, Protestantism

, (George Braziller, 1962), preface][/LEFT]

[LEFT]I realize “Protestantism” has changed greatly since the above text was written…its just so hard to keep up with the “ever-changing” forms of thought and action.:wink: [/LEFT]


#14

If we are to be honest…and that we must…it is also impossible to identify any specific belief that would be held by all Catholics either.

Bunk…fallacious allegation. Individual screw-ups don’t constitute a fault in Catholic dogma and doctrine, which are the same throughout the world.

Did I mention any dogmas or doctrines?

No.

What I said it reality. The truth.

It is surely no “allegation.”

We are not dealing in theories or what things should look like on paper. We are talking about what is.


#15

.

It is surely no “allegation.”

We are not dealing in theories or what things should look like on paper. We are talking about what is.

…What is is what the Catholic Church teaches and not what someone like you or some dissenter might wish it to be.

You made a fallacious statement and now you want to try to justify your remarks when I call you on it.

Few n-C denoms have a catechism, or even a statement of faith that all their churches hold to. That is not the case with Catholic Churches. Regardless of individuals along the way. The Catholic faith is consistent, and all the propagandizing to the contrary cannot change that.

Do you really enjoy beating up those straw men? You have opinions that you come here and attempt to express as facts without substantiation (you do it all the time), just because you wish something is so doesn’t bring it to pass.

Catholic Dogma is not theoretical, though you wish it was.


#16

It’s possible that you have changed the subject without my realizing it, but in the post that you were originally responding to, which was mine, I was referring to the official teachings of each body.

Catholics have only one set of official teachings.

Protestants have as many sets of official teachings as there are denominations - which is an unknown number.

This is unrelated to the fact that individual persons have an imperfect grasp of the teachings they claim to believe in, and may, in some cases, even not feel bound to believe them at all.

This phenomenon occurs everywhere.


#17

Hi,
As you can see we are already fighting.:o

May I suggest get the info. you want on catholocism here and then go to crosswalks.com and ask them what non-catholics believe and then compare for yourself.:thumbsup:
All you are going to get on this thread is each side defending itself:rolleyes:


#18

Well said.

:clapping:


#19

I apologize, but you were not clear. You said:

“It’s impossible to identify any specific Protestant belief that would be held by all Protestants”

All Protestants are all Protestants.

That is correct, BTW…as is my statement.

Catholics have only one set of official teachings.

As do all churches.

This is not peculiar to Roman Catholicism

Protestants have as many sets of official teachings as there are denominations - which is an unknown number.

And Roman Catholicism is just another denomination in Christendom as well, though I am aware that you would like to insist otherwise.

Lutherans have their official teachings, as does the RCC, as do the Orthodox, as do the Trads, as do the Anglicans, as do the Coptics, as do the Baptists, as do the Methodists, as does Calvary Chapel, as do the autocephalous Catholic churches, etc…, etc…


#20

The Catholic Church is not a denomination. There were no denominations prior to the Reformation. The Catholic Church existed prior to the Reformation and, therefore, does not fall into the category of a denomination.


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