Catholics Slaughtered Protestants?

On Wednesday I opened my newspaper to find this statement in the Today in History section:

"In 1572, the slaughter of French Protestants at the hands of Catholics began in Paris."

Can anyone give me some “concise” historical facts/refutations regarding this statement? Or direct me to some resources that will help me know the facts? I am assuming it is in referernce to the French Revolution(?) Or Inqusitions?

Thanks!!

St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre.

The French King saw the leading Protestant as a threat. Anyway, some person tried to assasinate the leading Protestant. The leading Protestant thought it was the French King and began planning a coup. The French King learned of it and ordered him killed. When the population of Paris saw that the leading Protestant had been killed by the King’s soldiers, they attacked the Protestant population. They thought that it was official policy. They decided to take out 20 years of aggression by killing every Protestant in Paris. During the French Wars of Religion, Protestants had stormed Catholic Churches, etc, and Catholics retaliated. It was years of bad blood that boiled over during a royal squabble.

[quote=CinciCatholic]On Wednesday I opened my newspaper to find this statement in the Today in History section:

"In 1572, the slaughter of French Protestants at the hands of Catholics began in Paris."

Can anyone give me some “concise” historical facts/refutations regarding this statement? Or direct me to some resources that will help me know the facts? I am assuming it is in referernce to the French Revolution(?) Or Inqusitions?

Thanks!!

[/quote]

it is a reference to the St Bartholomews Day “massacre” when a few Hugenots (French Protestants) who had been agitating against the government where arrested by the order of the queen, Catherine de Medici, a Catholic, and some were later executed after trials for heresy, treason and other offenses. There was not wholesale bloodshed and riot in the streets no matter what spin history books put on the incident.

[quote=puzzleannie]it is a reference to the St Bartholomews Day “massacre” when a few Hugenots (French Protestants) who had been agitating against the government where arrested by the order of the queen, Catherine de Medici, a Catholic, and some were later executed after trials for heresy, treason and other offenses. There was not wholesale bloodshed and riot in the streets no matter what spin history books put on the incident.
[/quote]

There was a wholesale massacre. However, it was not the official policy of the government. It was an accident. The French population saw that the Royal Soldiers had killed the leading Protestant and some of his retainers. They interpreted as a declaration of war on the Huguenots. The result was a massacre, that had to do with the decades of animosity that had been created during the on again off again Wars of Religion.

When our Protestant brothers bring up Catholic crimes, they always forget the Protestant crimes against their Catholic brothers.

To this day, many Irish refuse to call the great tragedy of their island the Irish Potato “Famine.” Instead they call it “the Great Hunger.” Why?

Because the Irish Potato Famine really was engineered by the Protestant majority in Parliament in London.

The Catholics of Ireland, driven off their ancestral lands at gunpoint, were regard as useless farm animals by their Protestant English overlords. The Protestant overlords realized that they could maximize profits by forcing the Irish to engage in mass cultivation of a non-native plant, the potato.

The Irish complied, rather than revolt.

So, about two-thirds of the Irish Catholics lived in dirty little mud huts next to their dirty little potato “lazy beds,” while they lived lives of extraordinary Catholic virtue. Several European writers at the time remarked on the almost shocking virtue of the Irish Catholics in this period.

Then, in 1845, a sailor from a boat from America, biting into a potato from America, tasted it, realized it was rotten, and threw it in disgust onto the Isle of Wight. The potato was infested with potato blight spores. The spores infested and quickly wiped out the crop on the Isle of Wight. Either the wind, or exported potatoes, carried the disease to England, where either the wind, or exports, carried the disease to Ireland.

In 1845, only a substantial percentage of the potato crop failed in Ireland.

In 1846, 1847 and 1848, the Irish potato crop failed totally.

In 1846, when the potato blight had caused only about one-third of Ireland’s “lazy bed” farmers to behind in the rents they paid to the English Preotestants to use the lands stolen from them at gunpoint, Parliament in London passed the Four Pound Clause. The * ostensible* concept was to impose an annual tax of what would be about $2,500 today on every single potato “lazy bed,” to force Protestant landlords to stop cultivation of potatoes, and at the same to to raise money for famine relief.

The records of Parliament, still in existence today, record the pleas of Irish Catholic representatives in Parliament to refrain from imposing the tax, because the law at the time permitted landlords to evict for no reaqson at all, if they wanted to. “The Catholics will all be evicted!” they screamed. “They’ll be homeless! They’ll starve! They’ll die! PLEASE don’t do this!”

Parliament ignored the pleas. The law passed. Within 6 months, 4 million Irish Catholics had been evicted from their little mud huts.

1.5 million died of starvation, walking the roads of Ireland.

500,000 more died from sickness on boats bound for America.

As Irish Catholic families walked the roads to their death, *Protestant-ruled Ireland remained a net exporter of food during the Potato Famine. *When starving Catholic fathers watched their wives and children collapse into the gutters and die, and then looked at the wharves packed with non-potato foods for export *from * Ireland by the Protestant overlords, they began to charge the docks with sticks and rocks and rakes, to seize the food and feed it to their families.

Protestant soldiers were rushed to Ireland from England. They would lie in wait behind the crates of food, and when mobs of starving Catholic fathers would storm the docks with sticks to grab food for their starving children, the soldiers would stand up and mow down the charging Catholic fathers with volley after volley of gunfire, covering the wharves with great piles of starved Catholic cadavers.

Notice that in scale the Irish Potato Famine was in the same category as the Holocaust. We’re all disgusting, Catholics AND Protestants, aren’t we?

got links?

[quote=Atreyu]got links?
[/quote]

Well, much of the information is from books. Those cites I can give later when I consult my little library. I researched the subject when I discovered that my great grandmother and her first husband lived in one of those little mud huts in Londonderry County with her first husband, who after their eviction starved himself to death by giving my great grandmother the few scraps of food they were able to scrape together. Even that was not enough to keep the child in my great grandmother’s womb – my Great Aunt Barbara – from being born blind.

Historical things, and the massacre of catholic farmers in Germany in Luther´s times. This is history.

There’s a long article all about it at New Advent. I actually read the whole thing, and it was very interesting. It sounded like it was more political than religious, but I encourage you to read the article for yourself, if you really want to know about what happened.

God Bless!

Thank you everyone for weighing in on this. The information you’ve provided has been a great help! Very interesting!

God bless you,
CC

[quote=Franze]Historical things, and the massacre of catholic farmers in Germany in Luther´s times. This is history.
[/quote]

Not only is this history, it is largely political history.

“A lot of people are under the impression that the Reformation had something to do with religion.”

  • Liberian

Most anti-Catholic historians fail to mention the fact that the Protestant mob killed, raped, burned, and desecrated more Catholic men, women, children, and churches than Catholics. Catholics suffered greatly during the Protestant Revolution around Europe. That is a historical fact!

I remember reading some Catholic history book about communists and atheists who chopped off and desecrated statues of Christ during the Spanish revolution produced offsprings with missing arms and limbs. Most people fail to believe that those mutations are the work of God. They argue those mutations were coincidence and were caused by environmental factors.

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