Catholics accepting the good in protestantism

Hi,

I would like to discuss with you all how we as the Catholic Church can accept what is good and true from protestant traditions.

After all, they are truly baptized christians and also, because of that, they have received the Holy Spirit. Of course, all of this comes from the Catholic Church: all the good that we find in other communities.

:wink:

I am really impressed in seeing this thread. But am not hopeful this thread will become anything more than SOME catholics saying there is nothing good that comes from protestants. And those catholics are often the loudest… Maybe I have been on this forum too long and there are some very loud anti-protestants on here but I am just losing hope faster and faster. I have met some WONDERFUL catholics on this board too, but it seems (more and more) that they are the minority. *sigh…

Hopefully I will be proven wrong… :blush:

And threfore, you are already aware of what we as noncatholics find good and true in the CC. Speaking as a Lutheran, it is a blessing that we share so very much in common, much of it coming from our common history prior to 1517.

I pray we can build on what we share as common truth, and earnestly and with charity discuss what we disagree on, allowing the Holy Spirit to guide us back to unity.

Jon

We need more people who can see the good in others, especially in other christians! The Body of Christ wouldn’t be the same without … well, the Body of Christ!

Everything good in protestantism came from the Catholic Church. Yes, there is good in their faith, there is truth in their faith…and that truth comes from the Church. What is there to discuss?

Thanks Jon, I am impressed to see that you are here at CAF.

I am glad that we can at least both agree that Jesus Christ is Lord!

I thank God for the good christians in the world, and you seem to be one of them.

One good thing that I like is the 2-year youth missionary work found in LDS.

If Catholics were required to do this it would be wonderful.

Huh? :confused: Catholics and Catholic youth do more missionary work in the world than any other organization out there.

Furthermore, it is ‘other’ non-Catholic Christians who won’t accept the Catholics. This thread should be turned around.

If Catholics are accepting the good in protestantism, then those catholics are an abomination alongside the protestants IMHO.

KJV: Proverbs 20:10 Divers weights, and divers measures, both of them are alike abomination to the LORD.

NAB: 10 Varying weights, varying measures, are both an abomination to the LORD.

Protestantism has interpreted the bible with varying weights and with varying measures. Take it for what it is worth.

Nice thread. Is there anything else specific we protestants do that you also like, anything we might do that you don’t do? I hope that makes sense. Again, thanks for the thread.

Being raised Catholic in the Bible Belt I had to learn early on that although we differ in our belief practices, we all have one thing in common our love for God and each other.
I have seen good in many of them. Many are very family orientated, Many of them help others in need, no matter what church they belong too.
When my husband was seriously injured back in the early 90’s, my neighbor and good friend’s the local Baptist Church, came to my aid without question. They came in and helped with my children (I had 5 little children at that time ages 2-13), of course, they talked of their church and left phamlets around but no one presurred me to join. Only one felt “uncomfortable” around my Mary table, as she called it.:wink: she never came back.

Although I will never join their church, but I will be forever grateful for my Baptist friends. :slight_smile:

I’ll tell you one thing that Protestants do better than Catholics (generally speaking).

Welcoming outsiders/visitors into their churches.

When I came into the Church, I ‘parish hopped’ for over a year. I was **never **welcomed, spoken to, or greeted by anyone in all those different churches. If I hadn’t been 100% convinced of the necessity of me being Catholic, I’d never have come back.

OTOH, nearly **every **protestant church I’ve ever been to has had someone welcome me, ask me my name, talk to me, etc. I felt invited, loved, and welcomed. (One Episcopal parish I visited presented me with a gift bag full of handmade and homemade gifts… of course, that was Southern Hospitality as well as Christian, but it was touching!) While that’s not enough to base a decision on whether or not to be Lutheran vs Anglican vs Catholic, etc, it sure as heck makes us Catholics look like we don’t know what Christian Hospitality looks like! :rolleyes:

(by the way, hospitality is one of the MAJOR themes in scripture. Something we Catholics don’t do well and ought to work on!)

My Parish does greet at the door. It’s just always done.:thumbsup:

Now when my daughter married and moved to the northeast and although there is many Catholic Churches, she has yet to see that Southern hospitality she grew up with. No one greets you, no one says Hello:( I know it is not required and many will say it is Mass not a social club but you are right hospitaly is a major theme in Scripture.

Huh???:confused: Well, I’m sorry but you’re mistaken. I’m Lutheran and married to a Roman Catholic. Her entire family is RC and I love every one of them. Protestants and Catholics are both “Christian”, even though we differ in doctrine and practice.
I accept the Catholics, and hope that both the Catholics and Protestants can find unity, b/c we are all a part of the body of Christ. :thumbsup:

Very well put. I hope many of those on here who are protestant and catholic detractors can adopt this sort of attitude.

I LOVE protestants and have an especially warm part of my heart for the evangelical sort of the variety I knew so well in college (Navigators, Intervarsity, Campus Crusade for Christ…).

There is no question that the vast bulk of these folks love Christ, desire to do His will, earnestly read the Scriptures and believe they have understood Jesus’ intent for ‘church’ correctly. Some of them accomplish amazing feats of faith considering they have limited themselves to just one or two of the sacraments!

Unfortunately, zeal and enthusiasm have limited staying power. The Navs I knew in school recognized this well and focused HARD on developing a disciplined prayer life while the ‘high’ lasted. I wish I could have those times back now. I’d be so much more able to share the value of the sacraments of the eucharist and reconciliation with catholics who jumped ship for abbreviated christianity! I really have no beef with protestants, the PEOPLE. It’s the THEOLOGY I find so tragic. :frowning:

I am the only Catholic in my family. My wife and 5 adult children and grandchildren are non Catholics but most are Christian of one stripe or another. To say that this situation is bad to the point that it is worse than not being Christian at all??? Poppycock… It is a foothold just like the one I had when I converted. I would rather have a car that is not hitting on all cylinders than be a pedestrian yet, I don’t want a car that is broken beyond repair.:shrug:

wow thanks be to God for all the good posts here!

I am impressed to see the good heartedness and the kindness of catholics and christians towrds each other. I think tht this is a sign for hope that one day, all might be fully one.

Praise Jesus for that!

and btw, keep the good comments coming! I know that the Lord is pleased when we see the good in others. I know that the devil is probably furious though.

Praise Jesus Christ our Lord.

:thumbsup:

I really do agree that if young catholics did missionary work like this particular way, there would be some good fruit. I wonder if any catholic groups actually do this specifc kind of ministry?

I love praise and worship contemporary music, but maybe that is just me. I used to go to a non-denom evangelical for a year before I returned to the catholic Church and yeah, I was brought to tears many times during P&W there.

Thank you!

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