Catholics only: Where will you go when you die? Heaven, hell or purgatory?

I’m pretty sure I know the answer to this question. I have never met a Catholic who will say that he is certain he is going to heaven. If he did, he would commit the sin of “presumption” and thereby assure that he did not go straight to heaven. Lol!

So, you’re not going to find any knowledgeable Catholic, short of one who has a personal revelation from God, to say that he knows he is going straight to heaven.

Most Catholics will answer that they hope to go to straight to heaven, but they expect to go to purgatory first. I’d say, without exaggerating, that 99.9% of Catholics will answer this way. For good theological reasons.I

But, I have met Catholics who say that they are certain they won’t even make it to purgatory but will go directly to hell. Of course, they are also committing a sin. It is the sin of despairing of God. So, they are kind of of assuring that they won’t straight to heaven with that attitude.

Now, I want to change horses and consider this statement by Jesus Christ:

Matt 7:13
Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat:

I have heard Catholic professors (which shall go unnamed), say that this strait (or narrow) road, refers to the hell of the damned.

Who is right? The Catholic professors? or the Catholic faithful?

I say it is the Catholic faithful.

Consider this. The majority of the Jews did not get in through the narrow gate. The majority of the Jews got in through the wide gate. They went to Limbo, which in my opinion is another name for Purgatory.

As far as we know, the only Jews who made it directly to heaven are Enoch, Elijah, and Moses. They are explicitly mentioned in Scripture. We can make a case that all the Prophets also went. But that is still a tiny minority. Scripture says:

Romans 11
7 What then? Israel hath not obtained that which he seeketh for; but the election hath obtained it, and the rest were blinded.

When it comes to the Jews, they got in through the wide gate. Enoch, Elijah and Moses. Other than that, the others are presumed to have remained in the Limbo of the Fathers until Jesus let them in.

Heb 11
39 And these all, having obtained a good report through faith, received not the promise:

40 God having provided some better thing for us, that they without us should not be made perfect.

Consider also that faith does not contradict reason.

I mentioned faith and reason because in school, we are taught that most things fall in a happy medium. It is called a bell curve. If we apply that to salvation, most people are neither evil nor holy. They fall right in the middle. These people, in my opinion are going to wind up in the Christian Limbo. The one we more commonly refer to as Purgatory.

A small minority will go directly to hell because they have no redeemable qualities and have willfully turned away from God and persisted in that condition to the end.

Another small minority will go directly to heaven. They are the Saints. Both the Canonized which are recognized by the Church and those who live anonymously holy lives whom only God knows about in this life.

Therefore, I believe that most people are going to end up in Purgatory and then going to heaven. That is Catholic Doctrine. And a small minority will bypass Purgatory and go straight to heaven.

And another minority will wind up in the Lake of Fire for all eternity.

This, I believe, is confirmed by the sense of the faithful. The Holy Spirit has led the Catholic faithful to arrive at this conclusion. But we’ll see how this poll goes. Maybe I’m totally wrong.

Sincerely,

De Maria

I think when it says the wide gate is the road to destruction that it simply means that it is easy to end up in Hell and not so easy, or even hard, to get into Heaven because of the many temptations that come up which tempt us to sin, sometimes mortal sin.

That said, I hope to make it to Heaven someday but I expect to spend some time in Purgatory first. Hopefully I can gain a plenary indulgence right before I die and then go straight to Heaven. I would not presume to say that this will happen though because I know I am a sinful person and I do regretfully fall to temptation often. However, I do have a strong hope of making it to Heaven someday.

Given my past life? I will literally be jumping for joy and doing cartwheels if God says I’m going to Purgatory :smiley:

Well technically, if you believe some of the more hardcore Catholics on here, the vast majority will go straight to Hell for dying in mortal sin. That’s what I have trouble agreeing with… Someone can be a great Christian (say, a Protestant) but dies in a state of mortal sin. Is he eternally condemned? It doesn’t seem right to me…

This is a contradiction. You can’t be a great anything and be in mortal sin. Mortal sin is called a mortal sin because you’ve killed the soul in some way through the obstinate rejection of God in place of something else.

We don’t know who dies in mortal sin, but 100% of people who die in mortal sin go to Hell. If they didn’t, then it wouldn’t be called mortal sin.

If a person was a Protestant who committed one mortal sin in their life, was truly sorry and prayed to God every day for forgiveness, but never went to confession… Who are we to say for certain where their soul will end up? I believe in God being merciful and loving.

Pax Christi.

What a Friday night topic! I’m going to go back to watching scary movies.

God save us.

Heaven or purgatory? Well, if you go to Purgatory you end up in heaven, so I’ll be happy either way.

I hope I will eventually get to Heaven but I know for certain I will be spending some time in Purgatory.

:heaven:

Unrepented mortal sin is what separates us from God.

BTW confession is for Catholics only, Protestants are not allowed to receive absolution. Absolution is a juridical act of the Church necessary for Catholics to be in full communion with her.

Shifts of opinion among the faithful may not necessarily be rooted in a better development of theology, but simply by a change in preferential thinking, since Catholics are affected by culture just as everybody else is. Changes in thinking according to preference are not reliable. We know firsthand that the development of the character of the Church isn’t a steady upward incline. Church historians widely agree, for example, that in the period after the Crusades & the spread of universities, and prior to the Protestors, the Church was at a low point in her history. During this time, around the 1400s, there are many disappointing views that you could have found across Catholic Europe.

Ahh okay, so a non-Catholic who is truly sorry for sins can be saved then?

Heaven via Purgatory. With God’s grace, His endless mercy, and if that is His will.

Whenever you hear the word “mortal sin”, a lot of times, what the poster really means is “grave sin”.

A grave sin is something serious that, when done with full consent and knowledge, will separate a person from God. This would make it a mortal sin.

Not even murder is necessarily going to be a mortal sin, even though it is always a grave sin. Fact is, the vast majority of people posting on CAF got the spiritually long end of the sick in life. It doesn’t necessarily mean the rest of the world is going to Hell.

If the circumstances of life make a person strong, it is in order for them to help those that are weaker. A person is not strong for their own sake.

If the circumstances of life make a person weak, it is in order for them to glorify God in their dependance on Him. In their weakness, God will lift them up, and he will do this through the virtuous strong that act as his instruments.

Yes

In other words, they are one and the same thing.

Not even murder is necessarily going to be a mortal sin, even though it is always a grave sin.

No. Grave sin is synonymous with mortal sin. Murder is always grave or mortal sin.

Fact is, the vast majority of people posting on CAF got the spiritually long end of the sick in life. It doesn’t necessarily mean the rest of the world is going to Hell.

I have no idea what that means.

f the circumstances of life make a person strong, it is in order for them to help those that are weaker. A person is not strong for their own sake.

If the circumstances of life make a person weak, it is in order for them to glorify God in their dependance on Him. In their weakness, God will lift them up, and he will do this through the virtuous strong that act as his instruments.

Where are you getting this from? This is possible but not necessary for all circumstances.

Well said.

Well said.

I do not presume about God’s good judgment of my soul.
It is my deepest desire to grow closer in love with Him each day.
Do I hope to gain Heaven? Of course.
But I cannot understand or discern what heaven is like. I do not discern or understand what purgatory is like. Although in both cases, I believe that a tiny bit has been revealed to me at specific times in my life.

It’s the present that I am focused on. My relationship with Him, praying for those who have left this mortal coil already, and praying as much as I can for the people I love who do not have a relationship with Him. If they only knew the peace, love, and joy that God gives us now. One can only imagine the incredible joy that heaven holds.

A wise person told me a long time ago never to aim for purgatory, but to live life striving for a stainless soul, so that heaven is the choice. Aiming for purgatory just might get you to hell.

I don’t like the poll.

It misrepresents what Purgatory is.

Purgatory is not some middle place where the sort of bad or not quite good enough people go.

I would say 100% of people that die in Gods grace go through some purification as they enter heaven.

The great saints maybe are handed a baby wipe to clean some dust from their hands and most others get a full delousing, but all are purified in some way.

So the answer is heaven or hell for destination. If you get heaven be prepared for some cleaning on the way.

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