CBC Windsor: 'The Downside of High'--Nature of Things Science Program 9/22 1PM

**The Downside of High

Saturday September 22 at 1 pm on CBC-TV**

Teenagers who start smoking marijuana before the age of sixteen are four times more likely to become schizophrenic. That’s the startling conclusion of some of the world’s top schizophrenia experts, whose research is featured in the new documentary The Downside of High.

The scientists’ groundbreaking work on the connection between marijuana and mental illness also reveals that, for all young adults, smoking marijuana nearly doubles the risk of developing recurring psychosis, paranoia and hallucinations - the hallmarks of schizophrenia.

The Downside of High, directed and written by Bruce Mohun, tells the stories of three young people from British Columbia who believe - along with their doctors - that their mental illness was triggered by marijuana use. All three spent months in hospital psychiatric wards, and still wage a battle with their illness. Today’s super-potent pot may be a big part of the problem. Modern growing techniques have dramatically increased the amount of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana - ramping up the threat to the developing teenage brain.

cbc.ca/documentaries/natureofthings/2010/downsideofhigh/

cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes.html

‘The Nature of Things’ Science Show Host:

David Suzuki:

Suzuki received his BA in Biology from Amherst College of Massachusetts in 1958, and his Ph.D in Zoology from the University of Chicago in 1961 . . .

He was a professor in the genetics department (stated in his book Genethics: The Ethics of Engineering Life, 1988) at the University of British Columbia for almost forty years (from 1963 until his retirement in 2001), and has since been professor emeritus at a university research istitute.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Suzuki

David Suzuki is sort of like the Canadian Carl Sagan.

The Downside of High

Thursday May 30 at 8:00 pm on CBC-Windsor

And

Saturday June 8 at 1 pm on CBC-TV

Teenagers who start smoking marijuana before the age of sixteen are four times more likely to become schizophrenic. That’s the startling conclusion of some of the world’s top schizophrenia experts, whose research is featured in the new documentary The Downside of High.

The scientists’ groundbreaking work on the connection between marijuana and mental illness also reveals that, for all young adults, smoking marijuana nearly doubles the risk of developing recurring psychosis, paranoia and hallucinations - the hallmarks of schizophrenia.

‘The Downside of High’, directed and written by Bruce Mohun, tells the stories of three young people from British Columbia who believe - along with their doctors - that their mental illness was triggered by marijuana use. All three spent months in hospital psychiatric wards, and still wage a battle with their illness. Today’s super-potent pot may be a big part of the problem. Modern growing techniques have dramatically increased the amount of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana - ramping up the threat to the developing teenage brain.

cbc.ca/documentaries/natureofthings/2010/downsideofhigh/

Excellent Nature of Things documentary about the harmful effects of smoking marijuana on teens and a young female adult (who started smoking age marijuana at age 19 and became hooked on it) backed by scientific research repeats locally tonight (5/30) on CBC-Windsor.

If you live in the Detroit area, find out what the American Media isn’t telling you about marijuana and its harmful effects on teens who smoke it.

CBC-TV will also be broadcast ‘The Downside of High’ nationally on Saturday June 8 at 1 pm on all CBC-TV stations in Canada.

This comes across as a little heavy handed where alcohol is much more damaging to the same ages.

The harmful effects of tangible drugs on teens, especially marijuana, is ignored and is not addressed by the American Media.

Too many teens, I think, in the U.S. regard marijuana as “wacky tobacky” and don’t know of the health risks.

As citizens, we have a right to be informed.

I agree all alcohol is bad for your health too, teenager or adult.

Marijuana is bad for the developing teenage mind as well.

To your health.

People who started smoking marijuana as teenagers and continued into adulthood showed an average IQ drop of 6 points between age 13 and age 38, according to the study, which followed more than 1,000 New Zealanders from their birth to age 38. People who said they were “dependent” on the drug—meaning it affected their personal or professional life-- showed the greatest decrease.

usnews.com/news/articles/2012/08/27/teen-marijuana-use-associated-with-drop-in-intelligence

BTW, my impression of CBC Host of ‘The Nature of Things’, Canadian Scientist David Suzuki, is one of an active Environmentalist, Conservationist, and a person who politically leans Left, so it isn’t the case that this documentary was produced by Conservatives or a Conservative Group or organization at all.

Marijuana strips out exotic fat fractions, Essential Fatty Acids/EFA’s, that are hard to replace in the modern factory food diet. These fat fractions are contained in hemp seed oil, a better use of the cannabis plant, i.e., as a nutritional oil sans THC. The brain is composed of lipo-proteins, fat-based proteins, so this loss of building blocks in the developing brain is particularly grave. Sugar issues are rampant in schizophrenia/bipolar disorder; and the derangement of sugar cravings with marijuana use–the munchies–along with loss of buffering and building block fats, endangers the youthful brain that is not fully developed until post-teen years. Alcohol will cause outright brain cell death but in the plastic brain, these can be replaced with no long-term damage if behavior doesn’t induce death as in fatal car crashes. But marijuana robbing the neurons of their fatty insulation, robbing cell walls of their lovely double dumbbell EFA gates that let nutrients in and waste out, leaves the developing brain at risk especially when compounded with petro-chemicals that uptake as what the body falsely recognizes as a nutrient hydrocarbon but that is like feeding a starving dog a rubber bone. These effects are apart from doses of plant estrogens, phyto-estrogens, contained in marijuana that can induce breast development in males. Oy! God help us.

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