Catholics, how would you refute this?

“The best men of the best epochs are simply those who make the fewest blunders and commit the fewest sins.” - Thomas Huxley

We all know that there is always room for God’s forgiveness, but it seems like there are some people who still spend years feeling sorry for even one small misdeed which now they consider very shameful in the present time.

Mkdl:

Refuting that is unnecessary. Such people are enroute to Sainthood!

God bless,
jd

J.D., I supremely agree with your statement, because, in my opinion, those people fully understand both the capacities of their own mortal selves and God’s plans for them sooner than us. There is no reason for us to be jealous of them, not because they are seeking personal glory, but rather doing great service to the Christian community whoever and wherever they are in their times. I think despite how many blunders some of those saints may have made because of their own weaknesses and misunderstandings, they are able to get over those shortcomings and choose to devote their lives to serving Christ to a mighty extent.

Mkdl:

Agreed. I also think that such inconveniences can be a “thorn in the behind,” that is, an impetus to remaining focused, all the way through, on achieving unity with the Beatific Vision after death. :thumbsup:

God bless,
jd

Saints believe they are sinners, and sinners believe they are saints.

“The best men of the best epochs are simply those who make the fewest blunders and commit the fewest sins.” - Thomas Huxley

What does Huxley mean by best?

Is he talking about saintliness, or about good accomplishments?

President Truman said that General George C. Marshall, the Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff during WWII, and therefore the commander of all the Allied military forces, was “the greatest of the great of our time”.
Marshall’s work was little known to the public, but there’s no doubt he was a great man. He steered the United States through WWII, and the early years of the Cold War. The Presidents mostly followed his recommendations.

forgiveness isn’t forgetfullness. The introspective life is full of embarassment.

Is not (S)ainthood a universally sanctioned acknowledgement that a person is a saint? Isn’t any good person destined for sainthood? If so, then the author quoted is speaking like someone who needs fame to satisfy his sense of recognition. It sounds like he laments the Sainthood of the saints, attributing their Sainthood to the mere good luck of having no blunders and few occasions to sin. Since we refute luck as against free will, the true Catholic view is not in line with Huxely’s.

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