Celebrating Mass in Outer Space

How does one celebrate Mass in a 0-gravity environment? Does facing East no longer matter? :slight_smile:

Most likely Mass would simply not be allowed in 0-G. In past centuries, for instance, Mass could not be celebrated on board a ship because of the danger of spillage. One might argue that precautions and special gear could be taken to avoid the risk, but these could have been taken on ships, too; instead they were simply forbidden.

How does one keep the wine in the cup?

rwoehmke

Originally Posted by How does one keep the wine in the cup?

Space Wine. (it’s like Space Ice Cream) :slight_smile:

What if gravity could be simulated?

Like, isn’t the turning of the International Space Station kind of simulating gravity for them? I feel ashamed because I don’t really follow all that anymore, I used to be so up on all that stuff.

But, if you have gravity, and air, and water, (and all the other vessels, furnishings, wine, bread, whatever) couldn’t it be allowable to celebrate Mass?

The ISS does not turn or rotate in space. There is zero gravity and this has always been a problem on long space flights. Some have returned from space and have passed out because the muscles can no longer support them in 1g. A good example of “If you don’t use it you’ll loose it”.

I think a good question is what Diocese would have jurisdiction. The ISS moves pretty fast. Would it be like Antarctica which is administered by a group of congregations.

How about pre-intincting hosts?
They would no doubt have to be individually wrapped, maybe in reusable gold foil to qualify as “sacred vessels”.

I suppose you could celebrate a communion service if you brought up pre-consecrated hosts in a pyx. It wouldn’t require any wine.

I’m sure some kind of container could be designed for wine in a space Mass. You could make a sort of flask from gold that’s two chambered. One chamber would have the wine, and a smaller chamber would contain water that you could press a button to release and mix with the wine (so it would all be self-contained). Then, you could have a straw or spout (permanently connected) that you could drink out of, with a valve to turn on and shut off the flow of wine. You would have to insert the straw into your mouth, THEN turn the valve, ingest the Blood of Christ, close the valve, and suck out anything remaining. It’s doubtful anything would be left in the straw, and if it was, surface tension would keep it fastened to the inside of the straw. When done, the whole thing could be placed into a sterile bag (in case of breakage or any remaining wine stuck in the straw), and properly disposed of on Earth.

Who cares? I just wanna see zero-gravity liturgical dance! :smiley:

Hey, I want to see who takes up the collection?:wink:

However, this is amazing and worth checking out.
apostles.com/hubble.html

And the Eucharist was already celebrated on the moon.
clawoftheconciliator.blogspot.com/2006/07/eucharist-on-moon.html

What about candles? All electronic bulbs?

Does Episcopal Communion count as Eucharist?

It looks like Nasa takes all faiths into consideration.
Nice thought, actually.

space.newscientist.com/article/dn9031-when-youre-in-orbit-which-way-is-mecca.html

Awesome! I had thought about making a thread about “space-Muslims” a while back, but didn’t. Well, here’s my answer!

Still, does anyone else wonder if, when the Moon or other planets are finally colonized, the Scriptures will seem somehow more distant (if not irrelevent, in some’s view) when detailing geography and other earthly conquests and events? Granted, all will be somewhat aware of their earthly origins–but at least here we can look at a map of the East and get some kind of sense of where the events chronicled are taking place. On another planet, it will all seem so very distant… Not only would the readers have to overcome cultural barriers to better understand God’s Written Word, but now planetary ones, as well.

Thoughts?

NASA might reasonably be presumed to be under the jurisdiction of the Archdiocese for the U.S. Military, but I don’t know if that would apply to astronauts from other countries, even on the same space station.

How would it be any different for foreign astronauts than me going to another parish in another diocese to visit? They don’t have to register in a military parish, just partake in the Mass.

If you know North, you know East:

The Galactic North Pole is at
Right ascension 12 : 51.4 (h : m)
Declination +27 : 07 (deg : m)

seds.lpl.arizona.edu/Messier/more/mw.html

Next question? :smiley:

OK. I thought maybe they had a part of it that did. Thanks for the info.

Ya gotta understand, sometimes I’m on quite late and I don’t think the ol’ brain box is workin’ at full capacity! I’m probably remembering 2001…

You would also have the problem of purifying (and later cleaning) the sacred vessels.

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