Catholics and Muslims


#1

Why do people seem to not like Muslims?


#2

[quote="Godislove4ever, post:1, topic:273993"]
Why do people seem to not like Muslims?

[/quote]

See here for a fairly recent thread on a similar question.


#3

I think most people on here don't dislike muslims. In fact, as catholics, I hope we all LOVE muslims the same way that Jesus loves each of us.

I personally don't agree with the Muslim beliefs that differ from the belief's of Christ's one true church (such as the belief that Christ, Himself, is not the risen Lord). I would argue that I perhaps even hate these beliefs since they are putting the spiritual salvaging of a 1,000,000,000+ muslims at risk.


#4

I cannot understand why people in general seem toi have a problem with Muslims.


#5

[quote="Kouyate42, post:4, topic:273993"]
I cannot understand why people in general seem toi have a problem with Muslims.

[/quote]

Or Nazis. I mean, there were plenty of peaceful Nazis who didn't ever kill anyone. Just because the entire system of Nazism was led by a guy who wanted to kill all Jews and openly declared one can be a Nazi or a Christian, but not both, I just don't get it.

It ain't the people who don't know any better or even are totally peaceful in and of themselves. It's the system and those who embrace it in the totality of what the system espouses.

History dictates that.


#6

I do not dislike Muslims but I certainly do dislike their beliefs. In my opinion, they are deceived as far as religion goes and I hope and pray that the Holy Spirit leads them to the fullness of the Truth as is only found in the Catholic Church. I want the best for our Muslim brothers and sisters in humanity.


#7

jonbhorton;
Or Nazis.

Or Americans, they seem to send troops into so many countries, how many dead from American intervention? [FONT=Tahoma]Americans are fine. [/FONT]

[FONT=Tahoma][FONT=Tahoma][FONT=Arial]It's the system and those who embrace it in the totality of what the system espouses.

[/FONT]
[/FONT]

Agreed[/FONT]


#8

Loving someone and liking them are not the same things.

We are obliged to love Muslims. Loving is wanting and seeking their proper good.

"Liking" is an emotional response to another, based on characteristics which we either favor or do not favor. We are not obliged to "like" anybody, Muslims included.

A better expression might be that many Catholics do not like the characteristics they frequently see with individual Muslims or Muslim groups. You can't be aware of the world at all and not know that in a significant portion of the Muslim world, these characteristics are common.
-Intolerance. Particularly of other religions.
-Cruelty, particularly toward women and "infidels".
-Murderousness
-Primitiveness

Very unattractive attributes.

Much of that has nothing to do with their religion per se, but are cultural accretions, accretions that their particular religion does have some role in maintaining, even exacerbating, with the sole exception of primitiveness. Let's face it, much of the Muslim world is primitive, really primitive, and that colors much of what people in the west think about Muslims generally.


#9

I work with a lot of Muslims. I will tell you they are very good people. The problem is, we only see the radicals.

I am reading the Koran to better understand. I have been surprised so far to see so many references to Jesus, Mother Mary, Adam, Moses, etc.

I read on a website that an old scroll that dates around the time of the Apostles stated that another prophet would come after Jesus and would be named mohammed. Not sure if it is true, but if so, it would be pretty interesting.

For me, Jesus was more than a prophet, but I think understanding Muslims is key.


#10

[quote="TexanKnight, post:9, topic:273993"]
I work with a lot of Muslims. I will tell you they are very good people. The problem is, we only see the radicals.

I am reading the Koran to better understand. I have been surprised so far to see so many references to Jesus, Mother Mary, Adam, Moses, etc.

I read on a website that an old scroll that dates around the time of the Apostles stated that another prophet would come after Jesus and would be named mohammed. Not sure if it is true, but if so, it would be pretty interesting.

For me, Jesus was more than a prophet, but I think understanding Muslims is key.

[/quote]

Belloc classifies it as a heresy for the reason of the outright stealing/twisting of such basic character profiles and names. The actual display of the names and associated characters is outright false and often times not chronological.

For the umpteenth billion time:

Gnosticism, Arianism, Nestorianism can all be found in the "Christian" portions, i.e. those portions which mention anything relating to Christ.

The "OT" portions are so wacked out and historically stupid that it's all but obvious, if not outright.

The eschatological portions mimic a mirror-negative of Christian eschatology. In other words, their version of the savior, Al-Mahdi, mimics the anti-Christ whereas "Isa"(man-boy-retard version of Jesus) mimics the false prophet. I'm not saying that mohammedanism IS the end-times "religion"/political system, just saying.

Gnostic scrolls and/or not-the-Gospel "gospel" about a new prophet to come is by definition anti-Christ.

Sheesh, it's like people reading a transcript to a Satanic Black Mass and saying, "Well, it's all in reverse, but it says Jesus in it and they consecrate the Host!".

Yeah, that's true; it's also Satanic.


#11

[quote="jonbhorton, post:10, topic:273993"]
Belloc classifies it as a heresy for the reason of the outright stealing/twisting of such basic character profiles and names. The actual display of the names and associated characters is outright false and often times not chronological.

For the umpteenth billion time:

Gnosticism, Arianism, Nestorianism can all be found in the "Christian" portions, i.e. those portions which mention anything relating to Christ.

The "OT" portions are so wacked out and historically stupid that it's all but obvious, if not outright.

The eschatological portions mimic a mirror-negative of Christian eschatology. In other words, their version of the savior, Al-Mahdi, mimics the anti-Christ whereas "Isa"(man-boy-retard version of Jesus) mimics the false prophet. I'm not saying that mohammedanism IS the end-times "religion"/political system, just saying.

Gnostic scrolls and/or not-the-Gospel "gospel" about a new prophet to come is by definition anti-Christ.

Sheesh, it's like people reading a transcript to a Satanic Black Mass and saying, "Well, it's all in reverse, but it says Jesus in it and they consecrate the Host!".

Yeah, that's true; it's also Satanic.

[/quote]

Not saying its true. I am saying it is interesting. Did you miss that? I think it is interesting that their main area in Mecca has a little building allegedly built by Abraham....I love learning new stuff.....not afraid of it


#12

[quote="TexanKnight, post:11, topic:273993"]
I think it is interesting that their main area in Mecca has a little building allegedly built by Abraham.

[/quote]

I'm guessing that would probably be news to Abraham. ;)


#13

[quote="Mickey, post:12, topic:273993"]
I'm guessing that would probably be news to Abraham. ;)

[/quote]

It is said in Judaism and Christianity, that God commanded Abraham to sacrifice his son in the region of Mount Moriah. It is also said that God commanded Solomon to build the Temple Mount on Mount Moriah, this is a huge structure, a small part of it is what we know as the Wailing Wall, or Western Wall. On top of the Temple Mount, God commanded Solomon to build a Temple, that will house ‘The Ark of the Covenant’ better known for the Ten Commandments. Jesus prayed on the Temple Mount, and when he healed people he sent them to the Temple to give thanks.

The prophet pbuh ascended to heaven to meet all the other prophets, on this same site, associated with Abraham, Moses, Solomon, and Jesus.
[FONT=Verdana]‘The Dome of the Rock Mosque, and the Al Aqsa sacred to Islam stand on the Temple Mount. As you queue up to go up to the mosque from the Jewish side, there is a sign that says – God is always present here.[/FONT]

It seems that God has brought all three religions together in so many ways, and it seems to be a place to search for God rather than religion.


#14

[quote="Eric_Hyom, post:13, topic:273993"]
It is said in Judaism and Christianity, that God commanded Abraham to sacrifice his son in the region of Mount Moriah. It is also said that God commanded Solomon to build the Temple Mount on Mount Moriah, this is a huge structure, a small part of it is what we know as the Wailing Wall, or Western Wall. On top of the Temple Mount, God commanded Solomon to build a Temple, that will house ‘The Ark of the Covenant’ better known for the Ten Commandments. Jesus prayed on the Temple Mount, and when he healed people he sent them to the Temple to give thanks.

The prophet pbuh ascended to heaven to meet all the other prophets, on this same site, associated with Abraham, Moses, Solomon, and Jesus.
[FONT=Verdana]‘The Dome of the Rock Mosque, and the Al Aqsa sacred to Islam stand on the Temple Mount. As you queue up to go up to the mosque from the Jewish side, there is a sign that says – God is always present here.[/FONT]What ascension do you mean? Do you mean the one that happened on the same night that Ayesha his wife said essentially, "This guy was here with me, asleep, all night"...What ascension do you mean, exactly?

It seems that God has brought all three religions together in so many ways, and it seems to be a place to search for God rather than religion.

[/quote]


#15

[quote="Eric_Hyom, post:13, topic:273993"]
It is said in Judaism and Christianity, that God commanded Abraham to sacrifice his son in the region of Mount Moriah. It is also said that God commanded Solomon to build the Temple Mount on Mount Moriah, this is a huge structure, a small part of it is what we know as the Wailing Wall, or Western Wall. On top of the Temple Mount, God commanded Solomon to build a Temple, that will house ‘The Ark of the Covenant’ better known for the Ten Commandments. Jesus prayed on the Temple Mount, and when he healed people he sent them to the Temple to give thanks.

The prophet pbuh ascended to heaven to meet all the other prophets, on this same site, associated with Abraham, Moses, Solomon, and Jesus.
[FONT=Verdana]‘The Dome of the Rock Mosque, and the Al Aqsa sacred to Islam stand on the Temple Mount. As you queue up to go up to the mosque from the Jewish side, there is a sign that says – God is always present here.[/FONT]

It seems that God has brought all three religions together in so many ways, and it seems to be a place to search for God rather than religion.

[/quote]

Which ascension do you mean? Didn't Mohammed's wife Ayesha say about the night of the supposed ascension, essentially, "This guy was with me, asleep in our bed all night!"...Is that the ascension you mean?


#16

[quote="Mickey, post:12, topic:273993"]
I'm guessing that would probably be news to Abraham. ;)

[/quote]

As to Ishmael ;)


#17

[quote="Godislove4ever, post:1, topic:273993"]
Why do people seem to not like Muslims?

[/quote]

Its not a question of likes and dislikes. Its a question of good and evil, half-truths and truth.

Its what the West perceives as Truth as opposed to Reality.


#18

[quote="Godislove4ever, post:1, topic:273993"]
Why do people seem to not like Muslims?

[/quote]

It's down to what they are taught about them, or exposed to, I should say, since we have a choice on how we feel about others.


#19

[quote="Godislove4ever, post:1, topic:273993"]
Why do people seem to not like Muslims?

[/quote]

There seem to be a lot of people who lump all Muslims in with the terrorists. Doesn't make sense, but logic isn't always humanity's strong suit.


#20

[quote="Eric_Hyom, post:13, topic:273993"]
The prophet pbuh ascended to heaven to meet all the other prophets, on this same site, associated with Abraham, Moses, Solomon, and Jesus.

[/quote]

And you know this......how?

[quote="Eric_Hyom, post:13, topic:273993"]
‘The Dome of the Rock Mosque, and the Al Aqsa sacred to Islam stand on the Temple Mount. As you queue up to go up to the mosque from the Jewish side, there is a sign that says – God is always present here..

[/quote]

I thought there was a black rock that they venerated there.

[quote="Eric_Hyom, post:13, topic:273993"]
it seems to be a place to search for God rather than religion.

[/quote]

I'm not sure what you mean here....but it does not sound good.

Islam is a self-evident outgrowth not of the Old and New Covenants but of the darkness of heathen Araby. Beside ludicrous historical suggestions to the contrary (such as the idea that the *Ka'bah *was built by Abraham, which would have been big news to him), Muslim apologists have strained to find in the Bible evidence that a new prophet would arise *after *Jesus, seeing Muhammad in obvious prophecies of the Holy Spirit (that were fulfilled on Pentecost) or of the Second Coming of Christ. One could find no better refutation of Islam's efforts to appropriate Christian Scriptures (here, Matthew 24:27) than that of the 14th-century Byzantine saint, Gregory Palamas, to his Turkish captors:
"It is true that Muhammad started from the east and came to the west, as the sun travels from east to west. Nevertheless he came with war, knives, pillaging, forced enslavement, murders, and acts that are not from the good God but instigated by the chief manslayer, the devil."
orthodoxinfo.com/general/muslimadvance.aspx


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