Celebrating halloween?

#21

It’s funny to read how people celebrate holidays. Any more stories? :slight_smile:
I remember in Catholic Grade School how we all dressed up as a favorite saint in class and shared treats and short speeches or essays about the saint we chose. It was all in fun like your celebration. There were a lot of halos (haha) :angel1::getholy:. at their desks.
Then on the following day, All Saints Day, we would attend Mass as a class. Do schoolchildren still sing, “When the Saints Go Marching In…” just wondering? as anyone my age or older probably can recall.

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#22

It seems a pretty straightforward issue. If you’re a Catholic and you’re not celebrating Halloween for it’s occult meaning, and are not tempted to, you have nothing at all to worry about in celebrating, unless you’re a diabetic or have a junk food addiction. There seems to be suggestions that holiday’s status as as silly secular retail bonanza somehow makes it inherently sinful and off limits for Catholics. I still remember enough of the theology to know that’s not so. If it were, Catholics would be barred from celebrating Christmas in our society anytime from the day after Halloween to New Years. If the mere fact of a pagan association puts you off of Halloween, you ought not to be celebrating Christmas at all on Dec. 25 as it has everything to do with the pagan celebration of winter soltice and the birth of the sun god, and no connection whatsoever to the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

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#23

[quote="kenofken, post:22, topic:211827"]
It seems a pretty straightforward issue. If you're a Catholic and you're not celebrating Halloween for it's occult meaning, and are not tempted to, you have nothing at all to worry about in celebrating, unless you're a diabetic or have a junk food addiction. There seems to be suggestions that holiday's status as as silly secular retail bonanza somehow makes it inherently sinful and off limits for Catholics. I still remember enough of the theology to know that's not so. If it were, Catholics would be barred from celebrating Christmas in our society anytime from the day after Halloween to New Years. If the mere fact of a pagan association puts you off of Halloween, you ought not to be celebrating Christmas at all on Dec. 25 as it has everything to do with the pagan celebration of winter soltice and the birth of the sun god, and no connection whatsoever to the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

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It's not just junk food that can be a problem, but junk in general. There are many people of good will, Christian and not, who question the increasing materialism that surrounds modern American holiday celebrations, too.

If a person were to avoid kitschy celebrations of Halloween on the grounds that they think it poses a near occasion of sin for themselves and others, I can't find a quarrel with that.

There are a great many things that are allowed to some that we might discern that we ourselves do better to do without. Just as St. Paul said on one hand that meat offered to idols was not off-limits, per se, so also he said he'd do without meat altogether, if it posed a stumbling block to his brother.

So take this passage, and substitute halloween kitsch for meat sacrificed to idols (underline mine, obviously), and I think that covers the topic:

"*Now in regard to meat sacrificed to idols: we realize that "all of us have knowledge"; knowledge inflates with pride, but love builds up. If anyone supposes he knows something, he does not yet know as he ought to know. But if one loves God, one is known by him.

So about the eating of meat sacrificed to idols: we know that "there is no idol in the world," and that "there is no God but one." Indeed, even though there are so-called gods in heaven and on earth (there are, to be sure, many "gods" and many "lords"), yet for us there is one God, the Father, from whom all things are and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom all things are and through whom we exist. But not all have this knowledge. There are some who have been so used to idolatry up until now that, when they eat meat sacrificed to idols, their conscience, which is weak, is defiled.

Now food will not bring us closer to God. We are no worse off if we do not eat, nor are we better off if we do. But make sure that this liberty of yours in no way becomes a stumbling block to the weak. If someone sees you, with your knowledge, reclining at table in the temple of an idol, may not his conscience too, weak as it is, be "built up" to eat the meat sacrificed to idols? Thus through your knowledge, the weak person is brought to destruction, the brother for whom Christ died. When you sin in this way against your brothers and wound their consciences, weak as they are, you are sinning against Christ. Therefore, if food causes my brother to sin, I will never eat meat again, so that I may not cause my brother to sin." **1 Cor. 8:1-13*

The question is, then, will your action pose a temptation to someone with a weak conscience? It is not enough that it is not sinful for you, nor sinful per se. You have to take some care to guard the virtue of others, as well, if that might be a problem.

In the OP's case, it is *extremely unlikely *that someone will see her party and be tempted to abandon Christianity to practice witchcraft, or to think that witchcraft and Christianity can be reconciled in a single spiritual practice. Even someone who actually does practice witchcraft would think no such thing.

Assuming the family doesn't spend beyond their means, I don't think that there is any danger, assuming they are doing nothing that would make someone already in a nature religion feel they are being made sport of. Her relatives may fear she's being too cavilier with what they deem dangerous, but nobody is really going to think this family is making a case for Wicca.

Or, as a Wiccan might put it: "And you harm none, do what you will."

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#24

[quote="Luigi_Daniele, post:9, topic:211827"]
Unholiest, I think you meant.;)

Despise Halloween. :)

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What's the matter? Didn't get as much candy? :rolleyes::p;)

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#25

I love Halloween. In high school I won "Best Costume" every year :D

I miss trick-or-treating :(

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#26

Hi EasterJoy,
You make a very valid point. I will indeed take a closer look.
God Bless,
Colmcille.:slight_smile:

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#27

[quote="colmcille1, post:26, topic:211827"]
Hi EasterJoy,
You make a very valid point. I will indeed take a closer look.
God Bless,
Colmcille.:)

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And I promise that if you decide the price isn't worth the payoff, I will defend you, and not let anyone call you a spoil-sport! :thumbsup:

If a holiday isn't a Holy Day, live and let those who want to, leave it alone. Nothing wrong with that! If you think it a danger, pointing out the danger you find, done in all charity, is a good deed.

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closed #28
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