Catholics reverts. . .


#1

How did you come to realize that the Catholic Church was right all along?

Was it a defining moment or a series smaller steps?


#2

For me, it was a flash/bang. I was reading the bible for comfort after my parents died, and I came across the story of the last supper. When I read the words of Jesus “do this in memory of me”, I realised in an instant that the mass came straight from the bible, and that cemented it for me.
Lukelion


#3

Series of small steps that happened over ten! years. Did not realise what was happening, became so greedy for books on Christ and His Church, untill recently sank right in, hopefully never to come out again :slight_smile:


#4

I married a Southern Baptist. You wanna’ learn your faith? Learn to answer the questions of a Southern Baptist!


#5

Thanks folks.

I was drawn back to the Church mostly by realizing that I had made some serious mistakes concerning moral issues.

One unrelated incident really made me think. I saw a man in my part of the neighborhood one day. There were no other houses within a quarter mile. I introduced myself and we had a brief, friendly conversation. (I’m a white southerner and this gentleman is Black.)

After a few minutes of conversation, he asked me out of the blue “Are you a Catholic?” I told him I was (even though I wasn’t practicing), and asked why he thought so. He said it was because of my approach to him, that I wasn’t stand off-ish. He is a Catholic too.

For some reason, this simple little interaction had a major impact on me.


#6

:getholy: “history” and applogetics.you want the “original” it is the Catholic Church,Jesus does’nt make mistakes


#7

I hadn’t been to church since I was a teenager, and nearly 25 years later, after having passed the same small parish almost daily for 15 years, I was prompted by my five-year-old to go to Mass (she asked me on her way to school if I was ever going to take her to church).

That very Sunday, I took her to Mass. During the consecration, it hit me like a brick, or maybe like a lead weight, that this was what love was all about–this love between God and his people–right there as the priest held the host above his head for what seemed like an eternity. And then he slowly brought the Eucharist down to the altar and I knew this was a life-changing moment for me.

Went to confession, had our marriage blessed, and began attending daily Mass. I will never forget that moment during the consecration when God, literally I think, entered my heart.

Penitent


#8

My wife, who wasn’t Catholic when we met, became interested in the faith through a friend, and decided explore the faith via RCIA. I (an arrogant fallen away Catholic) went with her to make sure she got the straight scoop. I was blown away when I realized how much I thought I knew that I really didn’t know.

I regret the 15 years I wasted being away from the faith. And I am saddened by the terrible catechesis that was offered to me as I grew up in the years post Vatican II. Parents…learn this beautiful faith and teach it to your kids. Kids…learn this beautiful faith and teach it to your parents.


#9

I feel that the early Church Fathers and the grace of God did it for me. I had never heard of the Early Church Fathers, until I had the thought to look into the history of the Church, I thought that I would find a church free from any “Religious Spirit” and anything Catholic. The religious spirit is that so called spirit calling people to put on the unnecessary chains of ritual and thing of that nature.
What I found when I started to read the Early Church Fathers was liturgical worship, the Holy Eucharist, Communion of the Saints, and the fathers distinguishing themselves from heretical groups by stating that they were Catholic and in Communion with Rome. What a Shock!!! :thumbsup: But I got to say I still struggled for a while but with Gods grace I was able to come back “Home to Rome” after a few years away. All Glory and Power to God in the Highest!!!


#10

[quote=StCsDavid]Parents…learn this beautiful faith and teach it to your kids. Kids…learn this beautiful faith and teach it to your parents.
[/quote]

Great line! I’m going to tell this to my kids today.


#11

It started for me when I realized how much the Mass still felt like home, even after having been away. It continued from there.


#12

[quote=StCsDavid]… I was blown away when I realized how much I thought I knew that I really didn’t know.

I regret the 15 years I wasted being away from the faith. And I am saddened by the terrible catechesis that was offered to me as I grew up in the years post Vatican II. Parents…learn this beautiful faith and teach it to your kids. Kids…learn this beautiful faith and teach it to your parents.
[/quote]

Excellent post.:thumbsup: Great advice.

I didn’t drift too far in my early years, at least not away from the Catholic Church. But I was just crusing, missing mass about once a month and not knowing much about my faith (poor catechesis again…). My “revertion” took years. My confirmation at age 24, my family life becoming more important in my life, beginning to realize through the witness of others that Sunday mass was important and not waived just because we were “on vacation” or traveling, etc.

The critical moment for me was attending a Cursillo weekend a couple of years ago. I got a crash course in my faith that weekend, and I have never been the same since. My Lord had been molding me for years, and then He pitched me a fastball of grace right over the plate…and together we hit it out of the park. We’re still rounding the bases (making sure to step on every one!) on our way to home (plate).


#13

I’m a retread. (Prodigal son).

Let me put it like this: When I attended Protestant sects it was like being in a wonderfull dream state. Everybody was carefree and happy in my dreamstate of milk and honey! When I began to awake Sunday afternoon I woke up with a headache and realized I passed out after a severe Saturday night drinking binge. As I began to regain my senses I realized I was not happy at all. It was all just make believe and invented in my mind. I threw away the booze called “RE”-form and returned to the Word Jesus gave us in His Catholic Church.

My reconcilliation to Christ from a Baptist was slow at first. It gained momentum though as time passed. After 27 adult years of being saved and believeing whatever I wanted, I started to see the errors and flaws in the Baptist opinions. They were small flaws at first but the more I studied Baptist/Protestant propaganda and brianwashing the more I realized they did not form a unity that could be from God. I searched back in history to see where their (my) belief’s came from and how they developed. I studied Protestant sources only and found how they had no sources of proof for thier opinions and were often contridicting of each other. Searching in Protestant sources I discovered the truth in the Catholic Church and history proved it. I crossed the Tiber crying as the Holy Spirit pulled me home kicking and screaming to let me stay Protestant, care free, with my head in the hole of my own liking. Praise God, He loved me too much to let me rot as a Protestant!

When the scales come off your eyes there is only one Faith like it or not. That Faith is from God and preserved intact for us today by the Catholic Church.


#14

I was baptized Catholic as an infant. I spent my early years with my High Protestant grandparents who never mentioned my baptism to me. My later years with my parents were so consumed with work and leisure that church was a non-issue. In 7th grade, the notes going home from school about drugs and weapons made my parents uneasy. The next year they enrolled me in the Catholic school across the street. Part of school was going to Mass. I immediately fell in love. The true presence in the Eucharist was apparent to me and spoke directly to my soul. I had absolutely zero Catholic catechesis (good, bad, or indifferent) at this point. I knew I was where I belonged. Only then did I learn that I already was a Catholic! I recieved my first communion/ reconcilliation and in the following years my sister joined me, followed by our mom’s reversion, and then my dad’s conversion.


#15

I lapsed (pride is a terrible thing) during the college years and thought spiritual matters unimportant. Then, life happened and as crisis intruded into my heretofore carefully integrated, intellectual life, I was driven to my knees quite literally. The Rosary became my mantra. Then (don’t laugh!) I heard my named called. I knew it was time to go home - my Mother had called me to her Son. I was never so grateful.

“What drives you to your knees you should thank God for.” Amen!


#16

My reversion to the Catholic Church was both a flash/boom and a series of small steps.

My parents are devout Catholics. In fact my mom had been in a convent and my father had been in the seminary. They both felt called to the married life and soon after leaving their respective orders(before taking their vows), they met fell in love and married. My father was quite strict and I rebelled against that as a teenager. The fact that I was also reading magazines like Cosmo and Glamour and hanging out with friends who had no faith whatsoever completed my transformation to the ways of the world. So often during this time I felt lost and aimless not knowing where I should direct my path.

To make a long story short, at the age of 24, I became a single parent to a wonderful little boy. I had to move back to my parents’ house. My parents would take my little boy to church with them on Sunday mornings and I took that opportunity to get a little rest. My Dad would always invite me to go with them. I begged off. As my little boy got older, he would cry when he was separated from me so it became impossible to let him go off to Mass with my parents without also going along with them. The first time I went back, I was nearly overcome with tears of gratitude and joy and remorse that God would still love me despite my deliberate separation from Him.

Two things going on at the same time. I began to date the man who was to become my husband. When one of my friends began to disparage the Church, he simply said “I’m Catholic” and my friend shut up pretty quickly. This was amazing for me as my friends for years had teased me as “a good Catholic schoolgirl” and I had never put up any defense. Secondly, my parents were encouraging me to pray for my son’s father because he also was a child of God. Though they also were angry with him. this helped me to choose joy over bitterness. I can never thank them enough for this! They truly showed me how to pray for my enemies and be good to those who persecuted me and helped me to understand my own sinfulness and my own deep need for the love of Christ.

Those were the big things. To describe all the small steps that came thereafter would take a whole 'nother reply.

God Bless!

Ann Elise

“Love is the fulfillment of the law” Rom 13:10


#17

In my case, it was a series of small steps, some forward, some backwards.

I’m a cradle Catholic, though only nominally. I was never taught the faith while my parents went from seances to African cults. My preparation for 1st communion happened only when I was 14, but I didn’t follow along.

After exploring new age stuff, I finally came across Rene Guenon, who steered me back to my tradition. That’s when, at college, I reverted to the Church for the 1st time. St. Augustine through his Confessions was pivotal in this period, leading me to seek being confirmed.

However, at the 1st opportunity to fall into sin, I did. Then, I rejected everything I believed in, not because I concluded them to be untrue, but because they didn’t fit my “new life”.

God being merciful and patient as He is, after 10 years He called me back to Him at His Church. Now, with 2 teenage children, my cross became making up for the time I raised them without any religious instruction.

I started noticing that if I don’t teach them any religion, there are a bunch of “gurus” who will, from liberals to socialists and from Pentecostals to witches.

May God have mercy on my soul, lead me not into temptation and deliver me from the evil one.

:blessyou:


#18

My wife and I, both cradle Catholics, made sure our kide received Frist Communion and then left.
We found that we were angrier when we left Mass than when we arrived. We pulled the kids out of CCD shortly thereafter. It wasn’t even close to being Catholic.
We were blindsided by abuses of Vtican II and didn’t even know it.
We never joined any other denomination and always considered ourselves Catholic. We just weren’t practising.
Twenty-five years later, my wife was channel surfing and came upon Mother Angelica. She was dressed jusl like the sisters who taught us in grade school. We discovered there still were Catholics out there.
Twenty minutes later, we both decided to go to Confession and get back to Mass.
BOY, ARE WE BACK! Involved and loving it.
They’ll never chase me out again. I’ll fight abuse to my dying breath.


#19

[quote=Augustine]I started noticing that if I don’t teach them any religion, there are a bunch of “gurus” who will, from liberals to socialists and from Pentecostals to witches.

[/quote]

Sounds familiar.

Although I was a non-practicing and pretty much agnostic faith-wise, I considered myself Catholic because, due to my own moral mistakes, I knew Catholics had the morals part of the equation right. I knew I wanted my kids religious education handled by the Church.


#20

I used to laugh these things off as coincidental, now I find myself in admiration of the spirituality people are able to find in their lives.

Those were the big things. To describe all the small steps that came thereafter would take a whole 'nother reply.

Let 'er rip!


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