Challenges to the Eucharist

We’re all probably familiar with a variety of attacks on the Eucharist, even that it is cannibalisitic. However, I recently came across one that threw me for a loop. I never thought about it, perhaps because it is so obvious it never crossed my mind.
Jesus became fully mortal (though fully devise) yes? The very definition of mortal/human is being confined to time and space, yes? So how on earth Jesus be present in millions of masses over the centuries all over the planet? I can see how God can, being outside of time and space, our Creator, insert himself into our world like a storyteller putting himself in a book, but how can His incarnation, Jesus, a finite man, be present everywhere?
How can the* finite* be* infinite*?

God is infinite. He is everywhere, but at the same time, nowhere. The Eucharist is the same. God can be in every Host and Chalice.

Because the bread and wine we receive are his body, blood, soul and divinity, of which the first two parts exist in their glorified form. In fact this form will be our future form, a flesh of a different type. The glorified form is transformed by the Spirit and takes on the supernatural, which allows for let’s say, multidimensional existence.

Ironically, your question is ’ how on earth Jesus be present in millions of masses over the centuries all over the planet?’ It’s precisely because Jesus being fully human and fully God at the same time, is not constrained by time and space.
It’s a Sacred Mystery that our limited human brains can not comprehend. :signofcross: Maybe someday we will ‘get it’…:heaven:
For God nothing is impossible (Lk 1:37)

That is correct, Jesus is fully human.

Because Jesus is fully God as well. As God, the second person of the trinity, He is outside of time and space.

It is a mistake to think of Jesus as only human or only God. He is both, and thus can be present everywhere, anytime.

Our Lord Jesus Christ is present in the Eucharist as Body and Blood, Soul and Devinity via Transubstantiation. Present as the second person of the Trinity who was crucified, suffered, died and was buried; and rose again in fullfillment of the scriptures. This is the sacrifice of the Mass.

How so? Isn’t the definition of human to be finite? Yes, Jesus’ divine nature is infinite. But we receive his physical, mortal, finite body in the Eucharist. Is that not a contradiction? Again, isn’t what makes us mortal humans in the first place being limited to time and space?

e: Challenges to the Eucharist
Because the bread and wine we receive are his body, blood, soul and divinity, of which the first two parts exist in their glorified form. In fact this form will be our future form, a flesh of a different type. The glorified form is transformed by the Spirit and takes on the supernatural, which allows for let’s say, multidimensional existence.

Sheadad
I have to say, your explanation is the most helpful to me so far. Could you please tell just where you read that? Which St. or philosopher/s came up with that?
Also, won’t even our glorified bodies be limited in time and space? They won’t be everywhere, will they? So how does this quality make it transubstantiation possible?

Such persons are only regurgitating the ancient, and condemned Kerinthian, Ebionite, Elchasaite, Mandean and Arian heresies - all of which denied the divine nature of Christ. There were others which denied His humanity.

Ever notice how these folks just know that the Catholic Church is completely wrong, but have nothing at all to say about the sacramentally identical and equally historical Orthodox Churches?

They say Padre Pio could, with the help of God, bilocate. He wasn’t even God!

Yes. And He even died like a mortal.

But then He conquered death and rose again. I don’t think you can call Him mortal after that, do you?

Jesus had a mortal life and He suffered a mortal death. Then He rose again, no longer mortal, but glorified. Hope that helps.

Thanks, Clear Water, I nearly whacked my forehead when I read that. That really cleared it up for me.
Thanks to you as well, Baclk2Church for that excellent point, and to all of you.

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