Chalice, paten, etc stacked

In my religious ed class today we were talking about all the “stuff” in the church. One of my kids asked if there was a reason that the chalice and paten and everything are all stacked up together. I know what all the stuff is, but is there a reason, other than convenience, that it is all stacked together? Thanks!

I can’t imagine any significance other than convenience of carrying. It doesn’t stay that way long during Mass, and it doesn’t stay that way in storage.

The veil, burse and chalice veil may not be kept that way, but in nearly every sacristy in which I have been (a lot), the paten, purificator and pall are stacked together. Since a paten and chalice are generally a set, that is the norm for storing them, as it keeps them together and takes up less space.

Usually in the tabernacle, if there are more than one ciboria, they are stacked since they would not fit any other way. They are made to fit stacked one on the other.

This may not be the exact situation you’re referring to, but I have noticed this at times (usually with an uninformed EMHC) and it really makes me cringe…

When the sacred vessels have been used to distribute Eucharist, they should never be stacked until after they have been properly purified and all particles of the sacred species removed. Unfortunately, I have seen things stacked in such a way that it would be difficult at best to properly remove all remaining particles.

I remember the use of the veil from my childhood. The priest would get it all lined up with tight lines and crisp edges. Now I usually just see a purificator placed between the chalice and the patten.

Thanks all! That is pretty much what I figured, but I had never really thought about it until I was asked, so I figured I would check. :smiley:

yes, the veil is not used anymore in the modern roman rite.

Isn’t the veil the colored piece of cloth that covers the stack of chalice, paten, etc? If so, my parish always uses it.

From the 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) approved for the USA, which can be accessed from romanrite.com/girm.html :

“118. … It is a praiseworthy practice to cover the chalice with a veil, which may be either the color of the day or white.”

“163. … If the vessels are purified at the altar, they are carried to the credence table by a minister. Nevertheless, it is also permitted, especially if there are several vessels to be purified, to leave them suitably covered on a corporal, either at the altar or at the credence table, and to
purify them immediately after Mass following the dismissal of the people.”

And: …
“183. When the distribution of Communion is completed, the deacon returns to the altar with the priest and collects the fragments, if any remain, and then carries the chalice and other sacred vessels to the credence table, where he purifies them and arranges them in the usual way while the priest returns to the chair. It is also permissible to leave the vessels that need to be purified, suitably covered, at the credence table on a corporal and to purify them immediately after Mass following the dismissal of the people.”

It is not clear to me why it is a “praiseworthy practice to cover the chalice with a veil”. In n. 163 and n. 183 the covering seems to be a way to indicate that the vessels are not purified. But this indication would not work if they are always covered.

Generally the use of a veil is to show special reverence for something. For example, the humeral veil.

In our NO parish the veil follows the liturgical color and it is used at every Mass.

Mine too.

Isn’t the veil the colored piece of cloth that covers the stack of chalice, paten, etc? If so, my parish always uses it.
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Yes, that’s the chalice veil. :slight_smile: It’s not required in the Novus Ordo but, just as the maniple, it’s use is optional. While some do use it, most, apparently, do not.

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