Catholics Christian?

I recently converted and I get some people implying that Catholics aren’t Christians,someone please explain.

Roman Catholicism is the largest “denomination” of Christianity. some protestants strongly disagree with several Catholic doctrines. because of their disagreement they do not consider Catholics to be Christian. They usually do not believe that Catholics are “saved.”

I believe this to be false. Catholicism IS a form of Christianity. It IS the Church that Christ founded on Earth. The similarities between us vastly outnumber the differences. most importantly we both value the Holy Bible.[BIBLEDRB][/BIBLEDRB]

Amen!!

Its part of a Protestant ploy to make it a game of “us and them”. Protestants call themselves ‘Christian’ and Roman Catholics “Catholics”, so as to promote a false sense of unity among themselves, when in reality there are thousands of Protestant religions popping up like weeds around the world.

The problem it is that there’s not enough weed killer.

Seriously…

Catholics are “pre-denominational Christians,” members of the Church founded by Jesus Christ.

AMDG
jsa

It’s just ignorance. In the last 50 or so years many churches have popped up with the name “Christian” of “Christianity” in them, they’re all over the place. But Catholic churches don’t use that label, thus some people don’t see it on the sign and think we are something different than followers of Christ.

If they only realized the same Bishop who called the church Catholic was the same one who’s church began calling us all Christians, they would see the folly of their position. Nothing to get too excited over, just fill them in and make them smarter Christians.

I don’t think I would call them weeds, that might be a bit to harsh ( that is a term that should be reserved for those as vicious and hateful as Jack Chick) instead we should pray for our brothers and sisters that the Holy Spirit may guide them. I do believe in Vatican II when it says that there can be salvation outside of the Church (probably not so much outside of Christianity) and I believe that we as Catholics can learn alot from our seperated brothers and sisters but they can also have alot to learn from us.

those that do not call us Christians forget how many doctrines they have inherited from us. and had it not been for the RCC they themselves would not have Christ

I’d beg to differ, Catholicism is THE form of Christianity :thumbsup:

And I have read a number of Catholics on CAF deny the Christianity of Protestants. The fact is in both instances the accusation is unchristian to its core. It is a charge rejected by the Catholic Catechism, and by my synod (LCMS).

Jon

Jon - which “Protestants” are you talking about? LDS (Mormons), Seventh Day Adventists and Jehovah Witnesses are not Christians because they do not believe in the Triune God which it is my understanding you do as an LCMS. There are some other splinter groups from mainline Protestantism that are questionable as well just like there are individual Catholics and LCMS who do not exhibit their Christianity and thus give others the impression that the entire churches are not.

To answer the OP, Catholics are the first Christians. Like others have pointed out some of the newer Christian Denominations are the one tending to claim that Catholics are not Christians and as such some of us in conversing with them will say “I am a Catholic Christian.”

Brenda V.

Hi Brenda,
When I speak of Protestants, I speak of Western noncatholics who believe, teach and confess the Trinity. Those that do not meet that criteria, which your communion and mine agree on, I would not consider Protestant. And your expression regarding individuals is spot on.

To answer the OP, Catholics are the first Christians. Like others have pointed out some of the newer Christian Denominations are the one tending to claim that Catholics are not Christians and as such some of us in conversing with them will say “I am a Catholic Christian.”

I would contend that “Catholic Christian”, like “Lutheran Christian”, is both more specific and redundant. If you say you are Catholic, I know you are Christian. :wink:

Jon

Because people are very poorly educated in the realm of faith these days. I know this girl who was once asked if she was Christian, she then replied, “I’m not Christian, I’m Roman Catholic.” It’s because of people like this that give Catholics a bad name . . . it’s fairly disturbing how little some people know of the subject of their faith. And that’s not limited to Catholics either, lots of my friends are Protestant and didn’t understand that there are denominations in Christianity. It really is frightening.

To be Catholic** is to be a** Christian, Until the rise in anti-catholic teachings in the last few decades, one would never question such a thing. It goes along with the same nonsense of us being taught a different Gospel or if we believe in Jesus or not:shrug:

We are the original:thumbsup:

Protestants broke away from us and use our writing (Bible, Church Fathers) and says we are not Christians? We called ourselves Christians before they even exist. Generally anyone with a valid baptism is a Christian, they can have doctrines that can amount to apostasy. Many Protestants saying Catholics are not Christians generally do not know a lot about Catholics unless it was told to them by an ignorant fellow anticatholic.

One doctrine some of the ‘reformers’ espoused, like Calvin, was the belief Christ literally became sin, became separated from the Father and subsequently was punished in Hell How can a doctrine that there was a split in the trinity Christian?

In regards to the LCMS, I don’t understand how the could regard us as Christians since the Missouri Synod formally believes the Papacy is the antiChrist (since 1932), ergo all Catholics obedient to the Pope would be following the antichrist

=BerhaneSelassie;5941583]Protestants broke away from us and use our writing (Bible, Church Fathers)

They are the shared writings of the Church Militant, east and west.

Generally anyone with a valid baptism is a Christian, they can have doctrines that can amount to apostasy. Many Protestants saying Catholics are not Christians generally do not know a lot about Catholics unless it was told to them by an ignorant fellow anticatholic.

I agree, but wouldn’t holding apostate doctrines amount to being anti-Christ?

In regards to the LCMS, I don’t understand how the could regard us as Christians since the Missouri Synod formally believes the Papacy is the antiChrist (since 1932), ergo all Catholics obedient to the Pope would be following the antichrist

Not since 1932. The Lutheran Confessions (Power and Primacy of the Pope) uses the term in relation to the papacy. That said, the Catholic Church believes that some of our teachings are heretical. So, sadly, we have mutual condemnations. And the language of each, to our modern ear, is offensive. I, frankly, hope it remains offensive to our charity, urging us with the help of the Holy Spirit to overcome our differences.
So, when the Confessions make this claim, it is saying no more than the Catholic Church is teaching errors that are not of Christ (anti-Christ). We are not saying that the Pope is some kind of end-times beast. In fact, I believe the Pope John Paul II is the greatest Christian leader of my lifetime.
As you said about the Catholic Church recognizing Lutherans as Christians, even though we have, from your perspective, errors in mixed with truth, so too we believe the same about the Catholic Church, and that does not exclude her members from being brothers and sisters in Christ, receiving salvation granting grace from her word and sacraments.

From the LCMS website

Q. A non-Lutheran Christian friend of mine recently stated that he believes that Catholics are not saved and should not be considered Christians. What is the Synod’s belief regarding the salvation of Catholics who adhere to Roman dogma?

A. The LCMS recognizes all Trinitarian church bodies as Christian churches (in contrast to “cults,” which typically reject the doctrine of the Trinity and thus cannot be recognized as Christian). In fact, a primary “objective” listed in the Synod’s Constitution (Article III) is to “work through its official structure toward fellowship with other Christian church bodies”—which explicitly assumes that these “other church bodies” are “Christian” in nature. That does not lessen the Synod’s concern for the false doctrine taught and confessed by these churches, but it does highlight the Synod’s recognition that wherever the “marks of the church” (the Gospel and Sacraments) are present—even where “mixed” with error—there the Christian church is present. Such a church is a heterodox church, that is, a church that teaches false doctrine.

Of course, personal salvation is not merely a matter of external membership in or association with any church organization or denomination (including the LCMS), but comes through faith in Jesus Christ alone. All those who confess Jesus Christ as Savior are recognized as “Christians” by the Synod—only God can look into a person’s heart and see whether that person really believes. It is possible to have true and sincere faith in Jesus Christ even while having wrong or incomplete beliefs about other doctrinal issues.

This explains why former Synod President A.L. Barry called members of the Roman Catholic Church “our fellow Christians” in his statement “Toward True Reconciliation,” which at the same time identifies and laments the false teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

The great danger is that believing things contrary to God’s Word can obscure and perhaps even completely destroy belief in Jesus Christ as one’s Savior. We pray that this will not happen to those who confess Jesus Christ as Savior and yet belong to heterodox church bodies, including fellow Christians in the Roman Catholic Church.

I hope that helps you understand our belief,

Jon

Protestant (protesting) Christians and Catholic (universal) Christians.

:thumbsup:

Jon,

To both of our ears and knowledge it is redundant to say “Catholic Christian” or “Lutheran Christian” but for some people it is necessary. I don’t use the term with everyone but I have some acquaintances who have questioned my Christianity when I tell them I am Catholic or some who have asked “is that Christian?” Sometimes I can tell that is how they feel when talking to them about religion before I even mention my Faith so I just cut to the chase and say “I am a Catholic Christian”.

So depending on who I am talking to, if the subject of religion comes up, I tell them either I am Catholic or I am a Catholic Christian.

Brenda V.

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