chalice


#1

I know that new guidelines specify that the blood of Christ must be given, during communion, in gold-plated chalices. Does this apply to the chalice used during consecration? I would assume so. I looked up during the presentation of the blood of Christ, as the priest was holding it for the congregation to see, and it was contained in a clear glass chalice. He later poured into the gold chalices for distribution. I understand he was probably using the clear glass so that all could see the blood, but is this a violation of new guidelines? If so, could someone reference me to a document to verify. This was just a fill-in priest, so I’ll probably pick my battles, but wanted to know for sure. Thanks.


#2

I thought the vessels had to simply be durable, not necessarily gold. Which guidelines are you referring to and how new are they?


#3

The vessels, except in very extraordinary cases of emergency, have always been required to be made of incorruptible metals, not breakable ceramics or glass, and not corruptible metals. In practice that has usually meant gold plating over something else. This applies to all chalices containing the precious blood, and not just the ones used for distribution. A priest who consecrates in a glass “chalice” is arrogantly assuming that he and he alone is incapable of dropping the vessel containing the most precious blood.


#4

[quote=awfulthings9]I know that new guidelines specify that the blood of Christ must be given, during communion, in gold-plated chalices. Does this apply to the chalice used during consecration? I would assume so. I looked up during the presentation of the blood of Christ, as the priest was holding it for the congregation to see, and it was contained in a clear glass chalice. He later poured into the gold chalices for distribution. I understand he was probably using the clear glass so that all could see the blood, but is this a violation of new guidelines? If so, could someone reference me to a document to verify. This was just a fill-in priest, so I’ll probably pick my battles, but wanted to know for sure. Thanks.
[/quote]

IT is not required to be gold but precious metal. The inside I believe may be required to be gold. The Precious Blood is not to be poured from one container to another after the Consecration. No breakable material is to be used for any chalice.


#5

I found that the question is answered in the ask an apologist thread. Search for chalice.

I guess I should have looked before posting. :rolleyes:


#6

There seem to have been two breaches of the 2004 Instruction Redemptionis Sacramentum.

Firstly the wrong material for the chalice: "[117.] Sacred vessels for containing the Body and Blood of the Lord must be made in strict conformity with the norms of tradition and of the liturgical books.[Footnote 205: Cf. Missale Romanum, Institutio Generalis, nn. 327-333.]The Bishops’ Conferences have the faculty to decide whether it is appropriate, once their decisions have been given the recognitio by the Apostolic See, for sacred vessels to be made of other solid materials as well. It is strictly required, however, that such materials be truly noble in the common estimation within a given region,[Footnote 206 Missale Romanum, Institutio Generalis, n. 332.]so that honour will be given to the Lord by their use, and all risk of diminishing the doctrine of the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharistic species in the eyes of the faithful will be avoided. Reprobated, therefore, is any practice of using for the celebration of Mass common vessels, or others lacking in quality, or devoid of all artistic merit or which are mere containers, as also other vessels made from glass, earthenware, clay, or other materials that break easily. This norm is to be applied even as regards metals and other materials that easily rust or deteriorate.[Footnote 207: Cf. Missale Romanum, Institutio Generalis, n. 332; Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Instruction, Inaestimabile donum, n. 16: AAS 72 (1980) p. 338.]

Secondly: “[106.] However, the pouring of the Blood of Christ after the consecration from one vessel to another is completely to be avoided, lest anything should happen that would be to the detriment of so great a mystery.”

The references to “Missale Romanum, Institutio Generalis” or the General Instruction to the Roman Missal (GIRM) can be checked at romanrite.com/girm.html


#7

Great replies. Thanks all.


#8

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.